Tammy Jimenez > Tammy's Quotes

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  • #1
    C.S. Lewis
    “Next to the Blessed Sacrament itself, your neighbor is the holiest object presented to your senses.”
    C.S. Lewis, The Weight of Glory

  • #2
    C.S. Lewis
    “It would seem that Our Lord finds our desires not too strong, but too weak. We are half-hearted creatures, fooling about with drink and sex and ambition when infinite joy is offered us, like an ignorant child who wants to go on making mud pies in a slum because he cannot imagine what is meant by the offer of a holiday at the sea. We are far too easily pleased.”
    C.S. Lewis, The Weight of Glory, and Other Addresses

  • #3
    C.S. Lewis
    “The books or the music in which we thought the beauty was located
    will betray us if we trust to them; it was not in them, it only came through them,and what came through them was longing.
    These things—the beauty, the memory of our own past—are good images of what we
    really desire; but if they are mistaken for the thing itself they turn into dumb idols,breaking the hearts of their worshippers.
    For they are not the thing itself; they are only the scent of a flower we have not found, the echo of a tune we have not heard, news from a country we have never yet visited.”
    C.S. Lewis, The Weight of Glory

  • #4
    C.S. Lewis
    “At present we are on the outside of the world, the wrong side of the door. We discern the freshness and purity of morning, but they do not make us fresh and pure. We cannot mingle with the splendours we see. But all the leaves of the New Testament are rustling with the rumour that it will not always be so. Some day, God willing, we shall get in.”
    C.S. Lewis, The Weight of Glory

  • #5
    C.S. Lewis
    “To please God… to be a real ingredient in the divine happiness… to be loved by God, not merely pitied, but delighted in as an artist delights in his work or a father in a son- it seems impossible, a weight or burden of glory which our thoughts can hardly sustain. But so it is.”
    C.S. Lewis, The Weight of Glory

  • #6
    C.S. Lewis
    “100 per cent of us die, and the percentage cannot be increased. ”
    C.S. Lewis, The Weight of Glory

  • #7
    C.S. Lewis
    “I have received no assurance that anything we can do will eradicate suffering. I think the best results are obtained by people who work quietly away at limited objectives, such as the abolition of the slave trade, or prison reform, or factory acts, or tuberculosis, not by those who think they can achieve universal justice, or health, or peace. I think the art of life consists in tackling each immediate evil as well as we can.”
    C.S. Lewis, The Weight of Glory

  • #8
    C.S. Lewis
    “It may be possible for each to think too much of his own potential glory hereafter; it is hardly possible for him to think too often or too deeply about that of his neighbor. The load, or weight, or burden of my neighbor's glory should be laid daily on my back, a load so heavy that only humility can carry it, and the backs of the proud will be broken. ...

    "It is in light of these overwhelming possibilities, it is with the awe and the circumspection proper to them, that we should conduct all our dealings with one another, all friendships, all loves, all play, all politics. There are no ordinary people. You have never talked to a mere mortal. Nations, cultures, arts, civilizations -- these are mortal, and their life is to ours as the life of a gnat. But it is immortals whom we joke with, work with, marry, snub and exploit. ... Next to the Blessed Sacrament itself, your neighbor is the holiest object presented to your senses.”
    C.S. Lewis, The Weight of Glory

  • #9
    C.S. Lewis
    “If you asked twenty good men to-day what they thought the highest of the virtues, nineteen of them would reply, Unselfishness. But if you asked almost any of the great Christians of old he would have replied, Love - You see what has happened? A negative term has been substituted for a positive, and this is of more than philological importance.

    The negative ideal of Unselfishness carries with it the suggestion not primarily of securing good things for others, but of going without them ourselves, as if our abstinence and not their happiness was the important point.”
    C.S. Lewis, The Weight of Glory

  • #10
    C.S. Lewis
    “A thing may be morally neutral and yet the desire for that thing may be dangerous.”
    C.S. Lewis, The Weight of Glory

  • #11
    C.S. Lewis
    “If we consider the unblushing promises of reward … promised in the Gospels, it would seem that our Lord finds our desires not too strong, but too weak. We are half-hearted creatures, fooling about with drink and sex and ambition when infinite joy is offered us, like an ignorant child who wants to go on making mud pies in a slum because he cannot imagine what is meant by the offer of a holiday at sea. We are far too easily pleased.”
    C.S. Lewis, The Weight of Glory

  • #12
    C.S. Lewis
    “...the sun looks down on nothing half so good as a household laughing together over a meal, or two friends talking over a pint of beer, or a man alone reading a book that interests him...”
    C.S. Lewis, The Weight of Glory

  • #13
    C.S. Lewis
    “As long as this deliberate refusal to understand things from above, even where such understanding is possible, continues, it is idle to talk of any final victory over materialism.”
    C.S. Lewis, The Weight of Glory

  • #14
    Neil Gaiman
    “Fairy tales are more than true: not because they tell us that dragons exist, but because they tell us that dragons can be beaten.”
    Neil Gaiman, Coraline

  • #15
    G.K. Chesterton
    “The true soldier fights not because he hates what is in front of him, but because he loves what is behind him.”
    G.K. Chesterton

  • #16
    G.K. Chesterton
    “I would maintain that thanks are the highest form of thought; and that gratitude is happiness doubled by wonder.”
    G.K. Chesterton

  • #17
    G.K. Chesterton
    “I am not absentminded. It is the presence of mind that makes me unaware of everything else.”
    G.K. Chesterton

  • #18
    G.K. Chesterton
    “The way to love anything is to realize that it may be lost.”
    G.K. Chesterton

  • #19
    G.K. Chesterton
    “There are no uninteresting things, only uninterested people.”
    G.K. Chesterton

  • #20
    G.K. Chesterton
    “The Bible tells us to love our neighbors, and also to love our enemies; probably because generally they are the same people.”
    G.K. Chesterton

  • #21
    G.K. Chesterton
    “Without education, we are in a horrible and deadly danger of taking educated people seriously.”
    G.K. Chesterton

  • #22
    G.K. Chesterton
    “There are two ways to get enough. One is to continue to accumulate more and more. The other is to desire less.”
    G.K. Chesterton

  • #23
    G.K. Chesterton
    “The Christian ideal has not been tried and found wanting. It has been found difficult; and left untried.”
    G.K. Chesterton, What's Wrong with the World

  • #24
    G.K. Chesterton
    “Because children have abounding vitality, because they are in spirit fierce and free, therefore they want things repeated and unchanged. They always say, "Do it again"; and the grown-up person does it again until he is nearly dead. For grown-up people are not strong enough to exult in monotony. But perhaps God is strong enough to exult in monotony. It is possible that God says every morning, "Do it again" to the sun; and every evening, "Do it again" to the moon. It may not be automatic necessity that makes all daisies alike; it may be that God makes every daisy separately, but has never got tired of making them. It may be that He has the eternal appetite of infancy; for we have sinned and grown old, and our Father is younger than we.”
    G.K. Chesterton, Orthodoxy

  • #25
    G.K. Chesterton
    “To have a right to do a thing is not at all the same as to be right in doing it.”
    G.K. Chesterton

  • #26
    G.K. Chesterton
    “If there were no God, there would be no atheists.”
    G.K. Chesterton

  • #27
    G.K. Chesterton
    “The traveler sees what he sees. The tourist sees what he has come to see.”
    G.K. Chesterton

  • #28
    G.K. Chesterton
    “An adventure is only an inconvenience rightly considered. An inconvenience is only an adventure wrongly considered.”
    G.K. Chesterton

  • #29
    G.K. Chesterton
    “Religious liberty might be supposed to mean that everybody is free to discuss religion. In practice it means that hardly anybody is allowed to mention it.”
    G.K. Chesterton

  • #30
    G.K. Chesterton
    “There is the great lesson of 'Beauty and the Beast,' that a thing must be loved before it is lovable.”
    G.K. Chesterton



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