Sabrina Eads > Sabrina's Quotes

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  • #1
    L.M. Montgomery
    “Fear is the original sin. Almost all of the evil in the world has its origin in the fact that some one is afraid of something.It is a cold slimy serpent coiling about you. It is horrible to live with fear; and it is of all things degrading.”
    Lucy Maud Montgomery, The Blue Castle
    tags: fear

  • #2
    Daryl Gregory
    “..."I might be entertaining the idea of tamping down my nihilism. Just a bit. Not because life is not meaningless—I think that’s inarguable. It’s just that the constant awareness of its pointlessness is exhausting. I wouldn’t mind being oblivious again. I’d love to feel the wind in my face and think, just for minute, that I’m not going to crash into the rocks.”

    “You’re saying you’d like to be happy.”
    Daryl Gregory, We Are All Completely Fine

  • #3
    Daryl Gregory
    “She believed that people were captains of their own destiny. He agreed, as long as it was understood that every captain was destined to go down with the ship, and there wasn't a damned thing you could do about it.”
    Daryl Gregory, We Are All Completely Fine

  • #4
    Daryl Gregory
    “Everything beautiful hurts.”
    Daryl Gregory, We Are All Completely Fine

  • #5
    Daryl Gregory
    “He wondered what the collective noun was for psychologists: a shortage of shrinks? A confession of counsellors?”
    Daryl Gregory, We Are All Completely Fine

  • #6
    Daryl Gregory
    “We’re different from other people, she’d said. We only feel at home when we’re a little bit afraid.”
    Daryl Gregory, We Are All Completely Fine

  • #7
    Daryl Gregory
    “A monster crosses over into the everyday world. The mortals struggle and show great courage, but it’s no use. The monster kills first the guilty, then the innocent, until finally only one remains. The Last Boy, the Last Girl. There is a final battle. The Last One suffers great wounds, but in the final moment vanquishes the monster. Only later does he or she recognize that this is the monster’s final trick; the scars run deep, and the awareness of the truth grows like an infection. The Last One knows that the monster isn’t dead, only sent to the other side. There it waits until it can slip into the mundane world again. Perhaps next time it will be a knife-wielding madman, or a fanged beast, or some nameless tentacled thing. It’s the monster with a thousand faces. The details matter only to the next victims.”
    Daryl Gregory, We Are All Completely Fine

  • #8
    Matthew Quick
    “My life will get better? You really believe that?" I ask.
    “It can. If you’re willing to do the work.”
    “What work?”
    “Not letting the world destroy you. That’s a daily battle.”
    Matthew Quick, Forgive Me, Leonard Peacock

  • #9
    Matthew Quick
    “How do you measure suffering? I mean, the fact that I live in a democratic country doesn’t guarantee my life will be problem-free. Far from it. I understand that I am relatively privileged from a socioeconomical viewpoint, but so was Hamlet—so are a lot of miserable people. I bet there are people in Iran who are happier than I am—who wish to keep living there regardless of who is in charge politically, while I’m miserable here in this supposedly free country and just want out of this life at any cost.”
    Matthew Quick, Forgive Me, Leonard Peacock

  • #10
    Matthew Quick
    “It was like once again someone was labeling me and putting me in a box just as soon I expressed myself.”
    Matthew Quick, Forgive Me, Leonard Peacock

  • #11
    Matthew Quick
    “The Nike swoop, the three Adidas stripes, the little Polo player on a horse, the Hollister seagull, the symbols of Philadelphia's professional sports teams, even our high school mascot that you athletes wear to battle other schools - some of you wear our Mustang to class even when there is no sporting event scheduled. These are your symbols, what you wear to prove that your identity matches the identity of others. Much like the Nazis had their swastika.”
    Matthew Quick, Forgive Me, Leonard Peacock

  • #12
    Matthew Quick
    “Maybe if we would just picture our enemies jerking off once in a while, the world would be a better place.”
    Matthew Quick, Forgive Me, Leonard Peacock

  • #13
    Matthew Quick
    “Why is it that we love surprising people? Is it because we like to know something they don't Does it give us a sense of power over others? Was I happy because I was controlling Asher? Or was I simply trying to do something nice?”
    Matthew Quick, Forgive Me, Leonard Peacock

  • #14
    Matthew Quick
    “Stop a stranger and ask her to explain her greatest fears and her secret hopes and aspirations in detail and then tell her you care because she is a human being.”
    Matthew Quick, Forgive Me, Leonard Peacock

  • #15
    Matthew Quick
    “He was trying to make us think about how life is hard and people suffer in all sorts of ways without our adding to their suffering to satisfy our sense of vengeance, but I sort of don’t think that the quote holds up in the real world, where literature and schooling and philosophy and morality don’t exist, because Asher and Linda and so many other culpable people seem to be fine—functioning exceptionally well within the world even—while I’m under a disgusting bridge about to put a hole in my skull.”
    Matthew Quick, Forgive Me, Leonard Peacock

  • #16
    Matthew Quick
    “I concoct that deal in my head and then attempt to make her fulfill her end of the unspoken bargain.”
    Matthew Quick, Forgive Me, Leonard Peacock

  • #17
    Lindy West
    “Feminism is really just the long slow realization that the things you love hate you.”
    Lindy West, Shrill: Notes from a Loud Woman

  • #18
    Lindy West
    “I reject the notion that thinness is the goal, that thin = better—that I am an unfinished thing and that my life can really start when I lose weight. That then I will be a real person and have finally succeeded as a woman. I am not going to waste another second of my life thinking about this. I don’t want to have another fucking conversation with another fucking woman about what she’s eating or not eating or regrets eating or pretends to not regret eating to mask the regret. OOPS I JUST YAWNED TO DEATH.”
    Lindy West, Shrill: Notes from a Loud Woman

  • #19
    Lindy West
    “Denying people access to value is an incredibly insidious form of emotional violence, one that our culture wields aggressively and liberally to keep marginalized groups small and quiet.”
    Lindy West, Shrill: Notes from a Loud Woman

  • #20
    Lindy West
    “Loving yourself is not antithetical to health, it is intrinsic to health. You can't take good care of a thing you hate.”
    Lindy West, Shrill: Notes from a Loud Woman

  • #21
    Lindy West
    “Please don’t forget: I am my body. When my body gets smaller, it is still me. When my body gets bigger, it is still me. There is not a thin woman inside me, awaiting excavation. I am one piece.”
    Lindy West, Shrill: Notes from a Loud Woman

  • #22
    Lindy West
    “Maybe you are thin. You hiked that trail and you are fit and beautiful and wanted and I am so proud of you, I am so in awe of your wiry brightness; and I'm miles behind you, my breathing ragged. But you didn't carry this up the mountain, You only carried yourself. How hard would you breathe if you had to carry me? You couldn't. But I can.”
    Lindy West, Shrill: Notes from a Loud Woman

  • #23
    Lindy West
    “The real scam is that being bones isn’t enough either. The game is rigged. There is no perfection.”
    Lindy West, Shrill: Notes from a Loud Woman

  • #24
    Lindy West
    “The idea that we can somehow escape affecting each other is deeply conservative. Barbarous, even.”
    Lindy West, Shrill: Notes from a Loud Woman

  • #25
    Lindy West
    “Every human being is a wet, gassy katamari of triumphs, traumas, scars, coping mechanisms, parental baggage, weird stuff you saw on the Internet too young, pressure from your grandma to take over the bodega when what you really want to do is dance, and all the other fertilizer that makes a smear of DNA grow into a fully formed toxic avenger.”
    Lindy West, Shrill: Notes from a Loud Woman

  • #26
    Lindy West
    “In the omnidirectional orgy gardens of Vlaxnoid 7, no one cares about your arm flab.”
    Lindy West, Shrill: Notes from a Loud Woman

  • #27
    Lindy West
    “Sincerity is an easy target, but I don’t want to excise sincerity from my life – that’s a lonely way to live.”
    Lindy West, Shrill: Notes from a Loud Woman

  • #28
    Lindy West
    “Fat people already are ashamed. It's taken care of. No further manpower needed on the shame front, thx. I am not concerned with whether or not fat people can change their bodies through self-discipline and "choices." Pretty much all of them have tried already. A couple of them have succeeded. Whatever. My question is, what if they try and try and try and still fail? What if they are still fat? What if they are fat forever? What do you do with them then? Do you really want millions of teenage girls to feel like they're trapped in unsightly lard prisons that are ruining their lives, and on top of that it's because of their own moral failure, and on top of that they are ruining America with the terribly expensive diabetes that they don't even have yet? You know what's shameful? A complete lack of empathy.”
    Lindy West, Shrill: Notes from a Loud Woman

  • #29
    Lindy West
    “If you’re the very luckiest kind of astronaut ever, your big payoff is that you get to visit a barren airless wasteland for five minutes, do some more math, and then go home—ice cream not guaranteed.”
    Lindy West, Shrill: Notes from a Loud Woman

  • #30
    Lindy West
    “I sometimes think of people’s personalities as the negative space around their insecurities. Afraid of intimacy? Cultivate aloofness. Feel invisible? Laugh loud and often. Drink too much? Play the gregarious basket case. Hate your body? Slash and burn others so you can climb up the pile. We construct elaborate palaces to hide our vulnerabilities, often growing into caricatures of what we fear. The goal is to move through the world without anyone knowing quite where to dig a thumb. It’s a survival instinct. When people know how to hurt you, they know how to control you. But”
    Lindy West, Shrill: Notes from a Loud Woman



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