Christopher Brehm > Christopher's Quotes

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  • #1
    J.R.R. Tolkien
    “All's well that ends better.”
    J.R.R. Tolkien, The Lord of the Rings

  • #2
    J.R.R. Tolkien
    “I will not say: do not weep; for not all tears are an evil.”
    J.R.R. Tolkien, The Return of the King

  • #3
    J.R.R. Tolkien
    “I wish it need not have happened in my time," said Frodo.
    "So do I," said Gandalf, "and so do all who live to see such times. But that is not for them to decide. All we have to decide is what to do with the time that is given us.”
    J.R.R. Tolkien, The Fellowship of the Ring

  • #4
    J.R.R. Tolkien
    “I don't know half of you half as well as I should like; and I like less than half of you half as well as you deserve.”
    J.R.R. Tolkien, The Fellowship of the Ring

  • #5
    J.R.R. Tolkien
    “In sorrow we must go, but not in despair. Behold! we are not bound for ever to the circles of the world, and beyond them is more than memory.”
    J.R.R. Tolkien

  • #6
    J.R.R. Tolkien
    “I warn you, if you bore me, I shall take my revenge.”
    J.R.R. Tolkien

  • #7
    J.R.R. Tolkien
    “He that breaks a thing to find out what it is has left the path of wisdom.”
    J.R.R. Tolkien, The Fellowship of the Ring

  • #8
    J.R.R. Tolkien
    “You can only come to the morning through the shadows.”
    J.R.R. Tolkien

  • #9
    J.R.R. Tolkien
    “May it be a light to you in dark places, when all other lights go out.”
    J.R.R. Tolkien, The Fellowship of the Ring

  • #10
    J.R.R. Tolkien
    “For like a shaft, clear and cold, the thought pierced him that in the end the Shadow was only a small and passing thing: there was light and high beauty for ever beyond its reach.”
    J.R.R. Tolkien, The Return of the King

  • #11
    J.R.R. Tolkien
    “I am glad you are here with me. Here at the end of all things, Sam.”
    J.R.R. Tolkien, The Return of the King

  • #12
    Nathaniel Hawthorne
    “A single dream is more powerful than a thousand realities.”
    Nathaniel Hawthorne, Fanshawe

  • #13
    J.R.R. Tolkien
    “Fantasy is escapist, and that is its glory. If a soldier is imprisioned by the enemy, don't we consider it his duty to escape?. . .If we value the freedom of mind and soul, if we're partisans of liberty, then it's our plain duty to escape, and to take as many people with us as we can!”
    J.R.R. Tolkien

  • #14
    Timothy J. Keller
    “...God's grace and forgiveness, while free to the recipient, are always costly for the giver.... From the earliest parts of the Bible, it was understood that God could not forgive without sacrifice. No one who is seriously wronged can "just forgive" the perpetrator.... But when you forgive, that means you absorb the loss and the debt. You bear it yourself. All forgiveness, then, is costly.”
    Timothy Keller

  • #15
    Timothy J. Keller
    “If you know what He has done at infinite cost to himself—He’s put you into a relationship so that you’ll never be rejected by Him—then your motivation when you sin is to go get Him. You want fellowship with Him. When the thing that most assures you is the thing that most convicts you, you’ll be okay because when you’re convicted of sin in a gospel way it drives you toward God.

    Without the gospel we hate ourselves instead of our sin. Without the gospel we’re motivated through all sorts of awful fear and pride to change and it doesn’t really change our hearts; it just restrains our hearts.”
    Timothy Keller

  • #16
    Timothy J. Keller
    “We modern people think of miracles as the suspension of the natural order, but Jesus meant them to be the restoration of the natural order. The Bible tells us that God did not originally make the world to have disease, hunger, and death in it. Jesus has come to redeem where it is wrong and heal the world where it is broken. His miracles are not just proofs that he has power but also wonderful foretastes of what he is going to do with that power. Jesus' miracles are not just a challenge to our minds, but a promise to our hearts, that the world we all want is coming.”
    Timothy Keller, The Reason for God: Belief in an Age of Skepticism

  • #17
    Timothy J. Keller
    “If you want God's grace, all you need is need, all you need is nothing. But that kind of spiritual humility is hard to muster. We come to God saying, "Look at all I've done," or maybe "Look at all I've suffered." God, however, wants us to look to him - to just wash.”
    Timothy Keller, Counterfeit Gods: The Empty Promises of Money, Sex, and Power, and the Only Hope that Matters

  • #18
    Timothy J. Keller
    “Fear-based repentance makes us hate ourselves. Joy-based repentance makes us hate the sin.”
    Timothy Keller, Counterfeit Gods: The Empty Promises of Money, Sex, and Power, and the Only Hope that Matters

  • #19
    Timothy J. Keller
    “Love without truth is sentimentality; it supports and affirms us but keeps us in denial about our flaws. Truth without love is harshness; it gives us information but in such a way that we cannot really hear it. God's saving love in Christ, however, is marked by both radical truthfulness about who we are and yet also radical, unconditional commitment to us. The merciful commitment strengthens us to see the truth about ourselves and repent. The conviction and repentance moves us to cling to and rest in God's mercy and grace.”
    Timothy Keller, The Meaning of Marriage: Facing the Complexities of Commitment with the Wisdom of God
    tags: god, love

  • #20
    Timothy J. Keller
    “To the degree you experience God's love towards you - seeing you as beautiful and radiant - to that degree sex won't ruin your life.”
    Timothy Keller

  • #21
    Timothy J. Keller
    “If the evolutionary mechanism of natural selection depends on death, destruction, and violence of the strong against the weak, then these things are perfectly natural. On what basis, then, does the atheist judge the natural world to be horribly wrong, unfair, and unjust?”
    Dr. Timothy Keller

  • #22
    Timothy J. Keller
    “All change comes from deepening your understanding of the salvation of Christ and living out the changes that understanding creates in your heart.”
    Tim Keller

  • #23
    Timothy J. Keller
    “When we look at the whole scope of this story line, we see clearly that Christianity is not only about getting one’s individual sins forgiven so we can go to heaven. That is an important means of God’s salvation, but not the final end or purpose of it. The purpose of Jesus’s coming is to put the whole world right, to renew and restore the creation, not to escape it. It is not just to bring personal forgiveness and peace, but also justice and shalom to the world. God created both the body and soul, and the resurrection of Jesus shows that he is going to redeem both body and soul. The work of the Spirit of God is not only to save souls but also to care and cultivate the face of the earth, the material world.”
    Timothy Keller, The Reason for God: Belief in an Age of Skepticism

  • #24
    Timothy J. Keller
    “The early church was strikingly different from the culture around it in this way - the pagan society was stingy with its money and promiscuous with its body. A pagan gave nobody their money and practically gave everybody their body. And the Christians came along and gave practically nobody their body and they gave practically everybody their money.”
    Timothy Keller

  • #25
    Timothy J. Keller
    “Friendship is a deep oneness that develops when two people, speaking the truth in love to one another, journey together to the same horizon.”
    Timothy Keller, The Meaning of Marriage: Facing the Complexities of Commitment with the Wisdom of God

  • #26
    Timothy J. Keller
    “If you try to add to God's salvation you subtract. If you try to add to God's salvation you subtract. If you try to merit God's salvation you haven't believed at all, even if you try to do a little bit.”
    Timothy Keller

  • #27
    Timothy J. Keller
    “John Frame’s ‘tri-perspectivalism’ helps me understand Willow. The Willow Creek style churches have a ‘kingly’ emphasis on leadership, strategic thinking, and wise administration. The danger there is that the mechanical obscures how organic and spontaneous church life can be. The Reformed churches have a ‘prophetic’ emphasis on preaching, teaching, and doctrine. The danger there is that we can have a naïve and unBiblical view that, if we just expound the Word faithfully, everything else in the church — leader development, community building, stewardship of resources, unified vision — will just happen by themselves. The emerging churches have a ‘priestly’ emphasis on community, liturgy and sacraments, service and justice. The danger there is to view ‘community’ as the magic bullet in the same way Reformed people view preaching.”
    Tim Keller

  • #28
    Timothy J. Keller
    “God's Kingdom is "present in its beginnings, but still future in its fullness. This guards us from an under-realized eschatology (expecting no change now) and an over-realized eschatology (expecting all change now). In this stage, we embrace the reality that while we're not yet what we will be, we're also no longer what we used to be.”
    Tim Keller

  • #29
    Timothy J. Keller
    “Jesus's teaching consistently attracted the irreligious while offending the Bible-believing, religious people of his day. However, in the main, our churches today do not have this effect. The kind of outsiders Jesus attracted are not attracted to contemporary churches, even our most avant-garde ones. We tend to draw conservative, buttoned-down, moralistic people. The licentious and liberated or the broken and marginal avoid church. That can only mean one thing. If the preaching of our ministers and the practice of our parishioners do not have the same effect on people that Jesus had, then we must not be declaring the same message that Jesus did.”
    Timothy Keller, The Prodigal God: Recovering the Heart of the Christian Faith

  • #30
    Timothy J. Keller
    “Neither son loved the father for himself. They both were using the father for their own self-centered ends rather than loving, enjoying, and serving him for his own sake. This means that you can rebel against God and be alienated from him either by breaking his rules or by keeping all of them diligently. It's a shocking message: Careful obedience to God's law may serve as a strategy for rebelling against God.”
    Timothy Keller, The Prodigal God: Recovering the Heart of the Christian Faith



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