Jessica > Jessica's Quotes

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  • #1
    Anne Fadiman
    “If you truly love a book, you should sleep with it, write in it, read aloud from it, and fill its pages with muffin crumbs.”
    Anne Fadiman

  • #2
    Anne Fadiman
    “My daughter is seven, and some of the other second-grade parents complain that their children don't read for pleasure. When I visit their homes, the children's rooms are crammed with expensive books, but the parent's rooms are empty. Those children do not see their parents reading, as I did every day of my childhood. By contrast, when I walk into an apartment with books on the shelves, books on the bedside tables, books on the floor, and books on the toilet tank, then I know what I would see if I opened the door that says 'PRIVATE--GROWNUPS KEEP OUT': a child sprawled on the bed, reading.”
    Anne Fadiman, Ex Libris: Confessions of a Common Reader

  • #3
    Mark Twain
    “I have never let my schooling interfere with my education.”
    Mark Twain

  • #4
    T.H. White
    “The best thing for being sad," replied Merlin, beginning to puff and blow, "is to learn something. That's the only thing that never fails. You may grow old and trembling in your anatomies, you may lie awake at night listening to the disorder of your veins, you may miss your only love, you may see the world about you devastated by evil lunatics, or know your honour trampled in the sewers of baser minds. There is only one thing for it then — to learn. Learn why the world wags and what wags it. That is the only thing which the mind can never exhaust, never alienate, never be tortured by, never fear or distrust, and never dream of regretting. Learning is the only thing for you. Look what a lot of things there are to learn.”
    T.H. White, The Once and Future King

  • #5
    Leonardo da Vinci
    “Study without desire spoils the memory, and it retains nothing that it takes in.”
    Leonardo da Vinci

  • #6
    George Bernard Shaw
    “Make it a rule never to give a child a book you would not read yourself.”
    George Bernard Shaw

  • #7
    Isabel Allende
    “Accept the children the way we accept trees—with gratitude, because they are a blessing—but do not have expectations or desires. You don’t expect trees to change, you love them as they are.”
    Isabel Allende

  • #8
    Rainer Maria Rilke
    “May what I do flow from me like a river, no forcing and no holding back, the way it is with children.”
    Rainer Maria Rilke

  • #9
    Anne Fadiman
    “I can think of few better ways to introduce a child to books than to let her stack them, upend them, rearrange them, and get her fingerprints all over them.”
    Anne Fadiman, Ex Libris: Confessions of a Common Reader

  • #10
    Eudora Welty
    “Long before I wrote stories, I listened for stories. Listening for them is something more acute than listening to them. I suppose it’s an early form of participation in what goes on. Listening children know stories are there. When their elders sit and begin, children are just waiting and hoping for one to come out, like a mouse from its hole.”
    Eudora Welty, One Writer's Beginnings

  • #11
    Jane Goodall
    “One thing I had learned from watching chimpanzees with their infants is that having a child should be fun.”
    Jane Goodall

  • #12
    Mahatma Gandhi
    “Happiness is when what you think, what you say, and what you do are in harmony.”
    Mahatma Gandhi

  • #13
    “The grand essentials to happiness in this life are something to do, something to love, and something to hope for.”
    George Washington Burnap, The Sphere and Duties of Woman: A Course of Lectures

  • #14
    Russell Shorto
    “The Dutch were among the earliest adopters of a new technology—the printed book—and”
    Russell Shorto, Amsterdam: A History of the World's Most Liberal City

  • #15
    Russell Shorto
    “Where land was controlled by noblemen and/or the Church in other parts of Europe, in the province of Holland, circa 1500, only 5 percent of the land was owned by nobles, while peasants owned 45 percent of it.”
    Russell Shorto, Amsterdam: A History of the World's Most Liberal City



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