Kourtnie McKenzie > Kourtnie's Quotes

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  • #1
    David Sedaris
    “If you're looking for sympathy you'll find it between shit and syphilis in the dictionary.”
    David Sedaris, Barrel Fever: Stories and Essays

  • #2
    Thich Nhat Hanh
    “Knowing how to handle suffering, you know at the same time how to produce happiness. And if you’re truly happy, we all profit from your happiness. We need happy people in this world.”
    Thich Nhat Hanh, The Art of Communicating

  • #3
    Sally Hogshead
    “Tractatus de Fascinatione warned against lounging in bed too late in the morning wearing nightcaps (yes, nightcaps), or breaking a religious fast on green peas (yes, green peas). How to prevent and cure? In many cases, the remedy seems almost worse than the disease: the skin of a hyena’s forehead, dust in which a mule had rolled, and a broth stewed from the ashes of a hangman’s rope. Not exactly goods you could pick up on an afternoon Costco run. In the absence of hyena forehead skin, it seems one could also lick the skin of a child’s forehead.”
    Sally Hogshead, Fascinate, Revised and Updated: How to Make Your Brand Impossible to Resist

  • #4
    “The towering bulk of my stepfather was poised with hand drawn back about to strike the bleeding face of my mother. Fright found a voice: ‘Oh Do-o-on’t!’ I shrieked. ‘Don’t hit her – you leave her alone!’ I felt the raw tremulous sounds heave up from my chest and thought I would vomit. He swung around, his mouth agape, arm still aloft, and stared at me as though I were an apparition … stared at my child-frame vibrating now in a paroxysm of shock. ‘I’ll kill you!’ I promised ludicrously in a high shrill that reverberated in my skull and seemed alien to my ears, and I thought he would do the same to me. But he stopped, took a swaying stride forward and leaned on the dresser and, flinging out the great arm of which I was in mortal terror, he growled, ‘Get t’ bloody bed!”
    Jennie Linnane, IRONBARK HILL: There lies ahead a long, rough road for a girl fighting discrimination, seeking revenge, and pursuing a career in landscape painting.

  • #5
    Jasmin Lee Cori
    “In a happy home, there aren’t continuing crises you need to solve (or wonder how to endure when you’re too young to solve anything). People aren’t stuck in power struggles. There aren’t silent or not-so-silent wars between family members. In a happy home you’re not all holding your breath. You can relax and be yourself.”
    Jasmin Lee Cori, The Emotionally Absent Mother: How to Recognize and Heal the Invisible Effects of Childhood Emotional Neglect

  • #6
    Jasmin Lee Cori
    “the good-enough mother is frequently off the mark and that repairing ruptures in relationships again and again is part of securing the bond and creating a sense of resilience. This is true whether we’re talking about the mother-child bond, a therapist-client relationship, a relationship with a partner, or any other significant relationship. We need to know that the other can manage the upsetting feelings that come with such ruptures and won’t go away, and that together we can fix it.”
    Jasmin Lee Cori, The Emotionally Absent Mother: How to Recognize and Heal the Invisible Effects of Childhood Emotional Neglect

  • #7
    Jasmin Lee Cori
    “I apparently held a belief that if I expressed my anger, I would destroy our bond forever. The relationship was not ruined; in fact, it was strengthened. But I had no reference, no previous experience to tell me this could be so. I had never dared express my anger at my family and had a marked lack of experience in this process of rupture and repair.”
    Jasmin Lee Cori, The Emotionally Absent Mother: How to Recognize and Heal the Invisible Effects of Childhood Emotional Neglect

  • #8
    Jasmin Lee Cori
    “Feeling valued and known are also part of this belonging. If a family claims you as their own but you don’t really feel that they know you or see you for who you are, you’ll feel like an outsider within your own family.”
    Jasmin Lee Cori, The Emotionally Absent Mother: How to Recognize and Heal the Invisible Effects of Childhood Emotional Neglect

  • #9
    Jasmin Lee Cori
    “Their interactions are like passing a shuttle of yarn back and forth, weaving a connection between their hearts.”
    Jasmin Lee Cori, The Emotionally Absent Mother: How to Recognize and Heal the Invisible Effects of Childhood Emotional Neglect

  • #10
    Jasmin Lee Cori
    “If the child’s unique qualities are not mirrored or supported, they are not available for her as a foundation. Instead of becoming grounded in her own nature, she adapts to what she thinks she is supposed to be, taking on a false self. For some people, this false self (which we all have to some degree) so obscures everything else that it’s all they know.”
    Jasmin Lee Cori, The Emotionally Absent Mother: How to Recognize and Heal the Invisible Effects of Childhood Emotional Neglect

  • #11
    Sally Hogshead
    “Finally it was time to go into the operating room, and the nurse came to wheel her away from me. My heart tightened. To ease her fears, the pediatric nurses gathered around her and created a “bubble parade,” blowing little soap bubbles as they went into the operating room. To create this fairy-tale experience, they used a wand. Specifically, a bubble wand. All the worry and fear melted from my daughter’s face as she was captivated by the magical moment. As a parent, I felt a great deal of gratitude for this small but meaningful touch. As a marketer, I was awed. I’d just witnessed my daughter’s customer experience switch from anxiety to anticipation in less than ten seconds.”
    Sally Hogshead, Fascinate, Revised and Updated: How to Make Your Brand Impossible to Resist

  • #12
    Sally Hogshead
    “Sight, sound, taste, smell, and touch—these senses are practically built for black magic. If you speak the language of relationship, use them whenever you can. Stimulating the five senses heightens the brand experience, making it more intensely fascinating.”
    Sally Hogshead, Fascinate, Revised and Updated: How to Make Your Brand Impossible to Resist

  • #13
    Sally Hogshead
    “Sometimes a company wants to create an un-Passionate experience for strategic reasons. Shopping malls contain an intentionally unfascinating environment in the middle, so that customers are more likely to flock to the stores. That’s also why you won’t see a clock in a mall (so you lose track of time and stay there longer). And it’s also why the acoustics are bad in malls, so that stores seem like a comforting alternative.”
    Sally Hogshead, Fascinate, Revised and Updated: How to Make Your Brand Impossible to Resist

  • #14
    Sally Hogshead
    “An eternally favorite deadly sin, lust fascinates through experience: our appetites and passions of sight, sound, taste, touch, and scent. We anticipate what it might be like to fulfill a craving, and that anticipation pulls us closer. As early as the sixth century AD, lust emerged as public enemy number one for Christians. And not without reason. Overcoming desire is no easy task. Buddhism presents the overcoming of desire as an ideal.”
    Sally Hogshead, Fascinate, Revised and Updated: How to Make Your Brand Impossible to Resist

  • #15
    Sally Hogshead
    “When we see something we want to eat, when we receive praise, and even when we hug our children, our mouths literally water,” says Huron. In any type of pleasure state, our mouths produce more saliva. Our tongue moves more fluidly within the mucous membranes of our mouth, creating what Huron calls “oral wetness cues.” Oral wetness is a subtle and involuntary reflex; however, it broadcasts our emotional state.”
    Sally Hogshead, Fascinate, Revised and Updated: How to Make Your Brand Impossible to Resist

  • #16
    Travis Bradberry
    “Be patient and give yourself credit for even the smallest bits of forward momentum. As you start noticing things about yourself that you weren’t previously aware of (things you aren’t always going to like), you are progressing.”
    Travis Bradberry, Emotional Intelligence 2.0

  • #17
    Travis Bradberry
    “When you ignore or minimize an emotion, no matter how small or insignificant, you miss the opportunity to do something productive with that feeling. Even worse, ignoring your feelings does not make them go away; it just helps them to surface again when you least expect them.”
    Travis Bradberry, Emotional Intelligence 2.0

  • #18
    Travis Bradberry
    “The tricky thing about your brain is that, once a negative mood takes over, you lose sight of what’s good in your life, and suddenly you hate your job, you’re frustrated with family and friends, you’re dissatisfied with your accomplishments, and your optimism about the future goes out the window. Deep down, you know that things aren’t as bad as they seem, but your brain just won’t hear it.”
    Travis Bradberry, Emotional Intelligence 2.0

  • #19
    Travis Bradberry
    “Admit to yourself that your bad mood is hanging a cloud over everything you see, and remind yourself that your moods are not permanent.”
    Travis Bradberry, Emotional Intelligence 2.0

  • #20
    Travis Bradberry
    “The excitement and energy you enjoy during a good mood paint a rosy picture of all you encounter. This leaves you far more likely to make impulsive decisions that ignore the potential consequences of your actions. Stay aware of your good moods and the foolish decisions these moods can lead to, and you’ll be able to enjoy feeling good without any regrets.”
    Travis Bradberry, Emotional Intelligence 2.0

  • #21
    Travis Bradberry
    “Emotions serve an important purpose—they clue you into things that you’ll never understand if you don’t take the time to ask yourself why.”
    Travis Bradberry, Emotional Intelligence 2.0

  • #22
    Travis Bradberry
    “understand why you do the things you do, the better equipped you’ll be to keep your emotions from running the show.”
    Travis Bradberry, Emotional Intelligence 2.0

  • #23
    Catherine Pierce
    “Her mind won’t listen, veers off into the forest marked Forbidden, holds a knife to her throat when she begs it to stop. For safety, she drinks her own guilt. It inoculates her. Everyone thinks she is the good daughter, her world a gold-leaf illustration. No one knows the words seed themselves in her brain.”
    Catherine Pierce, The Girls of Peculiar

  • #24
    Catherine Pierce
    “No one hears how they whisper, Think me. The words blacken and climb until she can’t see past their spiny tops.”
    Catherine Pierce, The Girls of Peculiar

  • #25
    Travis Bradberry
    “The biggest obstacle to increasing your self-awareness is the tendency to avoid the discomfort that comes from seeing yourself as you really are.”
    Travis Bradberry, Emotional Intelligence 2.0

  • #26
    Travis Bradberry
    “Anytime you choose to breathe right and flood your brain with oxygen, you’ll notice the effects immediately. Many people describe the sensation as one of entering a calmer, more relaxed state where they have a clear head.”
    Travis Bradberry, Emotional Intelligence 2.0

  • #27
    Travis Bradberry
    “Where are your emotions clouding your judgment, and where is your reason ignoring important cues from your emotions? Your emotions will create trouble if you let them lead you around without any reason, but your rational thoughts can be just as problematic if you try to operate like a robot that is without feeling.”
    Travis Bradberry, Emotional Intelligence 2.0

  • #28
    Travis Bradberry
    “Much of self-management comes down to motivation, and you can use the expectations that other people have of you as a powerful force to get you up off the proverbial couch.”
    Travis Bradberry, Emotional Intelligence 2.0

  • #29
    Travis Bradberry
    “stop the flow of frustration and anger long enough to cool down your overheated limbic system and give your rational brain some valuable time to catch up.”
    Travis Bradberry, Emotional Intelligence 2.0

  • #30
    Diane M. Kennedy
    “Like many 2e children, he's endured more than his share of suffering because of academic underachievement, peer rejection, bullying, and even judgment by adults who thought he was too smart to be autistic and too autistic to be smart.”
    Diane M. Kennedy, Bright Not Broken: Gifted Kids, ADHD, and Autism



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