Marcela Gagliardi > Marcela's Quotes

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  • #1
    Whitney Otto
    “Why are old lovers able to become friends? Two reasons. They never truly loved each other, or they love each other still.”
    Whitney Otto, How to Make an American Quilt

  • #2
    Vincent van Gogh
    “Close friends are truly life's treasures. Sometimes they know us better than we know ourselves. With gentle honesty, they are there to guide and support us, to share our laughter and our tears. Their presence reminds us that we are never really alone.”
    Vincent van Gogh

  • #3
    Frank Zappa
    “So many books, so little time.”
    Frank Zappa

  • #4
    Oscar Wilde
    “Be yourself; everyone else is already taken.”
    Oscar Wilde

  • #5
    Albert Einstein
    “Two things are infinite: the universe and human stupidity; and I'm not sure about the universe.”
    Albert Einstein

  • #6
    Marcus Tullius Cicero
    “A room without books is like a body without a soul.”
    Marcus Tullius Cicero

  • #7
    Dr. Seuss
    “You know you're in love when you can't fall asleep because reality is finally better than your dreams.”
    Dr. Seuss

  • #8
    Mae West
    “You only live once, but if you do it right, once is enough.”
    Mae West

  • #9
    Mahatma Gandhi
    “Be the change that you wish to see in the world.”
    Mahatma Gandhi

  • #10
    Robert Frost
    “In three words I can sum up everything I've learned about life: it goes on.”
    Robert Frost

  • #11
    J.K. Rowling
    “If you want to know what a man's like, take a good look at how he treats his inferiors, not his equals.”
    J.K. Rowling, Harry Potter and the Goblet of Fire

  • #12
    Friendship ... is born at the moment when one man says to another What! You
    “Friendship ... is born at the moment when one man says to another "What! You too? I thought that no one but myself . . .”
    C.S. Lewis, The Four Loves

  • #13
    Friedrich Nietzsche
    “Without music, life would be a mistake.”
    Friedrich Nietzsche, Twilight of the Idols

  • #14
    Jane Austen
    “You pierce my soul. I am half agony, half hope...I have loved none but you.”
    Jane Austen, Persuasion

  • #15
    Jane Austen
    “I can listen no longer in silence. I must speak to you by such means as are within my reach. You pierce my soul. I am half agony, half hope. Tell me not that I am too late, that such precious feelings are gone for ever. I offer myself to you again with a heart even more your own than when you almost broke it, eight years and a half ago. Dare not say that man forgets sooner than woman, that his love has an earlier death. I have loved none but you. Unjust I may have been, weak and resentful I have been, but never inconstant. You alone have brought me to Bath. For you alone, I think and plan. Have you not seen this? Can you fail to have understood my wishes? I had not waited even these ten days, could I have read your feelings, as I think you must have penetrated mine. I can hardly write. I am every instant hearing something which overpowers me. You sink your voice, but I can distinguish the tones of that voice when they would be lost on others. Too good, too excellent creature! You do us justice, indeed. You do believe that there is true attachment and constancy among men. Believe it to be most fervent, most undeviating, in F. W.

    I must go, uncertain of my fate; but I shall return hither, or follow your party, as soon as possible. A word, a look, will be enough to decide whether I enter your father's house this evening or never.”
    Jane Austen, Persuasion

  • #16
    Jane Austen
    “I do not think I ever opened a book in my life which had not something to say upon woman's inconstancy. Songs and proverbs, all talk of woman's fickleness. But perhaps you will say, these were all written by men."

    "Perhaps I shall. Yes, yes, if you please, no reference to examples in books. Men have had every advantage of us in telling their own story. Education has been theirs in so much higher a degree; the pen has been in their hands. I will not allow books to prove anything.”
    Jane Austen, Persuasion

  • #17
    Jane Austen
    “How quick come the reasons for approving what we like.”
    Jane Austen, Persuasion
    tags: life

  • #18
    Jane Austen
    “One man's ways may be as good as another's, but we all like our own best.”
    Jane Austen, Persuasion

  • #19
    Jane Austen
    “...when pain is over, the remembrance of it often becomes a pleasure.”
    Jane Austen, Persuasion

  • #20
    Jane Austen
    “Now they were as strangers; worse than strangers, for they could never become acquainted.”
    Jane Austen, Persuasion

  • #21
    Jane Austen
    “She had been forced into prudence in her youth, she learned romance as she grew older: the natural sequel of an unnatural beginning.”
    Jane Austen , Persuasion

  • #22
    Jane Austen
    “I declare after all there is no enjoyment like reading! How much sooner one tires of any thing than of a book! -- When I have a house of my own, I shall be miserable if I have not an excellent library.”
    Jane Austen, Pride and Prejudice

  • #23
    Jane Austen
    “Angry people are not always wise.”
    Jane Austen, Pride and Prejudice

  • #24
    Jane Austen
    “There are few people whom I really love, and still fewer of whom I think well. The more I see of the world, the more am I dissatisfied with it; and every day confirms my belief of the inconsistency of all human characters, and of the little dependence that can be placed on the appearance of merit or sense.”
    Jane Austen, Pride and Prejudice

  • #25
    Jane Austen
    “It is a truth universally acknowledged, that a single man in possession of a good fortune, must be in want of a wife.”
    Jane Austen, Pride and Prejudice

  • #26
    Jane Austen
    “There is nothing I would not do for those who are really my friends. I have no notion of loving people by halves, it is not my nature.”
    Jane Austen, Northanger Abbey

  • #27
    Alfred Tennyson
    “If I had a flower for every time I thought of you...I could walk through my garden forever.”
    Alfred Tennyson

  • #28
    A.A. Milne
    “Piglet sidled up to Pooh from behind.
    "Pooh!" he whispered.
    "Yes, Piglet?"
    "Nothing," said Piglet, taking Pooh's paw. "I just wanted to be sure of you.”
    A.A. Milne, The House at Pooh Corner

  • #29
    Sarah Dessen
    “Life is an awful, ugly place to not have a best friend.”
    Sarah Dessen, Someone Like You

  • #30
    Helen Keller
    “I would rather walk with a friend in the dark, than alone in the light.”
    Helen Keller



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