Sumashini Sundararajan > Sumashini's Quotes

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  • #1
    Harper Lee
    “You never really understand a person until you consider things from his point of view... Until you climb inside of his skin and walk around in it.”
    Harper Lee, To Kill a Mockingbird

  • #2
    Harper Lee
    “The one thing that doesn't abide by majority rule is a person's conscience.”
    Harper Lee, To Kill a Mockingbird

  • #3
    Harper Lee
    “Atticus told me to delete the adjectives and I'd have the facts.”
    Harper Lee, To Kill a Mockingbird

  • #4
    Harper Lee
    “With him, life was routine; without him, life was unbearable.”
    Harper Lee, To Kill a Mockingbird

  • #5
    Harper Lee
    “You just hold your head high and keep those fists down. No matter what anybody says to you, don't you let 'em get your goat. Try fightin' with your head for a change.
    -Atticus Finch”
    Harper Lee, To Kill a Mockingbird

  • #6
    Bill Bryson
    “There are three stages in scientific discovery. First, people deny that it is true, then they deny that it is important; finally they credit the wrong person.”
    Bill Bryson, A Short History of Nearly Everything

  • #7
    Bill Bryson
    “It is easy to overlook this thought that life just is. As humans we are inclined to feel that life must have a point. We have plans and aspirations and desires. We want to take constant advantage of the intoxicating existence we've been endowed with. But what's life to a lichen? Yet its impulse to exist, to be , is every bit as strong as ours-arguably even stronger. If I were told that I had to spend decades being a furry growth on a rock in the woods, I believe I would lose the will to go on. Lichens don't. Like virtually all living things, they will suffer any hardship, endure any insult, for a moment's additions existence. Life, in short just wants to be.”
    Bill Bryson, A Short History of Nearly Everything

  • #8
    Bill Bryson
    “Geologists are never at a loss for paperweights.”
    Bill Bryson, A Short History of Nearly Everything

  • #9
    Bill Bryson
    “Taxonomy is described sometimes as a science and sometimes as an art, but really it’s a battleground.”
    Bill Bryson, A Short History of Nearly Everything

  • #10
    Bill Bryson
    “What sets the carbon atom apart is that it is shamelessly promiscuous.”
    Bill Bryson, A Short History of Nearly Everything

  • #11
    Frédéric Bastiat
    “In fact, if law were restricted to protecting all persons, all liberties, and all properties; if law were nothing more than the organized combination of the individual's right to self-defense; if law were the obstacle, the check, the punisher of all oppression and plunder — is it likely that we citizens would then argue much about the extent of the franchise?”
    Frédéric Bastiat, The Law

  • #12
    Frédéric Bastiat
    “In the first place, it would efface from everybody’s
    conscience the distinction between justice and injustice.
    No society can exist unless the laws are respected to a cer-
    tain degree, but the safest way to make them respected is
    to make them respectable. When law and morality are in
    contradiction to each other, the citizen finds himself in
    the cruel alternative of either losing his moral sense, or of
    losing his respect for the law—two evils of equal magni-
    tude, between which it would be difficult to choose.”
    Frédéric Bastiat, The Law

  • #13
    Frédéric Bastiat
    “Oh, sublime writers! Please remember sometimes that this clay, this sand, and this manure which you so arbitrarily dispose of, are men! They are your equals! They are intelligent and free human beings like yourselves! As you have, they too have received from God the faculty to observe, to plan ahead, to think, and to judge for themselves!”
    Frédéric Bastiat, The Law

  • #14
    Frédéric Bastiat
    “What Is Liberty? Actually, what is the political struggle that we witness? It is the instinctive struggle of all people toward liberty. And what is this liberty, whose very name makes the heart beat faster and shakes the world? Is it not the union of all liberties -- liberty of conscience, of education, of association, of the press, of travel, of labor, of trade? In short, is not liberty the freedom of every person to make full use of his faculties, so long as he does not harm other persons while doing so? Is not liberty the destruction of all despotism -- including, of course, legal despotism? Finally, is not liberty the restricting of the law only to its rational sphere of organizing the right of the individual to lawful self- defense; of punishing injustice?”
    Frédéric Bastiat, The Law

  • #15
    Frédéric Bastiat
    “Law and Charity Are Not the Same”
    Frederick Bastiat, The Law

  • #16
    Frédéric Bastiat
    “It seems to me that this is theoretically right, for whatever the question under discussion -- whether religious, philosophical, political, or economic; whether it concerns prosperity, morality, equality, right, justice, progress, responsibility, cooperation, property, labor, trade, capital, wages, taxes, population, finance, or government -- at whatever point on the scientific horizon I begin my researches, I invariably reach this one conclusion: The solution to the problems of human relationships is to be found in liberty.”
    Frédéric Bastiat, The Law

  • #17
    Frédéric Bastiat
    “The state is that great fiction by which everyone tries to live at the expense of everyone else.”
    Frederic Bastiat

  • #18
    Douglas Adams
    “For instance, on the planet Earth, man had always assumed that he was more intelligent than dolphins because he had achieved so much—the wheel, New York, wars and so on—whilst all the dolphins had ever done was muck about in the water having a good time. But conversely, the dolphins had always believed that they were far more intelligent than man—for precisely the same reasons.”
    Douglas Adams, The Hitchhiker's Guide to the Galaxy

  • #19
    Douglas Adams
    “Time is an illusion. Lunchtime doubly so.”
    Douglas Adams, The Hitchhiker's Guide to the Galaxy

  • #20
    Markus Zusak
    “I wanted to tell the book thief many things, about beauty and brutality. But what could I tell her about those things that she didn't already know? I wanted to explain that I am constantly overestimating and underestimating the human race-that rarely do I ever simply estimate it. I wanted to ask her how the same thing could be so ugly and so glorious, and its words and stories so damning and brilliant.”
    Markus Zusak, The Book Thief

  • #21
    Markus Zusak
    “A DEFINITION NOT FOUND
    IN THE DICTIONARY
    Not leaving: an act of trust and love,
    often deciphered by children”
    Markus Zusak, The Book Thief

  • #22
    Markus Zusak
    “People observe the colors of a day only at its beginnings and ends, but to me it's quite clear that a day merges through a multitude of shades and intonations with each passing moment. A single hour can consist of thousands of different colors. Waxy yellows, cloud-spot blues. Murky darkness. In my line of work, I make it a point to notice them.”
    Marcus Zusak, The Book Thief

  • #23
    Markus Zusak
    “So much good, so much evil. Just add water.”
    Markus Zusak, The Book Thief

  • #24
    Markus Zusak
    “I have hated words and I have loved them, and I hope I have made them right.”
    Markus Zusak, The Book Thief

  • #25
    Markus Zusak
    “Like most misery, it started with apparent happiness.”
    Markus Zusak, The Book Thief

  • #26
    Markus Zusak
    “Two weeks to change the world, fourteen days to destroy it.”
    Markus Zusak, The Book Thief

  • #27
    Markus Zusak
    “Can a person steal happiness? Or is just another internal, infernal human trick?”
    Markus Zusak, The Book Thief



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