Debarshi > Debarshi's Quotes

Showing 1-30 of 293
« previous 1 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10
sort by

  • #1
    George Orwell
    “The best books... are those that tell you what you know already.”
    George Orwell, 1984

  • #2
    Rudyard Kipling
    “If you can keep your head when all about you
    Are losing theirs and blaming it on you,
    If you can trust yourself when all men doubt you,
    But make allowance for their doubting too;

    If you can wait and not be tired by waiting,
    Or being lied about, don't deal in lies,
    Or being hated, don't give way to hating,
    And yet don't look too good, nor talk too wise

    If you can dream - and not make dreams your master;
    If you can think - and not make thoughts your aim;
    If you can meet with Triumph and Disaster
    And treat those two impostors just the same;

    If you can bear to hear the truth you've spoken
    Twisted by knaves to make a trap for fools,
    Or watch the things you gave your life to, broken,
    And stoop and build 'em up with worn-out tools

    If you can make one heap of all your winnings
    And risk it on one turn of pitch-and-toss,
    And lose, and start again at your beginnings
    And never breathe a word about your loss;

    If you can force your heart and nerve and sinew
    To serve your turn long after they are gone,
    And so hold on when there is nothing in you
    Except the will which says to them: 'Hold on!'

    If you can talk with crowds and keep your virtue,
    Or walk with Kings - nor lose the common touch,
    If neither foes nor loving friends can hurt you,
    If all men count with you, but none too much;

    If you can fill the unforgiving minute
    With sixty seconds' worth of distance run,
    Yours is the Earth and everything that's in it,
    And - which is more - you'll be a Man, my son!”
    Rudyard Kipling, If: A Father's Advice to His Son

  • #4
    Terry Pratchett
    “All right," said Susan. "I'm not stupid. You're saying humans need... fantasies to make life bearable."

    REALLY? AS IF IT WAS SOME KIND OF PINK PILL? NO. HUMANS NEED FANTASY TO BE HUMAN. TO BE THE PLACE WHERE THE FALLING ANGEL MEETS THE RISING APE.

    "Tooth fairies? Hogfathers? Little—"

    YES. AS PRACTICE. YOU HAVE TO START OUT LEARNING TO BELIEVE THE LITTLE LIES.

    "So we can believe the big ones?"

    YES. JUSTICE. MERCY. DUTY. THAT SORT OF THING.

    "They're not the same at all!"

    YOU THINK SO? THEN TAKE THE UNIVERSE AND GRIND IT DOWN TO THE FINEST POWDER AND SIEVE IT THROUGH THE FINEST SIEVE AND THEN SHOW ME ONE ATOM OF JUSTICE, ONE MOLECULE OF MERCY. AND YET—Death waved a hand. AND YET YOU ACT AS IF THERE IS SOME IDEAL ORDER IN THE WORLD, AS IF THERE IS SOME...SOME RIGHTNESS IN THE UNIVERSE BY WHICH IT MAY BE JUDGED.

    "Yes, but people have got to believe that, or what's the point—"

    MY POINT EXACTLY.”
    Terry Pratchett, Hogfather

  • #5
    Alan Moore
    Roschach's Journal: October 12th, 1985

    Dog carcass in alley this morning, tire tread on burst stomach. This city is afraid of me. I have seen its true face.

    The streets are extended gutters and the gutters are full of blood and when the drains finally scab over, all the vermin will drown.

    The accumulated filth of all their sex and murder will foam up about their waists and all the whores and politicians will look up and shout "Save us!"... and I'll look down and whisper "No.”
    Alan Moore, Watchmen

  • #6
    Isaac Asimov
    “Any book worth banning is a book worth reading.”
    Isaac Asimov

  • #7
    P.G. Wodehouse
    “Everything in life that’s any fun, as somebody wisely observed, is either immoral, illegal or fattening.”
    P.G. Wodehouse

  • #7
    P.G. Wodehouse
    “I'm not absolutely certain of the facts, but I rather fancy it's Shakespeare who says that it's always just when a fellow is feeling particularly braced with things in general that Fate sneaks up behind him with the bit of lead piping.”
    P. G. Wodehouse, Jeeves and the Unbidden Guest

  • #8
    Wataru Watari
    “The grapes that my hands wouldn’t reach were undoubtedly sour.
    But I didn’t need sweet fruits that were like a lie. I didn’t need things like a fake understanding and a deceptive relationship.
    What I wanted was that sour grape.
    Even if it’s sour, even if it’s bitter, even if it’s disgusting, even if it’s full of poison, even if it didn’t exist, even if I couldn’t lay my hands on it, even if I wasn’t allowed to wish for it.”
    Wataru Watari

  • #9
    Alan Moore
    “Stood in firelight, sweltering. Bloodstain on chest like map of violent new continent. Felt cleansed. Felt dark planet turn under my feet and knew what cats know that makes them scream like babies in night.

    Looked at sky through smoke heavy with human fat and God was not there. The cold, suffocating dark goes on forever and we are alone. Live our lives, lacking anything better to do. Devise reason later. Born from oblivion; bear children, hell-bound as ourselves, go into oblivion. There is nothing else.

    Existence is random. Has no pattern save what we imagine after staring at it for too long. No meaning save what we choose to impose. This rudderless world is not shaped by vague metaphysical forces. It is not God who kills the children. Not fate that butchers them or destiny that feeds them to the dogs. It’s us. Only us. Streets stank of fire. The void breathed hard on my heart, turning its illusions to ice, shattering them. Was reborn then, free to scrawl own design on this morally blank world.

    Was Rorschach.

    Does that answer your Questions, Doctor?”
    Alan Moore, Watchmen

  • #10
    Alex Scarrow
    “The best way to filter out the bad seeds was to place a job ad for Prime Minister in a national newspaper and all those that applied would be automatically disqualified.”
    Alex Scarrow, Afterlight

  • #11
    H.G. Wells
    “No passion in the world is equal to the passion to alter someone else's draft.”
    H. G. Wells

  • #12
    H.G. Wells
    “The forceps of our minds are clumsy forceps, and crush the truth a little in taking hold of it.”
    H.G. Wells

  • #13
    H.G. Wells
    “What on earth would a man do with himself, if something did not stand in his way?”
    H.G. Wells

  • #16
    Isaac Asimov
    “People think of education as something they can finish.”
    Isaac Asimov

  • #17
    Alistair MacLean
    “The Peacemaker Colt has now been in production, without change in design, for a century. Buy one to-day and it would be indistinguishable from the one Wyatt Earp wore when he was the Marshal of Dodge City. It is the oldest hand-gun in the world, without question the most famous and, if efficiency in its designated task of maiming and killing be taken as criterion of its worth, then it is also probably the best hand-gun ever made. It is no light thing, it is true, to be wounded by some of the Peacemaker’s more highly esteemed competitors, such as the Luger or Mauser: but the high-velocity, narrow-calibre, steel-cased shell from either of those just goes straight through you, leaving a small neat hole in its wake and spending the bulk of its energy on the distant landscape whereas the large and unjacketed soft-nosed lead bullet from the Colt mushrooms on impact, tearing and smashing bone and muscle and tissue as it goes and expending all its energy on you.
    In short when a Peacemaker’s bullet hits you in, say, the leg, you don’t curse, step into shelter, roll and light a cigarette one-handed then smartly shoot your assailant between the eyes. When a Peacemaker bullet hits your leg you fall to the ground unconscious, and if it hits the thigh-bone and you are lucky enough to survive the torn arteries and shock, then you will never walk again without crutches because a totally disintegrated femur leaves the surgeon with no option but to cut your leg off. And so I stood absolutely motionless, not breathing, for the Peacemaker Colt that had prompted this unpleasant train of thought was pointed directly at my right thigh.
    Another thing about the Peacemaker: because of the very heavy and varying trigger pressure required to operate the semi-automatic mechanism, it can be wildly inaccurate unless held in a strong and steady hand. There was no such hope here. The hand that held the Colt, the hand that lay so lightly yet purposefully on the radio-operator’s table, was the steadiest hand I’ve ever seen. It was literally motionless. I could see the hand very clearly. The light in the radio cabin was very dim, the rheostat of the angled table lamp had been turned down until only a faint pool of yellow fell on the scratched metal of the table, cutting the arm off at the cuff, but the hand was very clear. Rock-steady, the gun could have lain no quieter in the marbled hand of a statue. Beyond the pool of light I could half sense, half see the dark outline of a figure leaning back against the bulkhead, head slightly tilted to one side, the white gleam of unwinking eyes under the peak of a hat. My eyes went back to the hand. The angle of the Colt hadn’t varied by a fraction of a degree. Unconsciously, almost, I braced my right leg to meet the impending shock. Defensively, this was a very good move, about as useful as holding up a sheet of newspaper in front of me. I wished to God that Colonel Sam Colt had gone in for inventing something else, something useful, like safety-pins.”
    Alistair MacLean, When Eight Bells Toll

  • #17
    Inio Asano
    “If pretending to know was childish and pretending not to know was adult, then Punpun thought that he was still probably just a child.”
    Inio Asano, Buonanotte, Punpun Vol. 5

  • #19
    Inio Asano
    “Freedom without any purpose feels a whole lot like boredom.”
    ASANO INIO

  • #19
    Isaac Asimov
    “Once, when a religionist denounced me in unmeasured terms, I sent him a card saying, "I am sure you believe that I will go to hell when I die, and that once there I will suffer all the pains and tortures the sadistic ingenuity of your deity can devise and that this torture will continue forever. Isn't that enough for you? Do you have to call me bad names in addition?”
    Isaac Asimov, I. Asimov

  • #20
    Anthony Horowitz
    “The worst time to feel alone is when you're in a crowd.”
    Anthony Horowitz, Point Blank

  • #21
    Isaac Asimov
    “We now know the basic rules governing the universe, together with the gravitational interrelationships of its gross components, as shown in the theory of relativity worked out between 1905 and 1916. We also know the basic rules governing the subatomic particles and their interrelationships, since these are very neatly described by the quantum theory worked out between 1900 and 1930. What's more, we have found that the galaxies and clusters of galaxies are the basic units of the physical universe, as discovered between 1920 and 1930.

    ...The young specialist in English Lit, having quoted me, went on to lecture me severely on the fact that in every century people have thought they understood the universe at last, and in every century they were proved to be wrong. It follows that the one thing we can say about our modern 'knowledge' is that it is wrong...

    My answer to him was, when people thought the Earth was flat, they were wrong. When people thought the Earth was spherical they were wrong. But if you think that thinking the Earth is spherical is just as wrong as thinking the Earth is flat, then your view is wronger than both of them put together.

    The basic trouble, you see, is that people think that 'right' and 'wrong' are absolute; that everything that isn't perfectly and completely right is totally and equally wrong.

    However, I don't think that's so. It seems to me that right and wrong are fuzzy concepts, and I will devote this essay to an explanation of why I think so.

    When my friend the English literature expert tells me that in every century scientists think they have worked out the universe and are always wrong, what I want to know is how wrong are they? Are they always wrong to the same degree?”
    Isaac Asimov

  • #22
    Isaac Asimov
    “It is the obvious which is so difficult to see most of the time. People say 'It's as plain as the nose on your face.' But how much of the nose on your face can you see, unless someone holds a mirror up to you?”
    Isaac Asimov, I, Robot

  • #23
    Isaac Asimov
    “Tell me why the stars do shine,
    Tell me why the ivy twines,
    Tell me what makes skies so blue,
    And I'll tell you why I love you.

    Nuclear fusion makes stars to shine,
    Tropisms make the ivy twine,
    Raleigh scattering make skies so blue,
    Testicular hormones are why I love you. ”
    Isaac Asimov

  • #24
    Isaac Asimov
    “Those people who think they know everything are a great annoyance to those of us who do.”
    Isaac Asimov

  • #25
    Isaac Asimov
    “Your assumptions are your windows on the world. Scrub them off every once in a while, or the light won't come in.”
    Isaac Asimov

  • #25
    Chris Bradford
    “Boats are safe in a dock, but boats aren't meant for that.”
    Chris Bradford, The Ring of Wind

  • #26
    Alan Moore
    “Behind this mask there is more than just flesh. Beneath this mask there is an idea... and ideas are bulletproof.”
    Alan Moore, V for Vendetta

  • #28
    Mark Twain
    “Well, there are times when one would like to hang the whole human race and finish the farce.”
    Mark Twain

  • #29
    George R.R. Martin
    “Rhaegar fought valiantly, Rhaegar fought nobly, Rhaegar fought honorably. And Rhaegar died.”
    George R.R. Martin, A Storm of Swords

  • #29
    Katherine Applegate
    “Yes," he said. "You were strong. You were brave. You were good. You mattered.”
    Katherine Alice Applegate, The Beginning

  • #30
    Sui Ishida
    “Sinners judging sinners for sinning differently.”
    Sui Ishida



Rss
« previous 1 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10