Ebon Schultz > Ebon's Quotes

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  • #1
    Ayn Rand
    “A creative man is motivated by the desire to achieve, not by the desire to beat others.”
    Ayn Rand

  • #2
    Ayn Rand
    “[Dean] “My dear fellow, who will let you?”

    [Roark] “That’s not the point. The point is, who will stop me?”
    Ayn Rand, The Fountainhead

  • #3
    Chuck Palahniuk
    “It's only after we've lost everything that we're free to do anything.”
    Chuck Palahniuk, Fight Club

  • #4
    Chuck Palahniuk
    “The one you love and the one who loves you are never, ever the same person.”
    Chuck Palahniuk, Invisible Monsters

  • #5
    Chuck Palahniuk
    “All God does is watch us and kill us when we get boring. We must never, ever be boring.”
    Chuck Palahniuk, Invisible Monsters

  • #6
    Aldous Huxley
    “Facts do not cease to exist because they are ignored.”
    Aldous Huxley, Complete Essays 2, 1926-29

  • #7
    Aldous Huxley
    “Maybe this world is another planet’s hell.”
    Aldous Huxley

  • #8
    Albert Camus
    “Don’t walk in front of me… I may not follow
    Don’t walk behind me… I may not lead
    Walk beside me… just be my friend”
    Albert Camus

  • #9
    Albert Camus
    “You will never be happy if you continue to search for what happiness consists of. You will never live if you are looking for the meaning of life.”
    Albert Camus

  • #10
    Albert Camus
    “Man is the only creature who refuses to be what he is.”
    Albert Camus

  • #11
    Neil Gaiman
    “Fairy tales are more than true: not because they tell us that dragons exist, but because they tell us that dragons can be beaten.”
    Neil Gaiman, Coraline

  • #12
    Billy Sunday
    “Going to church doesn’t make you a Christian any more than going to a garage makes you an automobile.”
    Billy Sunday, Billy Sunday, the Man and His Message: With His Own Words Which Have Won Thousands for Christ

  • #13
    William Peter Blatty
    “Perhaps evil is the crucible of goodness... and perhaps even Satan - Satan, in spite of himself - somehow serves to work out the will of God.”
    William Peter Blatty, The Exorcist
    tags: faith

  • #14
    Arthur Conan Doyle
    “When you have eliminated all which is impossible, then whatever remains, however improbable, must be the truth.”
    Arthur Conan Doyle, The Case-Book of Sherlock Holmes

  • #15
    Arthur Conan Doyle
    “It has long been an axiom of mine that the little things are infinitely the most important.”
    Sir Arthur Conan Doyle, The Memoirs of Sherlock Holmes

  • #16
    Arthur Conan Doyle
    “It is a great thing to start life with a small number of really good books which are your very own.”
    Arthur Conan Doyle

  • #17
    Philip K. Dick
    “It is sometimes an appropriate response to reality to go insane.”
    Philip K. Dick, VALIS

  • #18
    Alan Moore
    “My experience of life is that it is not divided up into genres; it’s a horrifying, romantic, tragic, comical, science-fiction cowboy detective novel. You know, with a bit of pornography if you're lucky.”
    Alan Moore

  • #19
    Alan Moore
    “People shouldn't be afraid of their government. Governments should be afraid of their people.”
    Alan Moore, V for Vendetta

  • #20
    Alan Moore
    “Stood in firelight, sweltering. Bloodstain on chest like map of violent new continent. Felt cleansed. Felt dark planet turn under my feet and knew what cats know that makes them scream like babies in night.

    Looked at sky through smoke heavy with human fat and God was not there. The cold, suffocating dark goes on forever and we are alone. Live our lives, lacking anything better to do. Devise reason later. Born from oblivion; bear children, hell-bound as ourselves, go into oblivion. There is nothing else.

    Existence is random. Has no pattern save what we imagine after staring at it for too long. No meaning save what we choose to impose. This rudderless world is not shaped by vague metaphysical forces. It is not God who kills the children. Not fate that butchers them or destiny that feeds them to the dogs. It’s us. Only us. Streets stank of fire. The void breathed hard on my heart, turning its illusions to ice, shattering them. Was reborn then, free to scrawl own design on this morally blank world.

    Was Rorschach.

    Does that answer your Questions, Doctor?”
    Alan Moore, Watchmen

  • #21
    George Orwell
    “In a time of deceit telling the truth is a revolutionary act.”
    George Orwell

  • #22
    George MacDonald Fraser
    “There's a point, you know, where treachery is so complete and unashamed that it becomes statesmanship.”
    George MacDonald Fraser, Flashman and the Mountain of Light

  • #23
    George MacDonald Fraser
    “The advantage to being a wicked bastard is that everyone pesters the Lord on your behalf; if volume of prayers from my saintly enemies means anything, I'll be saved when the Archbishop of Canterbury is damned. It's a comforting thought.”
    George MacDonald Fraser, Flashman at the Charge

  • #24
    Neal Stephenson
    “The difference between stupid and intelligent people – and this is true whether or not they are well-educated – is that intelligent people can handle subtlety. ”
    Neal Stephenson, The Diamond Age: Or, A Young Lady's Illustrated Primer

  • #25
    Neal Stephenson
    “Arguing with anonymous strangers on the Internet is a sucker's game because they almost always turn out to be—or to be indistinguishable from—self-righteous sixteen-year-olds possessing infinite amounts of free time.”
    Neal Stephenson, Cryptonomicon

  • #26
    Neal Stephenson
    “Until a man is twenty-five, he still thinks, every so often, that under the right circumstances he could be the baddest motherfucker in the world. If I moved to a martial-arts monastery in China and studied real hard for ten years. If my family was wiped out by Colombian drug dealers and I swore myself to revenge. If I got a fatal disease, had one year to live, and devoted it to wiping out street crime. If I just dropped out and devoted my life to being bad.”
    Neal Stephenson

  • #27
    Marshall McLuhan
    “I don't necessarily agree with everything that I say.”
    Marshall McLuhan

  • #28
    Marshall McLuhan
    “Every society honors its live conformists and its dead troublemakers.”
    Marshall McLuhan

  • #29
    Marshall McLuhan
    “Our Age of Anxiety is, in great part, the result of trying to do today’s jobs with yesterday’s tools!”
    Marshall McLuhan

  • #30
    Neil Postman
    “We were keeping our eye on 1984. When the year came and the prophecy didn't, thoughtful Americans sang softly in praise of themselves. The roots of liberal democracy had held. Wherever else the terror had happened, we, at least, had not been visited by Orwellian nightmares.

    But we had forgotten that alongside Orwell's dark vision, there was another - slightly older, slightly less well known, equally chilling: Aldous Huxley's Brave New World. Contrary to common belief even among the educated, Huxley and Orwell did not prophesy the same thing. Orwell warns that we will be overcome by an externally imposed oppression. But in Huxley's vision, no Big Brother is required to deprive people of their autonomy, maturity and history. As he saw it, people will come to love their oppression, to adore the technologies that undo their capacities to think.

    What Orwell feared were those who would ban books. What Huxley feared was that there would be no reason to ban a book, for there would be no one who wanted to read one. Orwell feared those who would deprive us of information. Huxley feared those who would give us so much that we would be reduced to passivity and egoism. Orwell feared that the truth would be concealed from us. Huxley feared the truth would be drowned in a sea of irrelevance. Orwell feared we would become a captive culture. Huxley feared we would become a trivial culture, preoccupied with some equivalent of the feelies, the orgy porgy, and the centrifugal bumblepuppy. As Huxley remarked in Brave New World Revisited, the civil libertarians and rationalists who are ever on the alert to oppose tyranny "failed to take into account man's almost infinite appetite for distractions." In 1984, Orwell added, people are controlled by inflicting pain. In Brave New World, they are controlled by inflicting pleasure. In short, Orwell feared that what we fear will ruin us. Huxley feared that what we desire will ruin us.

    This book is about the possibility that Huxley, not Orwell, was right.”
    Neil Postman, Amusing Ourselves to Death: Public Discourse in the Age of Show Business



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