Gloria > Gloria's Quotes

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  • #1
    Margaret Mead
    “We are continually faced with great opportunities which are brilliantly disguised as unsolvable problems.”
    Margaret Mead

  • #1
    George Orwell
    “[...] you can get anything in this world if you genuinely don't want it.”
    George Orwell, Keep the Aspidistra Flying

  • #2
    Margaret Mead
    “If we are to achieve a richer culture, rich in contrasting values, we must recognize the whole gamut of human potentialities, and so weave a less arbitrary social fabric, one in which each diverse gift will find a fitting place.”
    Margaret Mead

  • #2
    Amartya Sen
    “A society can be Pareto optimal and still perfectly disgusting.”
    Amartya Sen

  • #3
    Margaret Mead
    “No society has ever yet been able to handle the temptations of technology to mastery, to waste, to exuberance, to exploration and exploitation. We have to learn to cherish this earth and cherish it as something that's fragile, that's only one, it's all we have. We have to use our scientific knowledge to correct the dangers that have come from science and technology.”
    Margaret Mead

  • #4
    Margaret Mead
    “The notion that we are products of our environment is our greatest sin; we are products of our choices."
    Margaret Mead
    (this may not be her exact wording, but it's close enough).”
    Margaret Mead

  • #5
    William T. Vollmann
    “Rising up, rising down! History shambles on! What are we left with? A few half-shattered Greek stelae; Trotsky's eyeglasses; Gandhi's native-spun cloth, Cortes' pieces of solid gold (extorted from their original owner, Montezuma); a little heap of orange peels left on the table by the late Robespierre; John Brown's lengthily underlined letters; Lenin's bottles of invisible ink; one of Di Giovanni's suitcases, with an iron cylinder of gelignite and two glass tubes of acid inside; the Constitution of the Ku Klux Klan; a bruised ear (Napoleon pinched it with loving condescension)... And dead bodies, of course. (They sing about John Brown's body.) Memoirs, manifestoes, civil codes, trial proceedings, photographs, statues, weapons now aestheticized by that selfsame history - the sword of Frederick the Great, and God knows what else. Then dust blows out of fresh graves, and the orange peels go grey, sink, wither, rot away. Sooner or later, every murder becomes quaint. Charlemagne hanged four and a half thousand "rebels" in a single day, but he has achieved a storybook benevolence. And that's only natural: historiography begins after the orange has been sucked,; the peeler believes in the "great and beautiful things," or wants to believe; easy for us to believe likewise, since dust reduced truth and counterfeit to the same greyness - caveat emptor. But ends remain fresh, and means remain inexplicable. Rising up and rising down! And whom shall I save, and who is my enemy, and who is my neighbor?”
    William T. Vollmann

  • #7
    Thomas Mann
    “He thought what a fine thing it was that people made music all over the world, even in the strangest settings – probably even on polar expeditions.”
    Thomas Mann, The Magic Mountain

  • #8
    Margaret Mead
    “Women want mediocre men, and men are working hard to become as mediocre as possible.”
    Margaret Mead

  • #9
    Victor Hugo
    “He never went out without a book under his arm, and he often came back with two.”
    Victor Hugo, Les Misérables

  • #11
    William  James
    “The means have murdered the end.”
    William James
    tags: life

  • #11
    William  James
    “Now, my dear little girl, you have come to an age when the inward life develops and when some people (and on the whole those who have most of a destiny) find that all is not a bed of roses. Among other things there will be waves of terrible sadness, which last sometimes for days; irritation, insensibility, etc., etc., which taken together form a melancholy. Now, painful as it is, this is sent to us for an enlightenment. It always passes off, and we learn about life from it, and we ought to learn a great many good things if we react on it right. (For instance, you learn how good a thing your home is, and your country, and your brothers, and you may learn to be more considerate of other people, who, you now learn, may have their inner weaknesses and sufferings, too.) Many persons take a kind of sickly delight in hugging it; and some sentimental ones may even be proud of it, as showing a fine sorrowful kind of sensibility. Such persons make a regular habit of the luxury of woe. That is the worst possible reaction on it. It is usually a sort of disease, when we get it strong, arising from the organism having generated some poison in the blood; and we mustn't submit to it an hour longer than we can help, but jump at every chance to attend to anything cheerful or comic or take part in anything active that will divert us from our mean, pining inward state of feeling. When it passes off, as I said, we know more than we did before. And we must try to make it last as short as time as possible. The worst of it often is that, while we are in it, we don't want to get out of it. We hate it, and yet we prefer staying in it—that is a part of the disease. If we find ourselves like that, we must make something ourselves to some hard work, make ourselves sweat, etc.; and that is the good way of reacting that makes of us a valuable character. The disease makes you think of yourself all the time; and the way out of it is to keep as busy as we can thinking of things and of other people—no matter what's the matter with our self.”
    William James

  • #13
    David McCullough
    “Once upon a time in the dead of winter in the Dakota Territory, Theodore Roosevelt took off in a makeshift boat down the Little Missouri River in pursuit of a couple of thieves who had stolen his prized rowboat. After several days on the river, he caught up and got the draw on them with his trusty Winchester, at which point they surrendered. Then Roosevelt set off in a borrowed wagon to haul the thieves cross-country to justice. They headed across the snow-covered wastes of the Badlands to the railhead at Dickinson, and Roosevelt walked the whole way, the entire 40 miles. It was an astonishing feat, what might be called a defining moment in Roosevelt’s eventful life. But what makes it especially memorable is that during that time, he managed to read all of Anna Karenina. I often think of that when I hear people say they haven’t time to read.”
    David McCullough

  • #14
    William  James
    “I will act as if what i do makes a difference.”
    William James

  • #15
    William  James
    “I know that you, ladies and gentlemen, have a philosophy, each and all of you, and that the most interesting and important thing about you is the way in which it determines the perspective in your several worlds.”
    William James, Pragmatism: A New Name for Some Old Ways of Thinking

  • #16
    William  James
    “There is no doubt that healthy-mindedness is inadequate as a philosophical doctrine, because the evil facts which it positively refuses to account for are a genuine portion of reality; and they may after all be the best key to life's significance, and possibly the only openers of our eyes to the deepest levels of truth.”
    William James

  • #17
    David McRaney
    “To be sure, you would like to live in a world where people in white hats bring people in black hats to justice, but you don't.
    Don't let this discourage you, though. You can accept that life is unfair and still relish it. You aren't in total control of your life, but there is a nice big chunk of your life over which you have complete authority--beat that part to a pulp. Just remember the unfair nature of the world, the randomness of birthright, means people often suffer adversity and enjoy opulence through no effort of their own. If you think the world is just and fair, people who need help may never get it. Realize that even though we are all responsible for our actions, the blame for evil acts rests on the perpetrator and never the victim. No one deserves to be raped or bullied, robbed or murdered. To make the world more just and fair, you have to make it harder for evil to thrive, and you can't do this just by reducing the number of its potential targets.”
    David McRaney, You Are Not So Smart: Why You Have Too Many Friends on Facebook, Why Your Memory Is Mostly Fiction, and 46 Other Ways You're Deluding Yourself

  • #18
    David McRaney
    “The future is the result of actions, and actions are the result of behavior, and behavior is the result of prediction.”
    David McRaney, You Are Not So Smart: Why You Have Too Many Friends on Facebook, Why Your Memory Is Mostly Fiction, and 46 Other Ways You're Deluding Yourself

  • #19
    Raymond Williams
    “[T]here are in fact no masses, but only ways of seeing people as masses.”
    Raymond Williams, Resources of Hope: Culture, Democracy, Socialism

  • #20
    “Optimism is a political act. Those who benefit from the status quo are perfectly happy for us to think nothing is going to get any better. In fact, these days, cynicism is obedience.”
    Alex Steffen

  • #21
    Philip K. Dick
    “Reality is that which, when you stop believing in it, doesn't go away.”
    Philip K. Dick, I Hope I Shall Arrive Soon

  • #22
    You never change things by fighting the existing reality. To change something, build a new
    “You never change things by fighting the existing reality.
    To change something, build a new model that makes the existing model obsolete.”
    Buckminster Fuller

  • #23
    R. Buckminster Fuller
    “We should do away with the absolutely specious notion that everybody has to earn a living. It is a fact today that one in ten thousand of us can make a technological breakthrough capable of supporting all the rest. The youth of today are absolutely right in recognizing this nonsense of earning a living. We keep inventing jobs because of this false idea that everybody has to be employed at some kind of drudgery because, according to Malthusian Darwinian theory he must justify his right to exist. So we have inspectors of inspectors and people making instruments for inspectors to inspect inspectors. The true business of people should be to go back to school and think about whatever it was they were thinking about before somebody came along and told them they had to earn a living.”
    Buckminster Fuller

  • #24
    R. Buckminster Fuller
    “There is nothing in a caterpillar that tells you it's going to be a butterfly.”
    Buckminster R. Fuller

  • #25
    R. Buckminster Fuller
    “If you want to teach people a new way of thinking, don't bother trying to teach them. Instead, give them a tool, the use of which will lead to new ways of thinking.”
    Richard Buckminster Fuller

  • #26
    R. Buckminster Fuller
    “The minute you choose to do what you really want to do,
    it's a different kind of life.”
    Buckminster Fuller

  • #27
    John Cage
    “The first question I ask myself when something doesn't seem to be beautiful is why do I think it's not beautiful. And very shortly you discover that there is no reason.”
    John Cage

  • #28
    Abraham Lincoln
    “If this is coffee, please bring me some tea; but if this is tea, please bring me some coffee.”
    Abraham Lincoln

  • #29
    John Cage
    “If something is boring after two minutes, try it for four. If still boring, then eight. Then sixteen. Then thirty-two. Eventually one discovers that it is not boring at all.”
    John Cage

  • #30
    Jules Renard
    “The peasant is the only species of human being who doesn't like the country and never looks at it.”
    Jules Renard



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