Rens > Rens's Quotes

Showing 1-30 of 84
« previous 1 3
sort by

  • #1
    Jon   Stewart
    “Yes, reason has been a part of organized religion, ever since two nudists took dietary advice from a talking snake.”
    Jon Stewart

  • #2
    Friedrich Nietzsche
    “The essence of all beautiful art, all great art, is gratitude. ”
    Friedrich Nietzsche

  • #3
    Abraham Lincoln
    “Give me six hours to chop down a tree and I will spend the first four sharpening the axe.”
    Abraham Lincoln

  • #4
    Kevin Kelly
    “When copies are free, you need to sell things that cannot be copied. Well, what can’t be copied? Trust, for instance.”
    Kevin Kelly, The Inevitable: Understanding the 12 Technological Forces That Will Shape Our Future

  • #5
    Simon Sinek
    “Great companies don't hire skilled people and motivate them, they hire already motivated people and inspire them.”
    Simon Sinek, Start with Why: How Great Leaders Inspire Everyone to Take Action

  • #6
    W. Edwards Deming
    “Learning is not cumpulsory... neither is survival.”
    W. Edwards Deming

  • #7
    Bruce Schneier
    “Complexity is the worst enemy of security, and our systems are getting more complex all the time.”
    Bruce Schneier, Data and Goliath: The Hidden Battles to Collect Your Data and Control Your World

  • #8
    Yuval Noah Harari
    “Soon, books will read you while you are reading them.”
    Yuval Noah Harari, Homo Deus: A History of Tomorrow

  • #9
    Yuval Noah Harari
    “In the past, censorship worked by blocking the flow of information. In the 21st century, censorship works by flooding people with irrelevant information. People just don't know what to pay attention to, and they often spend their time investigating and debating side issues.”
    Yuval Noah Harari, Homo Deus: A History of Tomorrow

  • #10
    Tara Westover
    “First find out what you are capable of, then decide who you are.”
    Tara Westover

  • #11
    Seth Godin
    “An artist is someone who uses bravery, insight, creativity, and boldness to challenge the status quo. And an artist takes it personally.”
    Seth Godin, Linchpin: Are You Indispensable?

  • #12
    George Carlin
    “Life is a series of dogs.”
    George Carlin

  • #13
    Ray Dalio
    “If you’re not failing, you’re not pushing your limits, and if you’re not pushing your limits, you’re not maximizing your potential”
    Ray Dalio, Principles: Life and Work

  • #14
    Steven Pinker
    “Institutionalized torture in Christendom was not just an unthinking habit; it had a moral rationale. If you really believe that failing to accept Jesus as one's savior is a ticket to fiery damnation, then torturing a person until he acknowledges this truth is doing him the biggest favor of his life: better a few hours now than an eternity later.”
    Steven Pinker, The Better Angels of Our Nature: Why Violence Has Declined

  • #15
    Gary Vaynerchuk
    “It took thirty-eight years before 50 million people gained access to radios. It took television thirteen years to earn an audience that size. It took Instagram a year and a half.”
    Gary Vaynerchuk, Jab, Jab, Jab, Right Hook: How to Tell Your Story in a Noisy World

  • #16
    Kofi Annan
    “To live is to choose. But to choose well, you must know who you are and what you stand for, where you want to go and why you want to get there.”
    Kofi Annan

  • #17
    Yuval Noah Harari
    “At present, people are happy to give away their most valuable asset—their personal data—in exchange for free email services and funny cat videos. It’s a bit like African and Native American tribes who unwittingly sold entire countries to European imperialists in exchange for colorful beads and cheap trinkets.”
    Yuval Noah Harari, 21 Lessons for the 21st Century

  • #18
    Yuval Noah Harari
    “Questions you cannot answer are usually far better for you than answers you cannot question.”
    Yuval Noah Harari, 21 Lessons for the 21st Century

  • #19
    Yuval Noah Harari
    “Morality doesn’t mean ‘following divine commands’. It means ‘reducing suffering’. Hence in order to act morally, you don’t need to believe in any myth or story. You just need to develop a deep appreciation of suffering.”
    Yuval Noah Harari, 21 Lessons for the 21st Century

  • #20
    Yuval Noah Harari
    “One potential remedy for human stupidity is a dose of humility. National, religious and cultural tensions are made worse by the grandiose feeling that my nation, my religion and my culture are the most important in the world – hence my interests should come before the interests of anyone else, or of humankind as a whole. How can we make nations, religions and cultures a bit more realistic and modest about their true place in the world?”
    Yuval Noah Harari, 21 Lessons for the 21st Century

  • #21
    Kahlil Gibran
    “If you reveal your secrets to the wind,
    you should not blame the wind for
    revealing them to the trees.”
    Kahlil Gibran, The Wanderer

  • #22
    Steven Pinker
    “Left-wing and right-wing political ideologies have themselves become secular religions, providing people with a community of like-minded brethren, a catechism of sacred beliefs, a well-populated demonology, and a beatific confidence in the righteousness of their cause.”
    Steven Pinker, Enlightenment Now: The Case for Reason, Science, Humanism, and Progress

  • #23
    Kai-Fu Lee
    “Cash has disappeared so quickly from Chinese cities that it even “disrupted” crime. In March 2017, a pair of Chinese cousins made headlines with a hapless string of robberies. The pair had traveled to Hangzhou, a wealthy city and home to Alibaba, with the goal of making a couple of lucrative scores and then skipping town. Armed with two knives, the cousins robbed three consecutive convenience stores only to find that the owners had almost no cash to hand over—virtually all their customers were now paying directly with their phones. Their crime spree netted them around $125 each—not even enough to cover their travel to and from Hangzhou—when police picked them up. Local media reported rumors that upon arrest one of the brothers cried out, “How is there no cash left in Hangzhou?”
    Kai-Fu Lee, AI Superpowers: China, Silicon Valley, and the New World Order

  • #24
    Steven Pinker
    “Remember your math: an anecdote is not a trend. Remember your history: the fact that something is bad today doesn't mean it was better in the past. Remember your philosophy: one cannot reason that there's no such thing as reason, or that something is true or good because God said it is. And remember your psychology: much of what we know isn't so, especially when our comrades know it too.

    Keep some perspective. Not every problem is a Crisis, Plague, Epidemic, or Existential Threat, and not every change is the End of This, the Death of That, or the Dawn of a Post-Something Era. Don't confuse pessimism with profundity: problems are inevitable, but problems are solvable, and diagnosing every setback as a symptom of a sick society is a cheap grab for gravitas. Finally, drop the Nietzsche. His ideas may seem edgy, authentic, baad,while humanism seems sappy, unhip, uncool But what's so funny about peace, love, and understanding?”
    Steven Pinker, Enlightenment Now: The Case for Reason, Science, Humanism, and Progress

  • #25
    Cathy O'Neil
    “Big Data processes codify the past. They do not invent the future. Doing that requires moral imagination, and that’s something only humans can provide. We have to explicitly embed better values into our algorithms, creating Big Data models that follow our ethical lead. Sometimes that will mean putting fairness ahead of profit.”
    Cathy O'Neil, Weapons of Math Destruction: How Big Data Increases Inequality and Threatens Democracy

  • #26
    Kai-Fu Lee
    “Each of the three recognized categories—care, service, and education—would encompass a wide range of activities, with different levels of compensation for full- and part-time participation. Care work could include parenting of young children, attending to an aging parent, assisting a friend or family member dealing with illness, or helping someone with mental or physical disabilities live life to the fullest. This category would create a veritable army of people—loved ones, friends, or even strangers—who could assist those in need, offering them what my entrepreneur friend’s touchscreen device for the elderly never could: human warmth. Service work would be similarly broadly defined, encompassing much of the current work of nonprofit groups as well as the kinds of volunteers I saw in Taiwan. Tasks could include performing environmental remediation, leading afterschool programs, guiding tours at national parks, or collecting oral histories from elders in our communities. Participants in these programs would register with an established group and commit to a certain number of hours of service work to meet the requirements of the stipend. Finally, education could range from professional training for the jobs of the AI age to taking classes that could transform a hobby into a career. Some recipients of the stipend will use that financial freedom to pursue a degree in machine learning and use it to find a high-paying job.”
    Kai-Fu Lee, AI Superpowers: China, Silicon Valley, and the New World Order

  • #28
    Steven Pinker
    “The better you know something, the less you remember about how hard it was to learn. The curse of knowledge is the single best explanation I know of why good people write bad prose.”
    Steven Pinker, The Sense of Style: The Thinking Person's Guide to Writing in the 21st Century

  • #29
    Steven Pinker
    “Classic writing, with its assumption of equality between writer and reader, makes the reader feel like a genius. Bad writing makes the reader feel like a dunce.”
    Steven Pinker, The Sense of Style: The Thinking Person's Guide to Writing in the 21st Century

  • #30
    Matthew Walker
    “the shorter your sleep, the shorter your life. The leading causes of disease and death in developed nations—diseases that are crippling health-care systems, such as heart disease, obesity, dementia, diabetes, and cancer—all have recognized causal links to a lack of sleep.”
    Matthew Walker, Why We Sleep: Unlocking the Power of Sleep and Dreams

  • #31
    Matthew Walker
    “It is disquieting to learn that vehicular accidents caused by drowsy driving exceed those caused by alcohol and drugs combined.”
    Matthew Walker, Why We Sleep: Unlocking the Power of Sleep and Dreams



Rss
« previous 1 3