Rats McKinley > Rats 's Quotes

Showing 1-30 of 179
« previous 1 3 4 5 6
sort by

  • #1
    Winston S. Churchill
    “Success is not final, failure is not fatal: it is the courage to continue that counts.”
    Winston S. Churchill

  • #2
    Winston S. Churchill
    “You have enemies? Good. That means you've stood up for something, sometime in your life.”
    Winston Churchill

  • #3
    Winston S. Churchill
    “If you are going through hell, keep going.”
    Winston S. Churchill

  • #4
    Winston S. Churchill
    “Tact is the ability to tell someone to go to hell in such a way that they look forward to the trip.”
    Winston Churchill

  • #5
    Winston S. Churchill
    “Success is stumbling from failure to failure with no loss of enthusiasm.”
    Winston S. Churchill

  • #6
    Winston S. Churchill
    “Never, never, never give in!”
    Winston S. Churchill

  • #7
    Winston S. Churchill
    “I am fond of pigs. Dogs look up to us. Cats look down on us. Pigs treat us as equals.”
    Winston S. Churchill

  • #8
    Winston S. Churchill
    “A lady came up to me one day and said 'Sir! You are drunk', to which I replied 'I am drunk today madam, and tomorrow I shall be sober but you will still be ugly.”
    Winston Churchill

  • #9
    Winston S. Churchill
    “The best argument against democracy is a five-minute conversation with the average voter.”
    Winston S. Churchill

  • #10
    Winston S. Churchill
    “Never give in. Never give in. Never, never, never, never—in nothing, great or small, large or petty—never give in, except to convictions of honour and good sense. Never yield to force. Never yield to the apparently overwhelming might of the enemy.”
    Winston Churchill, Never Give In!: The Best of Winston Churchill's Speeches

  • #11
    Winston S. Churchill
    “Continuous effort - not strength or intelligence - is the key to unlocking our potential.”
    Winston S. Churchill

  • #12
    Patton Oswalt
    “That shit [religion] was going on all over the planet. They would tell them about sky cookies, or sky pie, or sky baklava. And as each of these civilizations grew, they built ships; they'd go visit each other, and the one guy would walk off the boat and go,'Hey, did you hear the good news about the sky baklava?' and the first guy went,'It's CAKE, motherfucker! You're dead!”
    Patton Oswalt

  • #13
    Ferdinand de Saussure
    “I’m almost never serious, and I’m always too serious. Too deep, too shallow. Too sensitive, too cold hearted. I’m like a collection of paradoxes.”
    Ferdinand de Saussure

  • #14
    C.G. Jung
    “The creation of something new is not accomplished by the intellect but by the play instinct acting from inner necessity. The creative mind plays with the objects it loves. ”
    Carl Gustav Jung

  • #15
    C.G. Jung
    “The pendulum of the mind oscillates between sense and nonsense, not between right and wrong.”
    Carl Gustav Jung

  • #16
    C.G. Jung
    “Loneliness does not come from having no people about one, but from being unable to communicate the things that seem important to oneself, or from holding certain views which others find inadmissible.”
    Carl Gustav Jung

  • #17
    C.G. Jung
    “You are what you do, not what you say you'll do.”
    Carl Gustav Jung

  • #18
    C.G. Jung
    “I am not what happened to me, I am what I choose to become.”
    Carl Gustav Jung

  • #19
    Henry Miller
    “I have no money, no resources, no hopes. I am the happiest man alive.”
    Henry Miller

  • #20
    Henry Miller
    “Develop an interest in life as you see it; the people, things, literature, music - the world is so rich, simply throbbing with rich treasures, beautiful souls and interesting people. Forget yourself.”
    Henry Miller

  • #21
    Henry Miller
    “I need to be alone. I need to ponder my shame and my despair in seclusion; I need the sunshine and the paving stones of the streets without companions, without conversation, face to face with myself, with only the music of my heart for company.”
    Henry Miller, Tropic of Cancer

  • #22
    Henry Miller
    “If at eighty you're not a cripple or an invalid, if you have your health, if you still enjoy a good walk, a good meal (with all the trimmings), if you can sleep without first taking a pill, if birds and flowers, mountains and sea still inspire you, you are a most fortunate individual and you should get down on your knees morning and night and thank the good Lord for his savin' and keepin' power. If you are young in years but already weary in spirit, already on your way to becoming an automaton, it may do you good to say to your boss - under your breath, of course - "Fuck you, Jack! you don't own me." If you can whistle up your ass, if you can be turned on by a fetching bottom or a lovely pair of teats, if you can fall in love again and again, if you can forgive your parents for the crime of bringing you into the world, if you are content to get nowhere, just take each day as it comes, if you can forgive as well as forget, if you can keep from going sour, surly, bitter and cynical, man you've got it half licked.”
    Henry Miller, Sextet: Six Essays

  • #23
    Thomas Ligotti
    “To my mind, a well-developed sense of humor is the surest indication of a person's humanity, no matter how black and bitter that humor may be.”
    Thomas Ligotti

  • #24
    Thomas Ligotti
    “This is the great lesson the depressive learns: Nothing in the world is inherently compelling. Whatever may be really “out there” cannot project itself as an affective experience. It is all a vacuous affair with only a chemical prestige. Nothing is either good or bad, desirable or undesirable, or anything else except that it is made so by laboratories inside us producing the emotions on which we live. And to live on our emotions is to live arbitrarily, inaccurately—imparting meaning to what has none of its own. Yet what other way is there to live? Without the ever-clanking machinery of emotion, everything would come to a standstill. There would be nothing to do, nowhere to go, nothing to be, and no one to know. The alternatives are clear: to live falsely as pawns of affect, or to live factually as depressives, or as individuals who know what is known to the depressive. How advantageous that we are not coerced into choosing one or the other, neither choice being excellent. One look at human existence is proof enough that our species will not be released from the stranglehold of emotionalism that anchors it to hallucinations. That may be no way to live, but to opt for depression would be to opt out of existence as we consciously know it.”
    Thomas Ligotti, The Conspiracy Against the Human Race

  • #25
    Thomas Ligotti
    “For the rest of the earth’s organisms, existence is relatively uncomplicated. Their lives are about three things: survival, reproduction, death—and nothing else. But we know too much to content ourselves with surviving, reproducing, dying—and nothing else. We know we are alive and know we will die. We also know we will suffer during our lives before suffering—slowly or quickly—as we draw near to death. This is the knowledge we “enjoy” as the most intelligent organisms to gush from the womb of nature. And being so, we feel shortchanged if there is nothing else for us than to survive, reproduce, and die. We want there to be more to it than that, or to think there is. This is the tragedy: Consciousness has forced us into the paradoxical position of striving to be unself-conscious of what we are—hunks of spoiling flesh on disintegrating bones.”
    Thomas Ligotti, The Conspiracy Against the Human Race

  • #26
    Thomas Ligotti
    “As history confirms, people will change their minds about almost anything, from which god they worship to how they style their hair. But when it comes to existential judgments, human beings in general have an unfalteringly good opinion of themselves and their condition in this world and are steadfastly confident they are not a collection of self-conscious nothings.”
    Thomas Ligotti, The Conspiracy Against the Human Race

  • #27
    Thomas Ligotti
    “Within the hierarchy of fabrications that compose our lives—families, countries, gods—the self incontestably ranks highest. Just below the self is the family, which has proven itself more durable than national or ethnic affiliations, with these in turn outranking god-figures for their staying power. So any progress toward the salvation of humankind will probably begin from the bottom—when our gods have been devalued to the status of refrigerator magnets or lawn ornaments. Following the death rattle of deities, it would appear that nations or ethnic communities are next in line for the boneyard. Only after fealty to countries, gods, and families has been shucked off can we even think about coming to grips with the least endangered of fabrications—the self.”
    Thomas Ligotti, The Conspiracy Against the Human Race

  • #28
    Thomas Ligotti
    “One cringes to hear scientists cooing over the universe or any part thereof like schoolgirls over-heated by their first crush. From the studies of Krafft-Ebbing onward, we know that it is possible to become excited about anything—from shins to shoehorns. But it would be nice if just one of these gushing eggheads would step back and, as a concession to objectivity, speak the truth: THERE IS NOTHING INNATELY IMPRESSIVE ABOUT THE UNIVERSE OR ANYTHING IN IT.”
    Thomas Ligotti, The Conspiracy Against the Human Race

  • #29
    Thomas Ligotti
    “As for procreation, no one in his right mind would say that it is the only activity devoid of a praiseworthy incentive. Those who reproduce, then, should not feel unfairly culled as the worst conspirators against the human race. Every one of us is culpable in keeping the conspiracy alive, which is all right with most people.”
    Thomas Ligotti, The Conspiracy Against the Human Race

  • #30
    Thomas Ligotti
    “As a fact, we cannot give suffering precedence in either our individual or collective lives. We have to get on with things, and those who give precedence to suffering will be left behind. They fetter us with their sniveling. We have someplace to go and must believe we can get there, wherever that may be. And to conceive that there is a 'brotherhood of suffering between everything alive' would disable us from getting anywhere. We are preoccupied with the good life, and step by step are working toward a better life. What we do, as a conscious species, is set markers for ourselves. Once we reach one marker, we advance to the next — as if we were playing a board game we think will never end, despite the fact that it will, like it or not. And if you are too conscious of not liking it, then you may conceive of yourself as a biological paradox that cannot live with its consciousness and cannot live without it. And in so living and not living, you take your place with the undead and the human puppet.”
    Thomas Ligotti, The Conspiracy Against the Human Race



Rss
« previous 1 3 4 5 6