Caitlin  Vail
Caitlin Vail asked:

Spoiler alert: Ironic that Blanche is taken away at the end... removed from mainstream society, when it is Stanley who is harmful to others.

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Hope Meikle Yes, but there are multiple reasons to her being taken away. It wasn't just victim blaming, she had been mentally unstable the entire show.
Phoebe Victim blaming at its best :(
Orinoco Womble (tidy bag and all) That often happens in cases of sexual predators--the victims get blamed for the abuse or called "crazy" and told they made it all up. I speak from experience.
blushenka The entire play revolves around the fact that Stella is unwilling to face the truth about her husband being 'common' and abusive, because that would mean leaving him and she's not ready for that. Having Blanche taken away at the end is also a result of this. 'Know Pearl Jam's song 'Better man'? Yeah, that's Stella's POV, as I see it. She'd sacrifice herself, her sister and even her newborn kid, all for the sake of the 'streetcar named desire', that she got swept away in. Between her and Blanche, I think Stella is the one who could do with some counselling. (Not saying Blanche is not damaged, but like you pointed out, she's not the dangerous one).
Sbenton
This answer contains spoilers… (view spoiler)
Hannah A Maybe Blanche being taken away is Williams commenting on the treatment of mentally unwell people. I read that her unsuitable condition was inspired by his sister who was sent to an asylum and forced to undergo lobotomy (brain surgery). But Stanley and Stella's relationship is in my opinion emotional abuse. Their whole relationship is based around sex and Stanley gets mad because he's cockblocked cos Blanche is around, Another point of irony is that even Blanche who losing her sanity knows that their relationship is wrong. Stella needs as much help as her sister.
Kaia Lonergan I think Blanche was also taken to the madhouse on account of her comments about Shep Huntleigh. She references him several times in the novel, making out that he is her and Stella's salvation, but Stella has no recollection of this supposed Shep, not only that but Blanche never actually gets in contact with Shep though she does write several attempted letters to him. The fact that she believes her own lie at the end of the play about Shep coming to pick her up, shows that her mental state was fragile, whether Stanley had raped her or not. I think Stanley's actions were the catalyst for Blanche's loss of "sanity," for lack of a better word.
Tristan I agree with you, but also with Hope. Blanche's insanity is comparatively not harmful (although she did sleep with her student, an illegal and potentially predatory situation, depending on his age and who initiated the affair), but she most definitely is unstable. I think that she needs some sort of mental help (whether or not she'll get it is debatable).
Aurelio Ippandoza True, but which of these two characters caused a husband's suicide?(to the tune of the Varsouviana Polka,no less)..."deliberate cruelty is unforgivable"...
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