Zaid Mansuri > Zaid's Quotes

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  • #1
    Abraham Lincoln
    “I'm a success today because I had a friend who believed in me and I didn't have the heart to let him down.”
    Abraham Lincoln

  • #2
    Michel de Montaigne
    “Que sçais-je?" (What do I know?)”
    Montaigne

  • #3
    Dolly Parton
    “If your actions create a legacy that inspires others to dream more, learn more, do more and become more, then, you are an excellent leader.”
    Dolly Parton

  • #4
    Virginia Woolf
    “Lock up your libraries if you like; but there is no gate, no lock, no bolt that you can set upon the freedom of my mind.”
    Virginia Woolf, A Room of One's Own

  • #5
    Oliver Goldsmith
    “Our greatest glory is not in never falling, but in rising every time we fall.”
    Oliver Goldsmith, The Citizen of the World, Or, Letters from a Chinese Philosopher, Residing in London, to His Friends in the Country, by Dr. Goldsmith

  • #6
    Jodi Picoult
    “Let me tell you this: if you meet a loner, no matter what they tell you, it's not because they enjoy solitude. It's because they have tried to blend into the world before, and people continue to disappoint them.”
    Jodi Picoult, My Sister's Keeper

  • #7
    Jonathan Safran Foer
    “Sometimes I can hear my bones straining under the weight of all the lives I'm not living.”
    Jonathan Safran Foer, Extremely Loud and Incredibly Close

  • #8
    Jonathan Safran Foer
    “Why didn't I learn to treat everything like it was the last time. My greatest regret was how much I believed in the future.”
    Jonathan Safran Foer, Extremely Loud and Incredibly Close

  • #9
    Jonathan Safran Foer
    “I regret that it takes a life to learn how to live.”
    Jonathan Safran Foer, Extremely Loud and Incredibly Close

  • #10
    Jonathan Safran Foer
    “I think and think and think, I‘ve thought myself out of happiness one million times, but never once into it.”
    Jonathan Safran Foer

  • #11
    Boris Pasternak
    “Lara walked along the tracks following a path worn by pilgrims and then turned into the fields. Here she stopped and, closing her eyes, took a deep breath of the flower-scented air of the broad expanse around her. It was dearer to her than her kin, better than a lover, wiser than a book. For a moment she rediscovered the purpose of her life. She was here on earth to grasp the meaning of its wild enchantment and to call each thing by its right name, or, if this were not within her power, to give birth out of love for life to successors who would do it in her place.”
    Boris Pasternak

  • #12
    Leo Tolstoy
    “All happy families are alike; each unhappy family is unhappy in its own way.”
    Leo Tolstoy , Anna Karenina

  • #13
    David Foster Wallace
    “If what's always distinguished bad writing--flat characters, a narrative world that's clichéd and not recognizably human, etc.--is also a description of today's world, then bad writing becomes an ingenious mimesis of a bad world. If readers simply believe the world is stupid and shallow and mean, then [Bret] Ellis can write a mean shallow stupid novel that becomes a mordant deadpan commentary on the badness of everything. Look man, we'd probably most of us agree that these are dark times, and stupid ones, but do we need fiction that does nothing but dramatize how dark and stupid everything is? In dark times, the definition of good art would seem to be art that locates and applies CPR to those elements of what's human and magical that still live and glow despite the times' darkness. Really good fiction could have as dark a worldview as it wished, but it'd find a way both to depict this world and to illuminate the possibilities for being alive and human in it.

    Postmodern irony and cynicism's become an end in itself, a measure of hip sophistication and literary savvy. Few artists dare to try to talk about ways of working toward redeeming what's wrong, because they'll look sentimental and naive to all the weary ironists. Irony's gone from liberating to enslaving. There's some great essay somewhere that has a line about irony being the song of the prisoner who's come to love his cage… The postmodern founders' patricidal work was great, but patricide produces orphans, and no amount of revelry can make up for the fact that writers my age have been literary orphans throughout our formative years.

    We enter a spiritual puberty where we snap to the fact that the great transcendent horror is loneliness, excluded encagement in the self. Once we’ve hit this age, we will now give or take anything, wear any mask, to fit, be part-of, not be Alone, we young. The U.S. arts are our guide to inclusion. A how-to. We are shown how to fashion masks of ennui and jaded irony at a young age where the face is fictile enough to assume the shape of whatever it wears. And then it’s stuck there, the weary cynicism that saves us from gooey sentiment and unsophisticated naïveté. Sentiment equals naïveté on this continent.

    You burn with hunger for food that does not exist.

    A U. S. of modern A. where the State is not a team or a code, but a sort of sloppy intersection of desires and fears, where the only public consensus a boy must surrender to is the acknowledged primacy of straight-line pursuing this flat and short-sighted idea of personal happiness.”
    David Foster Wallace

  • #14
    Hermann Hesse
    “If you hate a person, you hate something in him that is part of yourself. What isn't part of ourselves doesn't disturb us.”
    Hermann Hesse, Demian. Die Geschichte von Emil Sinclairs Jugend

  • #15
    Annie Dillard
    “Like any child, I slid into myself perfectly fitted, as a diver meets her reflection in a pool. Her fingertips enter the fingertips on the water, her wrists slide up her arms. The diver wraps herself in her reflection wholly, sealing it at the toes, and wears it as she climbs rising from the pool, and ever after.”
    Annie Dillard, An American Childhood

  • #16
    Hermann Hesse
    “There is no escape. You can't be a vagabond and an artist and still be a solid citizen, a wholesome, upstanding man. You want to get drunk, so you have to accept the hangover. You say yes to the sunlight and pure fantasies, so you have to say yes to the filth and the nausea. Everything is within you, gold and mud, happiness and pain, the laughter of childhood and the apprehension of death. Say yes to everything, shirk nothing. Don't try to lie to yourself. You are not a solid citizen. You are not a Greek. You are not harmonious, or the master of yourself. You are a bird in the storm. Let it storm! Let it drive you! How much have you lied! A thousand times, even in your poems and books, you have played the harmonious man, the wise man, the happy, the enlightened man. In the same way, men attacking in war have played heroes, while their bowels twitched. My God, what a poor ape, what a fencer in the mirror man is- particularly the artist- particularly myself!”
    Hermann Hesse

  • #17
    Heraclitus
    “It ever was, and is, and shall be, ever-living fire, in measures being kindled and in measures going out.”
    Heraclitus, Fragments

  • #18
    “To the desert go prophets and hermits; through desert go pilgrims and exiles. Here the leaders of the great religions have sought the therapeutic and spiritual values of retreat, not to escape but to find reality.”
    Paul Shepard, Man in the Landscape: A Historic View of the Esthetics of Nature

  • #19
    Immanuel Kant
    “Two things fill my mind with ever-increasing wonder and awe, the more often and the more intensely the reflection dwells on them: the starry heavens above me and the moral law within me.”
    Immanuel Kant

  • #20
    Meg Cabot
    “Courage is not the absence of fear but rather the judgement that something is more important than fear; The brave may not live forever but the cautious do not live at all.”
    Meg Cabot, The Princess Diaries

  • #21
    Annie Dillard
    “There are no events but thoughts and the heart's hard turning, the heart's slow learning where to love and whom. The rest is merely gossip, and tales for other times.”
    Annie Dillard, Holy the Firm

  • #22
    Flannery O'Connor
    “Anybody who has survived his childhood has enough information about life to last him the rest of his days.”
    Flannery O'Connor, Mystery and Manners: Occasional Prose

  • #23
    Erich Maria Remarque
    “This book is to be neither an accusation nor a confession, and least of all an adventure, for death is not an adventure to those who stand face to face with it. It will try simply to tell of a generation of men who, even though they may have escaped shells, were destroyed by the war.”
    Erich Maria Remarque, All Quiet on the Western Front

  • #24
    Otto Rank
    “What we achieve inwardly will change outer reality.”
    Otto Rank

  • #25
    Heraclitus
    “The Only Thing That Is Constant Is Change -”
    Heraclitus

  • #26
    Ernest Hemingway
    “we would be together and have our books and at night be warm in bed together with the windows open and the stars bright.”
    Ernest Hemingway, A Moveable Feast

  • #27
    Søren Kierkegaard
    “People demand freedom of speech as a compensation for the freedom of thought which they seldom use.”
    Søren Kierkegaard

  • #28
    Kurt Vonnegut
    “We are what we pretend to be, so we must be careful about what we pretend to be.”
    Kurt Vonnegut, Mother Night

  • #29
    Kurt Vonnegut
    “Say what you will about the sweet miracle of unquestioning faith, I consider a capacity for it terrifying and absolutely vile.”
    Kurt Vonnegut, Mother Night

  • #30
    Kurt Vonnegut
    “There are plenty of good reasons for fighting...but no good reason to ever hate without reservation, to imagine that God Almighty hates with you, too. Where's evil? It's that large part of every man that wants to hate without limit, that wants to hate with God on its side. It's that part of every man that finds all kinds of ugliness so attractive....it's that part of an imbecile that punishes and vilifies and makes war gladly.”
    Kurt Vonnegut, Mother Night



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