Matt Mcmanus > Matt's Quotes

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  • #1
    Ignatius of Loyola
    “For it is not knowing much, but realising and relishing things interiorly, that contents and satisfies the soul.”
    Ignatius of Loyola, The Spiritual Exercises

  • #2
    Thomas Merton
    “It is true that the materialistic society, the so-called culture that has evolved under the tender mercies of capitalism, has produced what seems to be the ultimate limit of this worldliness. And nowhere, except perhaps in the analogous society of pagan Rome, has there ever been such a flowering of cheap and petty and disgusting lusts and vanities as in the world of capitalism, where there is no evil that is not fostered and encouraged for the sake of making money. We live in a society whose whole policy is to excite every nerve in the human body and keep it at the highest pitch of artificial tension, to strain every human desire to the limit and to create as many new desires and synthetic passions as possible, in order to cater to them with the products of our factories and printing presses and movie studios and all the rest.”
    Thomas Merton, The Seven Storey Mountain

  • #3
    Thomas Merton
    “The life of the soul is not knowledge, it is love, since love is the act of the supreme faculty, the will, by which man is formally united to the final end of all his strivings—by which man becomes one with God.”
    Thomas Merton, The Seven Storey Mountain

  • #4
    Richard  Beck
    “This is how worship is connected to our ability to love. When we give our ultimate allegiance to any of the principalities and powers, large or small, we find ourselves perennially at war with anyone who places these things at risk. Idolatry breeds perpetual vigilance and violence.”
    Richard Beck, Reviving Old Scratch: Demons and the Devil for Doubters and the Disenchanted

  • #5
    Carl Sagan
    “I have a foreboding of an America in my children’s or grandchildren’s time—when the United States is a service and information economy; when nearly all the key manufacturing industries have slipped away to other countries; when awesome technological powers are in the hands of a very few, and no one representing the public interest can even grasp the issues; when the people have lost the ability to set their own agendas or knowledgeably question those in authority; when, clutching our crystals and nervously consulting our horoscopes, our critical faculties in decline, unable to distinguish between what feels good and what’s true, we slide, almost without noticing, back into superstition and darkness.”
    Carl Sagan, The Demon-Haunted World: Science as a Candle in the Dark

  • #6
    “We must rapidly begin the shift from a thing-oriented society to a person-oriented society. When machines and computers, profit motives and property rights, are considered more important than people, the giant triplets of racism, extreme materialism, and militarism are incapable of being conquered.”
    Clayborne Carson, The Autobiography of Martin Luther King, Jr.

  • #7
    Bryan Stevenson
    “These aren’t my scars, cuts, and bruises. These are my medals of honor.”
    Bryan Stevenson, Just Mercy: A Story of Justice and Redemption

  • #8
    Richard Rohr
    “We’ve turned faith into a right to certitude when, in fact, this Trinitarian mystery is whispering quite the opposite: we have to live in exquisite, terrible humility before reality.”
    Richard Rohr, The Divine Dance: The Trinity and Your Transformation

  • #9
    Richard Rohr
    “Knowing without loving is frankly dangerous for the soul and for society. You’ll critique most everything you encounter and even have the hubris to call this mode of reflexive cynicism “thinking”
    Richard Rohr, The Divine Dance: The Trinity and Your Transformation

  • #10
    Richard Rohr
    “You rest in God, not in outcomes.”
    Richard Rohr, The Divine Dance: The Trinity and Your Transformation

  • #11
    Richard Rohr
    “God does not decide to love, therefore, and God’s love can never be determined by the worthiness or unworthiness of the object. But God is Love itself.4 God cannot not love, because love is the nature of God’s very being.”
    Richard Rohr, The Divine Dance: The Trinity and Your Transformation

  • #12
    Thomas Merton
    “On the contrary, the deep, inexpressible certitude of the contemplative experience awakens a tragic anguish and opens many questions in the depths of the heart like wounds that cannot stop bleeding. For every gain in deep certitude there is a corresponding growth of superficial “doubt.” This doubt is by no means opposed to genuine faith, but it mercilessly examines and questions the spurious “faith” of everyday life, the human faith which is nothing but the passive acceptance of conventional opinion. This false “faith” which is what we often live by and which we even come to confuse with our “religion” is subjected to inexorable questioning. This torment is a kind of trial by fire in which we are compelled, by the very light of invisible truth which has reached us in the dark ray of contemplation, to examine, to doubt and finally to reject all the prejudices and conventions that we have hitherto accepted as if they were dogmas.”
    Thomas Merton, New Seeds of Contemplation

  • #13
    Thomas Merton
    “It is true that God knows Himself in all the things that exist. He sees them, and it is because He sees them that they exist. It is because He loves them that they are good. His love in them is their intrinsic goodness. The value He sees in them is their value. In so far as He sees and loves them, all things reflect Him.”
    Thomas Merton, New Seeds of Contemplation

  • #14
    Thomas Merton
    “True solitude is the home of the person, false solitude the refuge of the individualist.”
    Thomas Merton, New Seeds of Contemplation

  • #15
    Thomas Merton
    “Strong hate, the hate that takes joy in hating, is strong because it does not believe itself to be unworthy and alone. It feels the support of a justifying God, of an idol of war, an avenging and destroying spirit. From such blood-drinking gods the human race was once liberated, with great toil and terrible sorrow, by the death of a God Who delivered Himself to the Cross and suffered the pathological cruelty of His own creatures out of pity for them. In conquering death He opened their eyes to the reality of a love which asks no questions about worthiness, a love which overcomes hatred and destroys death. But men have now come to reject this divine revelation of pardon, and they are consequently returning to the old war gods, the gods that insatiably drink blood and eat the flesh of men. It is easier to serve the hate-gods because they thrive on the worship of collective fanaticism. To serve the hate-gods, one has only to be blinded by collective passion. To serve the God of Love one must be free, one must face the terrible responsibility of the decision to love in spite of all unworthiness whether in oneself or in one’s neighbor.”
    Thomas Merton, New Seeds of Contemplation

  • #16
    Thomas Merton
    “But nevertheless, no man who seeks liberation and light in solitude, no man who seeks spiritual freedom, can afford to yield passively to all the appeals of a society of salesmen, advertisers and consumers.”
    Thomas Merton, New Seeds of Contemplation

  • #17
    Thomas Merton
    “A “FAITH” that merely confirms us in opinionatedness and self-complacency may well be an expression of theological doubt. True faith is never merely a source of spiritual comfort. It may indeed bring peace, but before it does so it must involve us in struggle. A “faith” that avoids this struggle is really a temptation against true faith.”
    Thomas Merton, New Seeds of Contemplation

  • #18
    Thomas Merton
    “Do not think that you can show your love for Christ by hating those who seem to be His enemies on earth. Suppose they really do hate Him: nevertheless He loves them, and you cannot be united with Him unless you love them too.”
    Thomas Merton, New Seeds of Contemplation

  • #19
    Thomas Merton
    “A spirit that is drawn to God in contemplation will soon learn the value of obedience: the hardships and anguish he has to suffer every day from the burden of his own selfishness, his clumsiness, incompetence and pride will give him a hunger to be led and advised and directed by somebody else.”
    Thomas Merton, New Seeds of Contemplation

  • #20
    W.E.B. Du Bois
    “Daily the Negro is coming more and more to look upon law and justice, not as protecting safeguards, but as sources of humiliation and oppression. The laws are made by men who have little interest in him; they are executed by men who have absolutely no motive for treating the black people with courtesy or consideration; and, finally, the accused law-breaker is tried, not by his peers, but too often by men who would rather punish ten innocent Negroes than let one guilty one escape.”
    W.E.B. Du Bois, The Souls of Black Folk

  • #21
    Peter Rollins
    “But the moment we experience the ground beneath our feet dissolving and feel the loss of all certainties is the moment we touch upon the experience of the Cross.”
    Peter Rollins, The Idolatry of God: Breaking Our Addiction to Certainty and Satisfaction

  • #22
    Peter Rollins
    “it can be said that God is not seen but is testified to in a particular way of seeing. Previously we saw how the Idol is experienced as existing, until we grasp it and discover that it doesn’t. Here God is felt not to exist, and yet by this act of calling everything into existence it seems that the moment we stop trying to grasp God the existence of God is indirectly testified to in the existence of everything we encounter.”
    Peter Rollins, The Idolatry of God: Breaking Our Addiction to Certainty and Satisfaction

  • #23
    Peter Rollins
    “For when we genuinely look at how the other sees us, we are confronted with a distance that exists between the image we have of ourselves and the reality of our actions.”
    Peter Rollins, The Idolatry of God: Breaking Our Addiction to Certainty and Satisfaction

  • #24
    Henri J.M. Nouwen
    “We enter into solitude first of all to meet our Lord and to be with Him and Him alone. Only in the context of grace can we face our sin; only in the place of healing do we dare to show our wounds; only with a single-minded attention to Christ can we give up our clinging fears and face our own true nature. Solitude is a place where Christ remodels us in his own image and frees us from the victimizing compulsions of the world.”
    Henri J.M. Nouwen, The Way of the Heart: The Spirituality of the Desert Fathers and Mothers

  • #25
    Henri J.M. Nouwen
    “When we say to people, 'I will pray for you,' we make a very important commitment. The sad thing is that this remark often remains nothing but a well-meant expression of concern. But when we learn to descend with our mind into our heart, then all those who have become part of our lives are led into the healing presence of God and touched by him in the center of our being. We are speaking here about a mystery for which words are inadequate. It is the mystery that the heart, which is the center of our being, is transformed by God into his own heart, a heart large enough to embrace the entire universe. Through prayer we can carry in our heart all human pain and sorrow, all conflicts and agonies, all torture and war, all hunger, loneliness, and misery, not because of some great psychological or emotional capacity, but because God's heart has become one with ours.”
    Henri J.M. Nouwen, The Way of the Heart: The Spirituality of the Desert Fathers and Mothers

  • #26
    Hermann Hesse
    “I have always believed, and I still believe, that whatever good or bad fortune may come our way we can always give it meaning and transform it into something of value.”
    Hermann Hesse, Siddhartha

  • #27
    Mary Doria Russell
    “So much of what he knew about religion struck him as total bullshit; he was disarmed when the fathers freely admitted that some stories were in fact pious fictions. But, judging his character, they dared him to cut through what he called the crap: to find the core of truth, carefully preserved and offered”
    Mary Doria Russell, The Sparrow

  • #28
    Thomas Merton
    “Here the highest knowledge Is unbounded. That which gives things Their thusness cannot be delimited by things. So when we speak of ‘limits,’ we remain confined To limited things. The limit of the unlimited is called ‘fullness.’ The limitlessness of the limited is called ‘emptiness.’ Tao is the source of both. But it is itself Neither fullness nor emptiness. Tao produces both renewal and decay, But is neither renewal or decay. It causes being and non-being But is neither being nor non-being. Tao assembles and it destroys, But it is neither the Totality nor the Void.”
    Thomas Merton, The Way of Chuang Tzu

  • #29
    Thomas Merton
    “The greatest politeness Is free of all formality. Perfect conduct Is free of concern. Perfect wisdom Is unplanned. Perfect love Is without demonstrations. Perfect sincerity offers No guarantee.”
    Thomas Merton, The Way of Chuang Tzu

  • #30
    Martin Laird
    “Symptoms of growth may look like breakdown or derangement; the more we are allowed by the love of others and by self-understanding to live through our derangement into the new arrangement, the luckier we are. It is unfortunate when our anxiety over what looks like personal confusion or dereliction blinds us to the forces of liberation at work.”
    Martin Laird, Into the Silent Land: A Guide to the Christian Practice of Contemplation



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