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  • #1
    Oscar Wilde
    “Actors are so fortunate. They can choose whether they will appear in tragedy or in comedy, whether they will suffer or make merry, laugh or shed tears. But in real life it is different. Most men and women are forced to perform parts for which they have no qualifications. Our Guildensterns play Hamlet for us, and our Hamlets have to jest like Prince Hal. The world is a stage, but the play is badly cast.”
    Oscar Wilde, Lord Arthur Savile's Crime and Other Stories

  • #2
    Oscar Wilde
    “I'm really very sorry, but it is not my fault. People are so annoying. All my pianists look exactly like poets, and all my poets look exactly like pianists”
    Oscar Wilde, Lord Arthur Savile's Crime and Other Stories

  • #3
    Oscar Wilde
    “And yet it was not the mystery, but the comedy of suffering that struck him; its absolute uselessness, its grotesque want of meaning. How incoherent everything seemed! How lacking in all harmony! He was amazed at the discord between the shallow optimism of the day, and the real facts of existence. He was still very young.”
    Oscar Wilde, Lord Arthur Savile's Crime

  • #4
    John Cleese
    “I noticed years ago that when people (myself definitely included) are anxious they tend to busy themselves with irrelevant activities, because these distract from and therefore reduce their actual experience of anxiety. To stay perfectly still is to feel the fear at its maximum intensity, so instead you scuttle around doing things as though you are, in some mysterious way, short of time.”
    John Cleese, So, Anyway...

  • #5
    John Cleese
    “A good sense of humour is the sign of a healthy perspective, which is why people who are uncomfortable around humour are either pompous (inflated) or neurotic (oversensitive). Pompous people mistrust humour because at some level they know their self-importance cannot survive very long in such an atmosphere, so they criticise it as “negative” or “subversive.” Neurotics, sensing that humour is always ultimately critical, view it as therefore unkind and destructive, a reductio ad absurdum which leads to political correctness. Not that laughter can’t be unkind and destructive. Like most manifestations of human behaviour it ranges from the loving to the hateful. The latter produces nasty racial jokes and savage teasing; the former, warm and affectionate banter, and the kind of inclusive humour that says, “Isn’t the human condition absurd, but we’re all in the same boat.”
    John Cleese, So Anyway

  • #6
    Stephen Fry
    “It's not all bad. Heightened self-consciousness, apartness, an inability to join in, physical shame and self-loathing—they are not all bad. Those devils have been my angels. Without them I would never have disappeared into language, literature, the mind, laughter and all the mad intensities that made and unmade me.”
    Stephen Fry, Moab Is My Washpot

  • #7
    Stephen Fry
    “And then I saw him and nothing was ever the same again.

    The sky was never the same colour, the moon never the same shape: the air never smelt the same, food never tasted the same. Every word I knew changed its meaning, everything that once was stable and firm became as insubstantial as a puff of wind, and every puff of wind became a solid thing I could feel and touch.”
    Stephen Fry, Moab Is My Washpot
    tags: love

  • #8
    Stephen Fry
    “Music takes me to places of illimitable sensual and insensate joy, accessing points of ecstasy that no angelic lover could ever locate, or plunging me into gibbering weeping hells of pain that no torturer could ever devise".”
    Stephen Fry, Moab Is My Washpot

  • #9
    Stephen Fry
    “But one day he said to me:
    ‘I’ve got it now. It’s reading isn’t it?’
    ‘I’m sorry?’
    ‘You read a lot, don’t you? That’s where it all comes from. Reading. Yeah, reading.’
    The next time I saw him he had a Herman Hesse novel in his hands. I never saw him again without a book somewhere on his person. When I heard, some years later, that he had got into Cambridge I thought to myself, I know how that happened. He decided one day to read.”
    Stephen Fry, Moab Is My Washpot

  • #10
    Bob Dylan
    “And it dawned on me that I might have to change my inner thought patterns... that I would have to start believing in possibilities that I wouldn't have allowed before, that I had been closing my creativity down to a very narrow, controllable scale... that things had become too familiar and I might have to disorientate myself. p.71”
    Bob Dylan, Chronicles: Volume One

  • #11
    Michelle Magorian
    “I’d rather be happy and odd than miserable and ordinary,' she said, sticking her chin in the air.”
    Michelle Magorian, Good Night, Mr. Tom

  • #12
    Michelle Magorian
    “It occurred to him that strength was quite different from toughness and that being vulnerable wasn't quite the same as being weak.”
    Michelle Magorian, Goodnight Mister Tom

  • #13
    P.G. Wodehouse
    “We Woosters do not lightly forget. At least, we do - some things - appointments, and people's birthdays, and letters to post, and all that - but not an absolutely bally insult like the above.”
    P.G. Wodehouse, The Inimitable Jeeves

  • #14
    P.G. Wodehouse
    “Warm-hearted! I should think he has to wear asbestos vests!”
    P.G. Wodehouse, The Inimitable Jeeves
    tags: humor

  • #15
    P.G. Wodehouse
    “How does he look, Jeeves?"
    "Sir?"
    "What does Mr Bassington-Bassington look like?"
    "It is hardly my place, sir, to criticize the facial peculiarities of your friends.”
    P.G. Wodehouse, The Inimitable Jeeves:

  • #16
    P.G. Wodehouse
    “I've found, as a general rule of life, that the things you think are going to be the scaliest nearly always turn out not so bad after all.”
    P.G. Wodehouse, The Inimitable Jeeves

  • #17
    P.G. Wodehouse
    “The boy is of an outspoken disposition, and had made an opprobrious remark respecting my personal appearance."
    "What did he say about your appearance?"
    "I have forgotten, sir," said Jeeves, with a touch of austerity. "But it was opprobrious.”
    P.G. Wodehouse, The Inimitable Jeeves

  • #18
    P.G. Wodehouse
    “Good Lord, Jeeves! Is there anything you don’t know?’ ‘I couldn’t say, sir.”
    P.G. Wodehouse, The Inimitable Jeeves

  • #19
    P.G. Wodehouse
    “Jeeves," I said, "those spats."
    "Yes, sir?"
    "You really dislike them?"
    "Intensely, sir."
    "You don't think time might induce you to change your views?"
    "No, sir."
    "All right, then. Very well. Say no more. You may burn them."
    "Thank you very much, sir. I have already done so. Before breakfast this morning. A quiet grey is far more suitable, sir. Thank you, sir.”
    P G Wodehouse

  • #20
    J.R.R. Tolkien
    “It does not do to leave a live dragon out of your calculations, if you live near him.”
    J.R.R. Tolkien, The Hobbit or There and Back Again

  • #21
    J.R.R. Tolkien
    “You have nice manners for a thief and a liar," said the dragon.”
    J.R.R. Tolkien, The Hobbit or There and Back Again

  • #22
    Robert Bloch
    “I think perhaps all of us go a little crazy at times.”
    Robert Bloch, Psycho

  • #23
    Robert Bloch
    “Then she did see it there - just a face, peering through the curtains, hanging in midair like a mask. A head-scarf concealed the hair and the glassy eyes stared inhumanly, but it wasn’t a mask, it couldn’t be. The skin had been powdered dead-white and two hectic spots of rouge centered on the cheekbones. It wasn’t a mask. It was the face of a crazy old woman. Mary started to scream, and then the curtains parted further and a hand appeared, holding a butcher’s knife. It was the knife that, a moment later, cut off her scream.

    And her head.”
    Robert Bloch, Psycho

  • #24
    Robert Bloch
    “She'd thrown something at the mirror, and then the mirror broke into a thousand pieces and she knew that wasn't all; she was breaking into a thousand pieces, too.”
    Robert Bloch, Psycho

  • #25
    Robert Bloch
    “It's all right", he said, wondering at the same time why there were no better words, why there never are any better words to answer fear and grief and loneliness. "It's all right, believe me.”
    Robert Bloch, Psycho

  • #26
    George Orwell
    “Perhaps one did not want to be loved so much as to be understood.”
    George Orwell, 1984

  • #27
    George Orwell
    “Who controls the past controls the future. Who controls the present controls the past.”
    George Orwell, 1984

  • #28
    George Orwell
    “War is peace.
    Freedom is slavery.
    Ignorance is strength.”
    George Orwell, 1984

  • #29
    George Orwell
    “The best books... are those that tell you what you know already.”
    George Orwell, 1984

  • #30
    George Orwell
    “If you want to keep a secret, you must also hide it from yourself.”
    George Orwell, 1984



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