Leonardo > Leonardo's Quotes

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  • #1
    Bertrand Russell
    “It has been said that man is a rational animal. All my life I have been searching for evidence which could support this.”
    Bertrand Russell

  • #2
    Bertrand Russell
    “So far as I can remember there is not one word in the Gospels in praise of intelligence.”
    Bertrand Russell

  • #3
    Bertrand Russell
    “If there were in the world today any large number of people who desired their own happiness more than they desired the unhappiness of others, we could have paradise in a few years.”
    Bertrand Russell

  • #4
    Bertrand Russell
    “Not to be absolutely certain is, I think, one of the essential things in rationality.”
    Bertrand Russell, Am I an Atheist or an Agnostic?

  • #5
    Bertrand Russell
    “I believe in using words, not fists. I believe in my outrage knowing people are living in boxes on the street. I believe in honesty. I believe in a good time. I believe in good food. I believe in sex.”
    Bertrand Russell

  • #6
    Bertrand Russell
    “Anything you're good at contributes to happiness.”
    Bertrand Russell

  • #7
    Bertrand Russell
    “To be without some of the things you want is an indispensable part of happiness.”
    Bertrand Russell

  • #8
    Bertrand Russell
    “Collective fear stimulates herd instinct, and tends to produce ferocity toward those who are not regarded as members of the herd.”
    Bertrand Russell, Unpopular Essays

  • #9
    Bertrand Russell
    “Three passions, simple but overwhelmingly strong, have governed my life: the longing for love, the search for knowledge, and unbearable pity for the suffering of mankind. These passions, like great winds, have blown me hither and thither, in a wayward course, over a great ocean of anguish, reaching to the very verge of despair.

    I have sought love, first, because it brings ecstasy - ecstasy so great that I would often have sacrificed all the rest of life for a few hours of this joy. I have sought it, next, because it relieves loneliness--that terrible loneliness in which one shivering consciousness looks over the rim of the world into the cold unfathomable lifeless abyss. I have sought it finally, because in the union of love I have seen, in a mystic miniature, the prefiguring vision of the heaven that saints and poets have imagined. This is what I sought, and though it might seem too good for human life, this is what--at last--I have found.

    With equal passion I have sought knowledge. I have wished to understand the hearts of men. I have wished to know why the stars shine. And I have tried to apprehend the Pythagorean power by which number holds sway above the flux. A little of this, but not much, I have achieved.

    Love and knowledge, so far as they were possible, led upward toward the heavens. But always pity brought me back to earth. Echoes of cries of pain reverberate in my heart. Children in famine, victims tortured by oppressors, helpless old people a burden to their sons, and the whole world of loneliness, poverty, and pain make a mockery of what human life should be. I long to alleviate this evil, but I cannot, and I too suffer.

    This has been my life. I have found it worth living, and would gladly live it again if the chance were offered me.”
    Bertrand Russell

  • #10
    Bertrand Russell
    “The secret of happiness is this: let your interest be as wide as possible and let your reactions to the things and persons who interest you be as far as possible friendly rather than hostile. ”
    Bertrand Russell

  • #11
    Bertrand Russell
    “Neither a man nor a crowd nor a nation can be trusted to act humanely or to think sanely under the influence of a great fear.”
    Bertrand Russell, Unpopular Essays

  • #12
    Bertrand Russell
    “Everything is vague to a degree you do not realize till you have tried to make it precise.”
    Bertrand Russell

  • #13
    Bertrand Russell
    “Man is a credulous animal, and must believe something; in the absence of good grounds for belief, he will be satisfied with bad ones.”
    Bertrand Russell, Unpopular Essays

  • #14
    Bertrand Russell
    “Sin is geographical.”
    Bertrand Russell

  • #15
    Bertrand Russell
    “I say quite deliberately that the Christian religion, as organized in its churches, has been and still is the principal enemy of moral progress in the world. ”
    Bertrand Russell

  • #16
    Bertrand Russell
    “The good life is inspired by love and guided by knowledge”
    Bertrand Russell, Human Knowledge: Its Scope and Value

  • #17
    Bertrand Russell
    “It is essential to happiness that our way of living should spring from our own deep impulses and not from the accidental tastes and desires of those who happen to be our neighbors, or even our relations.”
    Bertrand Russell

  • #18
    Bertrand Russell
    “The opinions that are held with passion are always those for which no good ground exists; indeed the passion is the measure of the holders lack of rational conviction. Opinions in politics and religion are almost always held passionately.”
    Bertrand Russell, Sceptical Essays

  • #19
    Bertrand Russell
    “Your writing is never as good as you hoped; but never as bad as you feared.”
    Bertrand Russell

  • #20
    Bertrand Russell
    “Science can teach us, and I think our hearts can teach us, no longer to look around for imaginary supporters, no longer to invent allies in the sky, but rather to look to our own efforts here below to make the world a fit place to live.”
    Bertrand Russell, Why I Am Not a Christian and Other Essays on Religion and Related Subjects

  • #21
    Bertrand Russell
    “A sense of duty is useful in work but offensive in personal relations. People wish to be liked, not to be endured with patient resignation.”
    Bertrand Russell

  • #22
    Bertrand Russell
    “Is there any knowledge in the world which is so certain that no reasonable man could doubt it?”
    Bertrand Russell, The Problems of Philosophy

  • #23
    Bertrand Russell
    “Life is nothing but a competition to be the criminal rather than the victim.”
    Bertrand Russell

  • #24
    Bertrand Russell
    “We have in fact, two kinds of morality, side by side: one which we preach, but do not practice, and another which we practice, but seldom preach.”
    Bertrand Russell

  • #25
    Bertrand Russell
    “Science may set limits to knowledge, but should not set limits to imagination.”
    Bertrand Russell

  • #26
    Bertrand Russell
    “I think that there is far too much work done in the world, that immense harm is caused by the belief that work is virtuous, and that what needs to be preached in modern industrial countries is quite different from what always has been preached.”
    Bertrand Russell

  • #27
    Bertrand Russell
    “The most savage controversies are those about matters as to which there is no good evidence either way.”
    Bertrand Russell

  • #28
    Bertrand Russell
    “Advocates of capitalism are very apt to appeal to the sacred principles of liberty, which are embodied in one maxim: The fortunate must not be restrained in the exercise of tyranny over the unfortunate.”
    Bertrand Russell

  • #29
    Bertrand Russell
    “One of the most powerful of all our passions is the desire to be admired and respected.”
    Bertrand Russell, Sceptical Essays

  • #30
    Bertrand Russell
    “To be able to fill leisure intelligently is the last product of civilization, and at present very few people have reached this level.”
    Bertrand Russell



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