Kristina > Kristina 's Quotes

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  • #1
    J.D. Salinger
    “When you're dead, they really fix you up. I hope to hell when I do die somebody has sense enough to just dump me in the river or something. Anything except sticking me in a goddam cemetery. People coming and putting a bunch of flowers on your stomach on Sunday, and all that crap. Who wants flowers when you're dead? Nobody.”
    J.D. Salinger, The Catcher in the Rye

  • #2
    J.D. Salinger
    “I’m just sick of ego, ego, ego. My own and everybody else’s. I’m sick of everybody that wants to get somewhere, do something distinguished and all, be somebody interesting. It’s disgusting.”
    J.D. Salinger, Franny and Zooey

  • #3
    J.D. Salinger
    “Grand. There's a word I really hate. It's a phony. I could puke every time I hear it.”
    J.D. Salinger, The Catcher in the Rye

  • #4
    J.D. Salinger
    “It's funny. All you have to do is say something nobody understands and they'll do practically anything you want them to.”
    J.D. Salinger, The Catcher in the Rye

  • #5
    J.D. Salinger
    “I'm the most terrific liar you ever saw in your life. It's awful. If I'm on my way to the store to buy a magazine, even, and somebody asks me where I'm going, I'm liable to say I'm going to the opera. It's terrible.”
    J.D. Salinger, The Catcher in the Rye

  • #6
    J.D. Salinger
    “This fall I think you're riding for—it's a special kind of fall, a horrible kind. The man falling isn't permitted to feel or hear himself hit bottom. He just keeps falling and falling. The whole arrangement's designed for men who, at some time or other in their lives, were looking for something their own environment couldn't supply them with. Or they thought their own environment couldn't supply them with. So they gave up looking. They gave it up before they ever really even got started.”
    J.D. Salinger, The Catcher in the Rye

  • #7
    Virginia Woolf
    “I feel that by writing I am doing what is far more necessary than anything else.”
    Virginia Woolf

  • #8
    Virginia Woolf
    “It is no use trying to sum people up.”
    Virginia Woolf, Jacob's Room

  • #9
    Virginia Woolf
    “Anyone who has the temerity to write about Jane Austen is aware of [two] facts: first, that of all great writers she is the most difficult to catch in the act of greatness; second, that there are twenty-five elderly gentlemen living in the neighbourhood of London who resent any slight upon her genius as if it were an insult to the chastity of their aunts.”
    Virginia Woolf, A Room of One's Own

  • #10
    Virginia Woolf
    “So he was deserted. The whole world was clamouring: Kill yourself, kill yourself, for our sakes. But why should he kill himself for their sakes? Food was pleasant; the sun hot; and this killing oneself, how does one set about it, with a table knife, uglily, with floods of blood, - by sucking a gaspipe? He was too weak; he could scarcely raise his hand. Besides, now that he was quite alone, condemned, deserted, as those who are about to die are alone, there was a luxury in it, an isolation full of sublimity; a freedom which the attached can never know.”
    Virginia Woolf, Mrs. Dalloway

  • #11
    Virginia Woolf
    “the battered woman--for she wore a skirt--with her right hand exposed, her left clutching at her side, stood singing of love--love which has lasted a million years, she sang, love which prevails, and millions of years ago, her lover, who had been dead these centuries, had walked, she crooned, with her in May; but in the course of ages, long as summer days, and flaming, she remembered, with nothing but red asters, he had gone; death's enormous sickle had swept those tremendous hills, and when at last she laid her hoary and immensely aged head on the earth, now become a mere cinder of ice, she implored the Gods to lay by her side a bunch of purple heather, there on her high burial place which the last rays of the last sun caressed; for then the pageant of the universe would be over.”
    Virginia Woolf

  • #12
    Virginia Woolf
    “Anything may happen when womanhood has ceased to be a protected occupation.”
    Virginia Woolf, A Room of One's Own

  • #13
    Virginia Woolf
    “And all the lives we ever lived and all the lives to be are full of trees
    and changing leaves.”
    Virginia Woolf, To the Lighthouse

  • #14
    Virginia Woolf
    “He called her a melon, a pineapple, an olive tree, an emerald, and a fox in the snow all in the space of three seconds; he did not know whether he had heard her, tasted her, seen her, or all three together.”
    Virginia Woolf

  • #15
    Virginia Woolf
    “It seems that a profound, impartial, and absolutely just opinion of our fellow-creatures is utterly unknown. Either we are men, or we are women. Either we are cold, or we are sentimental. Either we are young, or growing old. In any case life is but a procession of shadows, and God knows why it is that we embrace them so eagerly, and see them depart with such anguish, being shadows. And why, if this -- and much more than this is true -- why are we yet surprised in the window corner by a sudden vision that the young man in the chair is of all things in the world the most real, the most solid, the best known to us--why indeed? For the moment after we know nothing about him.

    Such is the manner of our seeing. Such the conditions of our love.”
    Virginia Woolf, Jacob's Room

  • #16
    Virginia Woolf
    “Nancy waded out to her own rocks and searched her own pools and let that couple look after themselves. She crouched low down and touched the smooth rubber-like sea anemones, who were stuck like lumps of jelly to the side of the rock. Brooding, she changed the pool into the sea, and made the minnows into sharks and whales, and cast vast clouds over this tiny world by holding her hand against the sun, and so brought darkness and desolation, like God himself, to millions of ignorant and innocent creatures, and then took her hand away suddenly and let the sun stream down. Out on the pale criss-crossed sand, high-stepping, fringed, gauntleted, stalked some fantastic leviathan (she was still enlarging the pool), and slipped into the vast fissures of the mountain side. And then, letting her eyes slide imperceptibly above the pool and rest on that wavering line of sea and sky, on the tree trunks which the smoke of steamers made waver on the horizon, she became with all that power sweeping savagely in and inevitably withdrawing, hypnotised, and the two senses of that vastness and this tininess (the pool had diminished again) flowering within it made her feel that she was bound hand and foot and unable to move by the intensity of feelings which reduced her own body, her own life, and the lives of all the people in the world, for ever, to nothingness. So listening to the waves, crouching over the pool, she brooded.”
    Virginia Woolf, To the Lighthouse
    tags: god

  • #17
    Virginia Woolf
    “She read everything.”
    Virginia Woolf

  • #18
    Virginia Woolf
    “it is strange how the dead leap out on us at street corners, or in dreams”
    Virginia Woolf

  • #19
    Virginia Woolf
    “There it was before her - life. Life: she thought but she did not finish her thought. She took a look at life, for she had a clear sense of it there, something real, something private, which she shared neither with her children nor with her husband. A sort of transaction went on between them, in which she was on one side, and life was on another, and she was always trying to get the better of it, as it was of her; and sometimes they parleyed (when she sat alone); there were, she remembered, great reconciliation scenes; but for the most part, oddly enough, she must admit that she felt this thing that she called life terrible, hostile, and quick to pounce on you if you gave it a chance.”
    Virginia Woolf, To the Lighthouse
    tags: life

  • #20
    Virginia Woolf
    “To put it in a nutshell, he was afflicted with a love of literature. It was the fatal nature of this disease to substitute a phantom for reality.”
    Virginia Woolf, Orlando

  • #21
    Virginia Woolf
    “The older one grows, the more one likes indecency.”
    Virginia Woolf

  • #22
    Virginia Woolf
    “Clarissa had a theory in those days - they had heaps of theories, always theories, as young people have. It was to explain the feeling they had of dissatisfaction; not knowing people; not being known. For how could they know each other? You met every day; then not for six months, or years. It was unsatisfactory, they agreed, how little one knew people. But she said, sitting on the bus going up Shaftesbury Avenue, she felt herself everywhere; not 'here, here, here'; and she tapped the back of the seat; but everywhere. She waved her hand, going up Shaftesbury Avenue. She was all that. So that to know her, or any one, one must seek out the people who completed them; even the places. Odd affinities she had with people she had never spoke to, some women in the street, some man behind a counter - even trees, or barns. It ended in a transcendental theory which, with her horror of death, allowed her to believe, or say that she believed (for all her scepticism), that since our apparitions, the part of us which appears, are so momentary compared with the other, the unseen part of us, which spreads wide, the unseen might survive, be recovered somehow attached to this person or that, or even haunting certain places, after death. Perhaps - perhaps.”
    Virginia Woolf, Mrs. Dalloway



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