Abhijeet Melkani > Abhijeet's Quotes

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  • #1
    James Joyce
    “Pity is the feeling which arrests the mind in the presence of whatsoever is grave and constant in human sufferings and unites it with the human sufferer. Terror is the feeling which arrests the mind in the presence of whatsoever is grave and constant in human sufferings and unites it with the secret cause.”
    James Joyce, A Portrait of the Artist as a Young Man

  • #2
    James Joyce
    “You made me confess the fears that I have. But I will tell you also what I do not fear. I do not fear to be alone or to be spurned for another or to leave whatever I have to leave. And I am not afraid to make a mistake, even a great mistake, a lifelong mistake and perhaps as long as eternity too.”
    James Joyce, A Portrait of the Artist as a Young Man

  • #3
    John Fante
    “Careful, Arturo Bandini: don't strain your eyesight, remember what happened to Tarkington, remember what happened to James Joyce.”
    John Fante, Ask the Dust

  • #4
    John Fante
    “I was twenty then. What the hell, I used to say, take your time, Bandini. You got ten years to write a book, so take it easy, get out and learn about life, walk the streets. That’s your trouble: your ignorance of life.”
    John Fante, Ask the Dust

  • #5
    John Fante
    “All that was good in me thrilled in my heart at that moment, all that I hoped for in the profound, obscure meaning of my existence. Here was the endlessly mute placidity of nature, indifferent to the great city; here was the desert beneath these streets, around these streets, waiting for the city to die, to cover it with timeless sand once more. There came over me a terrifying sense of understanding about the meaning and the pathetic destiny of men. The desert was always there, a patient white animal, waiting for men to die, for civilizations to flicker and pass into the darkness. Then men seemed brave to me, and I was proud to be numbered among them. All the evil of the world seemed not evil at all, but inevitable and good and part of that endless struggle to keep the desert down.”
    John Fante, Ask the Dust

  • #6
    Salman Rushdie
    “Go for broke. Always try and do too much. Dispense with safety nets. Take a deep breath before you begin talking. Aim for the stars. Keep grinning. Be bloody-minded. Argue with the world. And never forget that writing is as close as we get to keeping a hold on the thousand and one things--childhood, certainties, cities, doubts, dreams, instants, phrases, parents, loves--that go on slipping , like sand, through our fingers.”
    Salman Rushdie, Imaginary Homelands: Essays and Criticism 1981-1991

  • #7
    Czesław Miłosz
    “In a room where
    people unanimously maintain
    a conspiracy of silence,
    one word of truth
    sounds like a pistol shot.”
    Czesław Miłosz

  • #8
    Czesław Miłosz
    “Not that I want to be a god or a hero. Just to change into a tree, grow for ages, not hurt anyone.”
    Czeslaw Milosz

  • #9
    Czesław Miłosz
    “Language is the only homeland.”
    Czesław Miłosz

  • #10
    Czesław Miłosz
    “A true opium of the people is a belief in nothingness after death - the huge solace of thinking that for our betrayals, greed, cowardice, murders we are not going to be judged.”
    Czeslaw Milosz

  • #11
    Czesław Miłosz
    “What has no shadow has no strength to live.”
    Czeslaw Milosz

  • #12
    Czesław Miłosz
    “The voice of passion is better than the voice of reason. The passionless cannot change history.”
    Czesław Miłosz

  • #13
    Czesław Miłosz
    “I was not meant to live anywhere except in Paradise.
    Such, simply, was my genetic inadaptation.
    Here on earth every prick of a rose-thorn changed into a wound. When the sun hid behind a cloud, I grieved.
    I pretended to work like others from morning to evening, but I was absent, dedicated to invisible countries.”
    Czeslaw Milosz

  • #14
    Czesław Miłosz
    “The true enemy of man is generalization.”
    Czesław Miłosz, Testimony to the Invisible: Essays on Swedenborg

  • #15
    Czesław Miłosz
    “No duties. I don’t have to be profound.
    I don’t have to be artistically perfect.
    Or sublime. Or edifying.
    I just wander. I say: ‘You were running,
    That’s fine. It was the thing to do.’
    And now the music of the worlds transforms me.
    My planet enters a different house.
    Trees and lawns become more distinct.
    Philosophies one after another go out.
    Everything is lighter yet not less odd.
    Sauces, wine vintages, dishes of meat.
    We talk a little of district fairs,
    Of travels in a covered wagon with a cloud of dust behind,
    Of how rivers once were, what the scent of calamus is.
    That’s better than examining one’s private dreams.
    And meanwhile it has arrived. It’s here, invisible.
    Who can guess how it got here, everywhere.
    Let others take care of it. Time for me to play hooky.
    Buena notte. Ciao. Farewell.”
    Czesław Miłosz

  • #16
    Czesław Miłosz
    “Religion used to be the opium of the people. To those suffering humiliation, pain, illness, and serfdom, religion promised the reward of an after life. But now, we are witnessing a transformation, a true opium of the people is the belief in nothingness after death, the huge solace, the huge comfort of thinking that for our betrayals, our greed, our cowardice, our murders, we are not going to be judged.”
    Czesław Miłosz

  • #17
    Czesław Miłosz
    “I imagine the earth when I am no more:
    Women's dresses, dewy lilacs, a song in the valley.
    Yet the books will be there on the shelves, well born,
    Derived from people, but also from radiance, heights.”
    Czeslaw Milosz

  • #18
    Czesław Miłosz
    “Irony is the glory of slaves.”
    Czeslaw Milosz

  • #19
    R. Buckminster Fuller
    “We should do away with the absolutely specious notion that everybody has to earn a living. It is a fact today that one in ten thousand of us can make a technological breakthrough capable of supporting all the rest. The youth of today are absolutely right in recognizing this nonsense of earning a living. We keep inventing jobs because of this false idea that everybody has to be employed at some kind of drudgery because, according to Malthusian Darwinian theory he must justify his right to exist. So we have inspectors of inspectors and people making instruments for inspectors to inspect inspectors. The true business of people should be to go back to school and think about whatever it was they were thinking about before somebody came along and told them they had to earn a living.”
    Buckminster Fuller

  • #20
    Marcel Proust
    “This was many years ago. The staircase wall on which I saw the rising glimmer of his candle has long since ceased to exist. In me, too, many things have been destroyed that I thought were bound to last forever and new ones have formed that have given birth to new sorrows and joys which I could not have foreseen then, just as the old ones have been difficult for me to understand. It was a very long time ago, too, that my father ceased to be able to say to Mama, “Go with the boy.” The possibility of such hours will never be reborn for me.”
    Marcel Proust, Swann's Way
    tags: memory

  • #21
    James Joyce
    “His heart danced upon her movements like a cork upon a tide. He heard what her eyes said to him from beneath their cowl and knew that in some dim past, whether in life or revery, he had heard their tale before.”
    James Joyce, A Portrait of the Artist as a Young Man

  • #22
    James Joyce
    “I will tell you what I will do and what I will not do. I will not serve that in which I no longer believe, whether it calls itself my home, my fatherland, or my church: and I will try to express myself in some mode of life or art as freely as I can and as wholly as I can, using for my defense the only arms I allow myself to use -- silence, exile, and cunning.”
    James Joyce, A Portrait of the Artist as a Young Man

  • #23
    James Joyce
    “When a man is born...there are nets flung at it to hold it back from flight. You talk to me of nationality, language, religion. I shall try to fly by those nets.”
    James Joyce, A Portrait of the Artist as a Young Man

  • #24
    James Joyce
    “The soul ... has a slow and dark birth, more mysterious than the birth of the body. When the soul of a man is born in this country there are nets flung at it to hold it back from flight. You talk to me of nationality, language, religion. I shall try to fly by those nets.”
    James Joyce, A Portrait of the Artist as a Young Man

  • #25
    James Joyce
    “The soul is born, he said vaguely, first in those moments I told you of. It has a slow and dark birth, more mysterious than the birth of the body. When the soul of a man is born in this country there are nets flung at it to hold it back from flight. You talk to me of nationality, language, religion. I shall try to fly by those nets.”
    James Joyce, A Portrait of the Artist as a Young Man

  • #26
    James Joyce
    “And if he had judged her harshly? If her life were a simple rosary of hours, her life simple and strange as a bird's life, gay in the morning, restless all day, tired at sundown? Her heart simple and willful as a bird's heart?”
    James Joyce, A Portrait of the Artist as a Young Man

  • #27
    George Orwell
    “Who controls the past controls the future. Who controls the present controls the past.”
    George Orwell, 1984

  • #28
    George Orwell
    “But if thought corrupts language, language can also corrupt thought.”
    George Orwell, 1984

  • #29
    George Orwell
    “Now I will tell you the answer to my question. It is this. The Party seeks power entirely for its own sake. We are not interested in the good of others; we are interested solely in power, pure power. What pure power means you will understand presently. We are different from the oligarchies of the past in that we know what we are doing. All the others, even those who resembled ourselves, were cowards and hypocrites. The German Nazis and the Russian Communists came very close to us in their methods, but they never had the courage to recognize their own motives. They pretended, perhaps they even believed, that they had seized power unwillingly and for a limited time, and that just around the corner there lay a paradise where human beings would be free and equal. We are not like that. We know that no one ever seizes power with the intention of relinquishing it. Power is not a means; it is an end. One does not establish a dictatorship in order to safeguard a revolution; one makes the revolution in order to establish the dictatorship. The object of persecution is persecution. The object of torture is torture. The object of power is power. Now you begin to understand me.”
    George Orwell, 1984

  • #30
    George Orwell
    “If you loved someone, you loved him, and when you had nothing else to give, you still gave him love.”
    George Orwell, 1984



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