Clarke > Clarke's Quotes

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  • #1
    F. Scott Fitzgerald
    “So we beat on, boats against the current, borne back ceaselessly into the past.”
    F. Scott Fitzgerald, The Great Gatsby

  • #2
    Joseph Conrad
    “My task, which I am trying to achieve is, by the power of the written word, to make you hear, to make you feel--it is, before all, to make you see.”
    Joseph Conrad, Lord Jim

  • #3
    Anthony Bourdain
    “Vegetarians, and their Hezbollah-like splinter-faction, the vegans, are a persistent irritant to any chef worth a damn.

    To me, life without veal stock, pork fat, sausage, organ meat, demi-glace, or even stinky cheese is a life not worth living.

    Vegetarians are the enemy of everything good and decent in the human spirit, an affront to all I stand for, the pure enjoyment of food. The body, these waterheads imagine, is a temple that should not be polluted by animal protein. It's healthier, they insist, though every vegetarian waiter I've worked with is brought down by any rumor of a cold.

    Oh, I'll accomodate them, I'll rummage around for something to feed them, for a 'vegetarian plate', if called on to do so. Fourteen dollars for a few slices of grilled eggplant and zucchini suits my food cost fine.”
    Anthony Bourdain

  • #4
    Graydon Carter
    “Lobster-both-ways is popular tonight. The preparation is easy enough. Take a two-pound lobster. Kill it with a sharp chef’s knife straight between the eyes. Remove the claw and knuckle meat. Steam for five minutes, chop into salad with aioli, celery, and lots of shallots and chives. Chill. Reserve the tail until ordered. Paint with herb-infused oil, season with kosher salt and fresh ground pepper, grill for two or three minutes until it’s just cooked through. Serve with spicy organic greens.”
    Graydon Carter, The Hunger: A Story of Food, Desire, and Ambition

  • #5
    “Lobster-both-ways is popular tonight. The preparation is easy enough. Take a two-pound lobster. Kill it with a sharp chef’s knife straight between the eyes. Remove the claw and knuckle meat. Steam for five minutes, chop into salad with aioli, celery, and lots of shallots and chives. Chill. Reserve the tail until ordered. Paint with herb-infused oil, season with kosher salt and fresh ground pepper, grill for two or three minutes until it’s just cooked through. Serve with spicy organic greens.”
    John Delucie

  • #9
    Lin Yutang
    “No one realizes how beautiful it is to travel until he comes home and rests his head on his old, familiar pillow. ”
    Lin Yutang

  • #10
    Maya Angelou
    “We are only as blind as we want to be.”
    Maya Angelou

  • #11
    “You either get the point of Africa or you don't. What draws me back year after year is that it's like seeing the world with the lid off.”
    A.A. Gill

  • #12
    Gurcharan Das
    “Sleeping in the park in a city is a form of civilization. First, you need a city with enough bustle and clatter to make a person yearn for a calm, green spot. Then you need a first-class park,”
    Gurcharan Das, India Unbound: The Social and Economic Revolution from Independence to the Global Information Age

  • #13
    Paddy Hirsch
    “it wasn’t so much the companies’ strategies that bled them dry as it was the billions of dollars they had borrowed to put their strategies into action.”
    Paddy Hirsch, Man vs. Markets: Economics Explained

  • #14
    Matsuo Bashō
    “Do not seek to follow in the footsteps of the wise; seek what they sought.”
    Matsuo Bashō

  • #15
    Matsuo Bashō
    “The journey itself is my home.”
    Matsuo Bashō

  • #16
    Matsuo Bashō
    “Real poetry, is to lead a beautiful life. To live poetry is better than to write it.”
    Matsuo Bashō

  • #17
    Matsuo Bashō
    “Every day is a journey, and the journey itself is home.”
    Matsuo Bashō

  • #18
    Matsuo Bashō
    “Old dark sleepy pool...
    Quick unexpected frog
    Goes plop! Watersplash!”
    Matsuo Bashō, Japanese Haiku

  • #19
    Chris Brogan
    “Are you using your degree as it was intended in your current job? Lots of people aren't. How is the education system keeping up with the velocity of change in what actually constitutes a real job?”
    Chris Brogan, The Freaks Shall Inherit the Earth: Entrepreneurship for Weirdos, Misfits, and World Dominators

  • #20
    Chris Brogan
    “Complexity serves nothing but our ego. Be able to say what you do in a way that people can understand.”
    Chris Brogan, The Freaks Shall Inherit the Earth: Entrepreneurship for Weirdos, Misfits, and World Dominators

  • #21
    Chris Brogan
    “When people tell you they're busy all the time, they are either very busy because they've not quite learned to master time, or they're not at all busy, but feel embarrassed about this fact.”
    Chris Brogan, The Freaks Shall Inherit the Earth: Entrepreneurship for Weirdos, Misfits, and World Dominators

  • #22
    Ed Catmull
    “The leaders of my department understood that to create a fertile laboratory, they had to assemble different kinds of thinkers and then encourage their autonomy. They had to offer feedback when needed but also had to be willing to stand back and give us room.”
    Ed Catmull, Creativity, Inc.: Overcoming the Unseen Forces That Stand in the Way of True Inspiration

  • #23
    Ed Catmull
    “That they liked so much of what they were doing allowed them to put up with the parts of the job they came to resent. This was a revelation to me: The good stuff was hiding the bad stuff. I realized that this was something I needed to look out for: When downsides coexist with upsides, as they often do, people are reluctant to explore what’s bugging them, for fear of being labeled complainers. I also realized that this kind of thing, if left unaddressed, could fester and destroy”
    Ed Catmull, Creativity, Inc.: Overcoming the Unseen Forces That Stand in the Way of True Inspiration

  • #24
    Ed Catmull
    “Communication would no longer have to go through hierarchical channels. The exchange of information was key to our business, of course, but I believed that it could—and frequently should—happen out of order, without people getting bent out of shape. People talking directly to one another, then letting the manager find out later, was more efficient than trying to make sure that everything happened in the “right” order and through the “proper” channels.”
    Ed Catmull, Creativity, Inc.: Overcoming the Unseen Forces That Stand in the Way of True Inspiration

  • #25
    Ed Catmull
    “Telling the truth is difficult, but inside a creative company, it is the only way to ensure excellence. It is the job of the manager to watch the dynamics in the room, although sometimes a director will come in after a meeting to say that some people were holding back.”
    Ed Catmull, Creativity, Inc.: Overcoming the Unseen Forces That Stand in the Way of True Inspiration

  • #26
    Peter Hessler
    “I began to see motorcyclists who had attached computer discs to their back mudflaps, because they made good reflectors. In a place called Xingwuying, locals climbed the Great Wall whenever they wanted to receive a cell phone signal.”
    Peter Hessler, Country Driving: A Journey Through China from Farm to Factory

  • #27
    Peter Hessler
    “a foreigner often feels most foreign while witnessing the early education of another culture.”
    Peter Hessler, Country Driving: A Journey Through China from Farm to Factory

  • #28
    Peter Hessler
    “One challenge for a foreign correspondent is to figure out how much of yourself to include: If a story is too self-centered, it becomes a tourist’s diary. These days, the general trend is to reduce the writer’s presence, often to the point of invisibility. This is the standard approach of newspapers, and it’s described as a way of maintaining focus and impartiality. But it can make the subject feel even more distant and foreign. When I wrote about people, I wanted to describe the ways we interacted, the things we shared and the things that separated us.”
    Peter Hessler, Strange Stones: Dispatches from East and West

  • #29
    Eric Schmidt
    “In this traditional command-and-control structure, data flows up to the executives from all over the organization, and decisions subsequently flow down. This approach is designed to slow things down, and it accomplishes the task very well. Meaning that at the very moment when businesses must permanently accelerate, their architecture is working against them.”
    Eric Schmidt, How Google Works

  • #30
    Eric Schmidt
    “offer management tracks for people with the greatest potential, whereby these stars rotate in and out of different roles every two years or so. But this approach emphasizes the development of management skills, not technical ones. As a result, most knowledge workers in traditional environments develop deep technical expertise but little breadth, or broad management expertise but no technical depth.”
    Eric Schmidt, How Google Works

  • #31
    Eric Schmidt
    “Smart creatives thrive on interacting with each other. The mixture you get when you cram them together is combustible, so a top priority must be to keep them crowded.”
    Eric Schmidt, How Google Works

  • #32
    Eric Schmidt
    “Debbie Biondolillo, Apple’s former head of human resources, who said, “Your title makes you a manager. Your people make you a leader.”
    Eric Schmidt, How Google Works

  • #33
    Eric Schmidt
    “You should never be able to reverse engineer a company’s organizational chart from the design of its product.”
    Eric Schmidt, How Google Works



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