Mark Lawicki > Mark's Quotes

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  • #1
    Lin Yutang
    “Besides the noble art of getting things done, there is the noble art of leaving things undone. The wisdom of life consists in the elimination of non-essentials.”
    Lin Yutang, The Importance of Living

  • #2
    Ernest Hemingway
    “we would be together and have our books and at night be warm in bed together with the windows open and the stars bright.”
    Ernest Hemingway, A Moveable Feast

  • #3
    Ernest Hemingway
    “As I ate the oysters with their strong taste of the sea and their faint metallic taste that the cold white wine washed away, leaving only the sea taste and the succulent texture, and as I drank their cold liquid from each shell and washed it down with the crisp taste of the wine, I lost the empty feeling and began to be happy and to make plans.”
    Ernest Hemingway, A Moveable Feast

  • #4
    Ernest Hemingway
    “There is never any ending to Paris and the memory of each person who has lived in it differs from that of any other. We always returned to it no matter who we were or how it was changed or with what difficulties, or ease, it could be reached. Paris was always worth it and you received return for whatever you brought to it. But this is how Paris was in the early days when we were very poor and very happy.”
    Ernest Hemingway, A Moveable Feast

  • #5
    Ernest Hemingway
    “With so many trees in the city, you could see the spring coming each day until a night of warm wind would bring it suddenly in one morning. Sometimes the heavy cold rains would beat it back so that it would seem that it would never come and that you were losing a season out of your life. This was the only truly sad time in Paris because it was unnatural. You expected to be sad in the fall. Part of you died each year when the leaves fell from the trees and their branches were bare against the wind and the cold, wintry light. But you knew there would always be the spring, as you knew the river would flow again after it was frozen. When the cold rains kept on and killed the spring, it was as though a young person had died for no reason.

    In those days, though, the spring always came finally but it was frightening that it had nearly failed.”
    Ernest Hemingway, A Moveable Feast

  • #6
    Ernest Hemingway
    “When you have two people who love each other, are happy and gay and really good work is being done by one or both of them, people are drawn to them as surely as migrating birds are drawn at night to a powerful beacon. If the two people were as solidly constructed as the beacon there would be little damage except to the birds. Those who attract people by their happiness and their performance are usually inexperienced. They do not know how not to be overrun and how to go away. They do not always learn about the good, the attractive, the charming, the soon-beloved, the generous, the understanding rich who have no bad qualities and who give each day the quality of a festival and who, when they have passed and taken the nourishment they needed, leave everything deader than the roots of any grass Attila's horses' hooves have ever scoured.”
    Ernest Hemingway, A Moveable Feast

  • #7
    Ernest Hemingway
    “People were always the limiters of happiness except for the very few that were as good as spring itself.”
    Ernest Hemingway, A Moveable Feast: The Restored Edition

  • #8
    Ernest Hemingway
    “But sometimes when I was starting a new story and I could not get it going, I would sit in front of the fire and squeeze the peel of the little oranges into the edge of the flame and watch the sputter of blue that they made. I would stand and look out over the roofs of Paris and think, 'Do not worry. You have always written before and you will write now. All you have to do is write one true sentence. Write the truest sentence that you know.' So finally I would write one true sentence, and then go on from there.”
    Ernest Hemingway, A Moveable Feast

  • #9
    Ernest Hemingway
    “Nobody climbs on skis now and almost everybody breaks their legs but maybe it is easier in the end to break your legs than to break your heart although they say that everything breaks now and that sometimes, afterwards, many are stronger at the broken places.”
    Ernest Hemingway, A Moveable Feast



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