Aria Marazzie > Aria's Quotes

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  • #1
    Victor Hugo
    “Teach the ignorant as much as you can; society is culpable in not providing a free education for all and it must answer for the night which it produces. If the soul is left in darkness sins will be committed. The guilty one is not he who commits the sin, but he who causes the darkness.”
    Victor Hugo, Les Misérables

  • #2
    Victor Hugo
    “There is always more misery among the lower classes than there is humanity in the higher.”
    Victor Hugo, Les Misérables

  • #3
    Victor Hugo
    “Every blade has two edges; he who wounds with one wounds himself with the other.”
    Victor Hugo

  • #4
    Victor Hugo
    “Be a bird perched on a frail branch that she feels bending beneath her, still she sings away all the same, knowing she has wings.”
    Victor Hugo

  • #5
    Russell Brand
    “It's difficult to believe in yourself because the idea of self is an artificial construction. You are, in fact, part of the glorious oneness of the universe. Everything beautiful in the world is within you. No one really feels self-confident deep down because it's an artificial idea. Really, people aren't that worried about what you're doing or what you're saying, so you can drift around the world relatively anonymously: you must not feel persecuted and examined. Liberate yourself from that idea that people are watching you.”
    Russell Brand

  • #6
    George Monbiot
    “We are often told we are materialistic. It seems to me, we are not materialistic enough. We have a disrespect for materials. We use it quickly and carelessly.

    If were genuinely materialistic people, we would understand where materials come from and where they go to.

    But, at the moment, the entire global economy seems to be built on the model of digging things up from one hole in the ground on one side of the earth, transporting them around the world, using them for a few days, and sticking them in a hole in the ground on the other side of the world.”
    George Monbiot

  • #7
    George Monbiot
    “So if you don’t fit in; if you feel at odds with the world; if your identity is troubled and frayed; if you feel lost and ashamed, it could be because you have retained the human values you were supposed to have discarded. You are a deviant. Be proud.”
    George Monbiot, How Did We Get into This Mess?: Politics, Equality, Nature

  • #8
    George Monbiot
    “Environment' is a term that creates no pictures in the mind, which is why I have begun to use 'natural world' or 'living planet' instead.”
    George Monbiot

  • #9
    George Monbiot
    “To seek enlightenment, intellectual or spiritual; to do good; to love and be loved; to create and to teach: these are the highest purposes of humankind. If there is meaning in life, it lies here.”
    George Monbiot, How Did We Get into This Mess?: Politics, Equality, Nature

  • #10
    George Monbiot
    “Arrange these threats in ascending order of deadliness: wolves, vending machines, cows, domestic dogs and toothpicks. I will save you the trouble: they have been ordered already.

    The number of deaths known to have been caused by wolves in North America in the twenty-first century is one: if averaged out, that would be 0.08 per year. The average number of people killed in the US by vending machines is 2.2 (people sometimes rock them to try to extract their drinks, with predictable results). Cows kill some twenty people in the US, dogs thirty-one. Over the past century, swallowing toothpicks caused the deaths of around 170 Americans a year. Though there are sixty thousand wolves in North America, the risk of being killed by one is almost nonexistent.”
    George Monbiot

  • #11
    Mark Fisher
    “The current ruling ontology denies any possibility of a social causation of mental illness. The chemico-biologization of mental illness is of course strictly commensurate with its depoliticization. Considering mental illness an individual chemico-biological problem has enormous benefits for capitalism. First, it reinforces Capital’s drive towards atomistic individualization (you are sick because of your brain chemistry). Second, it provides an enormously lucrative market in which multinational pharmaceutical companies can peddle their pharmaceuticals (we can cure you with our SSRls). It goes without saying that all mental illnesses are neurologically instantiated, but this says nothing about their causation. If it is true, for instance, that depression is constituted by low serotonin levels, what still needs to be explained is why particular individuals have low levels of serotonin. This requires a social and political explanation; and the task of repoliticizing mental illness is an urgent one if the left wants to challenge capitalist realism.”
    Mark Fisher, Capitalist Realism: Is There No Alternative?

  • #12
    Mark Fisher
    “The ideological blackmail that has been in place since the original Live Aid concerts in 1985 has insisted that ‘caring individuals’ could end famine directly, without the need for any kind of political solution or systemic reorganization. It is necessary to act straight away, we were told; politics has to be suspended in the name of ethical immediacy. Bono’s Product Red brand wanted to dispense even with the philanthropic intermediary. ‘Philanthropy is like hippy music, holding hands’, Bono proclaimed. ‘Red is more like punk rock, hip hop, this should feel like hard commerce’. The point was not to offer an alternative to capitalism - on the contrary, Product Red’s ‘punk rock’ or ‘hip hop’ character consisted in its ‘realistic’ acceptance that capitalism is the only game in town. No, the aim was only to ensure that some of the proceeds of particular transactions went to good causes. The fantasy being that western consumerism, far from being intrinsically implicated in systemic global inequalities, could itself solve them. All we have to do is buy the right products.”
    Mark Fisher, Capitalist Realism: Is There No Alternative?

  • #13
    Mark Fisher
    “Capitalist realism insists on treating mental health as if it were a natural fact, like weather (but, then again, weather is no longer a natural fact so much as a political-economic effect). In the 1960s and 1970s, radical theory and politics (Laing, Foucault, Deleuze and Guattari, etc.) coalesced around extreme mental conditions such as schizophrenia, arguing, for instance, that madness was not a natural, but a political, category. But what is needed now is a politicization of much more common disorders. Indeed, it is their very commonness which is the issue: in Britain, depression is now the condition that is most treated by the NHS. In his book The Selfish Capitalist, Oliver James has convincingly posited a correlation between rising rates of mental distress and the neoliberal mode of capitalism practiced in countries like Britain, the USA and Australia. In line with James’s claims, I want to argue that it is necessary to reframe the growing problem of stress (and distress) in capitalist societies. Instead of treating it as incumbent on individuals to resolve their own psychological distress, instead, that is, of accepting the vast privatization of stress that has taken place over the last thirty years, we need to ask: how has it become acceptable that so many people, and especially so many young people, are ill?”
    Mark Fisher, Capitalist Realism: Is There No Alternative?

  • #14
    Mark Fisher
    “The role of capitalist ideology is not to make an explicit case for something in the way that propaganda does, but to conceal the fact that the operations of capital do not depend on any sort of subjectively assumed belief. It is impossible to conceive of fascism or Stalinism without propaganda - but capitalism can proceed perfectly well, in some ways better, without anyone making a case for it.”
    Mark Fisher, Capitalist Realism: Is There No Alternative?

  • #15
    Mark Fisher
    “Kafka’s purgatorial vision of a bureaucratic labyrinth without end chimes with Žižek’s claim that the Soviet system was an ‘empire of signs’, in which even the Nomenklatura themselves –including Stalin and Molotov – were engaged in interpreting a complex series of social semiotic signals. No-one”
    Mark Fisher, Capitalist Realism: Is there no alternative?

  • #16
    Mark Fisher
    “To reclaim a real political agency means first of all accepting our insertion at the level of desire in the remorseless meat-grinder of Capital. What is being disavowed in the abjection of evil and ignorance onto fantasmatic Others is our own complicity in planetary networks of oppression. What needs to be kept in mind is both that capitalism is a hyper-abstract impersonal structure and that it would be nothing without our co-operation. The most Gothic description of Capital is also the most accurate. Capital is an abstract parasite, an insatiable vampire and zombie-maker; but the living flesh it converts into dead labor is ours, and the zombies it makes are us. There is a sense in which it simply is the case that the political elite are our servants; the miserable service they provide from us is to launder our libidos, to obligingly re-present for us our disavowed desires as if they had nothing to do with us. The”
    Mark Fisher, Capitalist Realism: Is there no alternative?

  • #17
    Mark Fisher
    “If, then, something like attention deficit hyperactivity disorder is a pathology, it is a pathology of late capitalism – a consequence of being wired into the entertainment-control circuits of hyperme-diated consumer culture. Similarly, what is called dyslexia may in many cases amount to a post-lexia. Teenagers process capital’s image-dense data very effectively without any need to read –slogan-recognition is sufficient to navigate the net-mobile-magazine informational plane. ‘Writing has never been capitalism’s thing. Capitalism is profoundly illiterate’, Deleuze”
    Mark Fisher, Capitalist Realism: Is there no alternative?

  • #18
    Oliver James
    “Neurosis is the rule, not the exception’, and grasping this can help us to see that we are not alone. It is also the starting point for understanding what went wrong and learning that we have a choice: we can simply re-enact the past, or we can rewrite the script.”
    Oliver James, They F*** You Up: How To Survive Family Life

  • #19
    Michel Foucault
    “The first task of the doctor is ... political: the struggle against disease must begin with a war against bad government." Man will be totally and definitively cured only if he is first liberated...”
    Michel Foucault, The Birth of the Clinic: An Archaeology of Medical Perception

  • #20
    Michel Foucault
    “In a sense, I am a moralist, insofar as I believe that one of the tasks, one of the meanings of human existence - the source of human freedom - is never to accept anything as definitive, untouchable, obvious, or immobile. No aspect of reality should be allowed to become a definitive and inhuman law for us. We have to rise up against all forms of power - but not just power in the narrow sense of the word, referring to the power of a government or of one social group over another: these are only a few particular instances of power. Power is anything that tends to render immobile and untouchable those things that are offered to us as real, as true, as good.”
    Foucault, Michel

  • #21
    Morrissey
    “It was probably nothing but it felt like the world.”
    Morrissey, Autobiography

  • #22
    Morrissey
    “Oh, I can't help quoting you, because everything that you said rings true.”
    Morrissey

  • #23
    Morrissey
    “The more you ignore me, the closer I get; you're wasting your time.”
    Morrissey

  • #24
    Morrissey
    “When I'm lying in my bed I think about life and I think about death and neither one particularly appeals to me.”
    Morrissey

  • #25
    Morrissey
    “So the life I have made
    May seem wrong to you
    But, I've never been surer
    It's my life to ruin
    My own way...”
    Morrissey

  • #26
    Morrissey
    “Again, I lay awake, and I cried because of waste.”
    Morrissey

  • #27
    Morrissey
    “I was wasting my life, always thinking about myself.”
    Morrissey

  • #28
    Morrissey
    “There are more than enough
    to fight and oppose;
    why waste good time
    fighting the people you like?”
    Morrissey

  • #29
    Morrissey
    “Age shouldn't affect you. It's just like the size of your shoes - they don't determine how you live your life! You're either marvellous or you're boring, regardless of your age.”
    Morrissey

  • #30
    Morrissey
    “I hate most people. And I don’t want to, it’s an awful way to be. But the human race gives me no comfort. I find myself turning to books and films for comfort still. It’s repulsive, because one’s life consists of people, not things.”
    Morrissey



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