Zedsdead
Zedsdead asked:

For those who've read this, which was your favorite story? Which was your least favorite? Why?

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lisa Scott Lynch's "A Year and a Day in Old Theradane" was FANTASTIC. I wasn't a fan of most of the rest of the collection, but even if I had loved them all Scott's would still stand out. His characters, world-building, and writing were all spot-on (as always).
Clint Fay Okay, so not the most informed answer considering that I'm only three stories down at this point but I felt compelled anyway. "The Lightning Tree" was perfect. I'm bias of course. Rothfuss is a bit of an idol at present but I found a new scribe that I'm particularly excited to get into, in the form of one Scott Lynch. By new, I mean new for me. Usually, and it saddens me to say, I tend to read authors that I'm familiar with in anthologies. With those, even if the story is new and the world that its set in is different than the one that the author typically writes in, I'm accustomed to the way that they write. It tends to still seem natural and easy to read. So after reading Lynch's contribution I was surprised and Impressed that within 40 pages I felt like I had a good understanding of the world and it's patrons. The characters were solid and likeable and the plot, though rather basic was intriguing.

Martin's short story was worth reading but it was a history, not much of a tale. I enjoyed having the information from it but it was more like a well written Wiki than an actual story!
Gehayi Favorite: "A Year and a Day in Old Theradane" by Scott Lynch. The characterization, the world, the imagination of the thieves, and the friendship between them all got to me.

Least favorites: "Bad Brass" by Bradley Denton and "A Better Way to Die" by Paul Cornell. The protagonist of "Bad Brass" was whiny, stalkery and felt entitled to be a burglar. I hated him. And "A Better Way to Die" was just confusing.
Michael Wilson Best... I don't know. I'll have to go back and thumb through it again.


But the only one I straight up abandoned was the George R.R. Martin one. It was just too damn long winded for a short story. I don't mind that sort of thing in an epic novel series. But I won't abide it in short fiction.
Brian Palmer I think Scott Lynch's "A Year and a Day in Old Theradane" was a real standout, as was Connie Willis's "Now Showing" (both are somewhat comedic). My least favorite two were probably probably David Ball's "Provenance" (it struck me as somewhat joyless) and Joe Abercrombie's "Tough Times All Over" (pointless).
Robert Turner The Lightning Tree because it reminded what I was waiting ( zzzz ) for in the Kingkiller Chronicle after that mediocre effort that was The Slow regard. Also because it is quite simply the best story in this book.
Aris Hardin "Tough Times All Over" was good. I liked it a lot. But then, I always like anything written by Joe Abercrombie. "The Lightning Tree" was also good. Patrick Rothfuss never disappoints me with his writings. I'd have to say the best story overall was "A Year and a Day in Old Theradane". It was the first thing I ever read by Scott Lynch and I thought it was really good. I will certainly read more of his work. The main reason I got this book was to sample some authors I had never read just to see whose work I might want to check out in the future and to get my hands on something written by Patrick Rothfuss and Joe Abercrombie that I hadn't already read.
Robin My favorite was "The Lightning Tree" by Patrick Rothfuss. I really connected with the enigmatic character of Bast.

I can't think of a least favorite, plus I didn't read all the stories as some just didn't appeal.
Lorraine Ellis I really liked "The Inn Of The Seven Blessings" by Matthew Hughes, "Heavy Metal" by Cherie Priest, "A Cargo Of Ivories" by Garth Nix, "The Caravan To Nowhere" by Phyllis Eisenstein and "A Year And A Day In Old Theradine" by Scott. I truly LOVED "The Lightning Tree" by Rothfuss and wish it went on for 400 more pages!
Amber I think my personal favorite was Daniel Abraham's The Meaning of Love. He wrote a badass heroine who wasn't a crazy caricature, whom I wanted more of, in a richly realized setting, with a delicious double-cross plot, that didn't require to me to know any backstory from his other work to "get."

The other three I rated just as high, but didn't feel quite as much personal connection to, were Provenance, The Caravan to Nowhere, and (grudgingly) The Lightning Tree.

Least favorite: A Better Way to Die, and The Rogue Prince.
Greg (adds 2 TBR list daily) Hersom That's a hard question; -except for GRRM's- I loved them all. Even the ones that weren't a genre I like at all.
But mine is the The Lightning Tree by Rothfuss, and I'm not a fan of Rothfuss, anymore. (I loved The Name of the Wind but I was barely able to finish The Wise Man's Fear and I won't even attempt the third one.)

That said; GRRM's short; is it even a story? I thought the first rule of writing a story is that a story is not just a telling of events, its got to have a theme, and the characters have to transition. Rogue King, or whatever it was titled, read like fictional history lesson, and not the interesting history lesson kind. The high school history class kind that makes most people hate history.
Richard Willsea I hated. Diamonds from Tequila, who know why. I had hopes "Lightning tree" would tell us more, but it was still good. "How the Marquis Got His Coat Back" was my favorite.
Gehayi Favorite: "A Year and a Day in Old Theradane" by Scott Lynch. The characterization, the world, the imagination of the thieves, and the friendship between them all got to me.

Least favorites: "Bad Brass" by Bradley Denton and "A Better Way to Die" by Paul Cornell. The protagonist of "Bad Brass" was whiny, stalkery and felt entitled to be a burglar. I hated him. And "A Better Way to Die" was just confusing.
Friedrich Sarah E. Thompson I loved "Tough Times All Over" and "What Do You Do", both quick-witted and exciting stories with excellent writing, while my least favourite had to be "The Inn of Seven Blessings" - it felt like every mediocre, cookie-cutter fantasy I've ever read!
Hayla Cherie Priest's "Heavy Metal" was my favorite. I was so sad to see that she hasn't written another book/story with Kilgore - he's a fascinating character.
fióka Absolutely and without any doubt it was Patrick Rothfuss' story - the best from the anthology.
Areir Scott Lynch's "A Year and a Day in Old Theradane" was my favourite! Nice characters, interesting setting, clever plot!
If I can choose one more I'd go for “The Lightning Tree” by Patrick Rothfuss...
Moira Favorite: "A Year and a Day in Old Theradane" by Scott Lynch. Hands down.
Least favorite: "Bent Twig" by Joe R. Lansdale. .... Also hands down. :P
Florian Betz Difficult to pick just one. My favourites - in no particular order - were:
'A Year and a Day in Old Theradane'
'The Lightning Tree'
'The Meaning of Love'
Aaron Schmid What Do You Do by Gillian Flynn is my favorite so far. I've read all of them except for The Lightning Tree, which I'm saving for a Rothfuss binge :D So my answer may change, haha. I also really loved Scott Lynch's story. I "blurbed" and rated each story individually with my formal review :P

My least favorite was Roaring Twenties by Carrie Vaughn - it just did nothing for me. Eisenstein's The Caravan To Nowhere was a close runner up.
Zedsdead Man, it's hard to pick just one. Rothfuss and Lynch were easy top fives for me. Also Abercrombie's "Tough Times All Over", "Meaning of Love" by Abraham, and maybe "Diamonds from Tequila" by WJW.

Least favorite, "Heavy Metal" by Cherie Priest. It was just confusing to me.
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