Joan Oberer
Joan Oberer asked:

is it historical fiction

To answer questions about Natchez Burning, please sign up.
Bravegirl01 Contrary to what Bagman says, the story is *very* real, based on a real-life journalist (Stanley Nelson, editor of the Concordia (LA) Sentinel's body of work on the race murder of Frank Morris in 1964). That murder remains unsolved, and the FBI has closed the file on it. Iles presents what he thinks happened, in fiction form, and actually discusses in the Afterward how his fiction differs from what Nelson and the FBI think what happened (but can't prove). Essentially, Frank Morris refused to fix a white deputy's shoes for free. That's what counted as "uppity" in 1964, and that got Frank Morris killed.

The "Double Eagles, " a sort of uber-Klan group, really existed; some whites really thought blacks existed to be ruled by them; and other whites, who knew better, chose the cowardly way and let the bullies run things. No, it's not "uplifting," but it's real -- look at Baltimore, May 2015.

If all you want is a read that makes no demands on your heart or your conscience, look elsewhere. If you want to watch a popular modern *white* writer try to open people's eyes about race in America, read Iles' body of work. It's not entirely the literary art that Iles' advocates want it to be; it's one ethical man using his gifts with popular fiction to persuade the rest of us to open our eyes.
Bagman Loosely, very loosely. The closest to historical fiction is reference to a few actual Civil Rights events and notable persons of the the era. I only wish it was based more on historical fact, perhaps it wouldn't have been such a chore to finish the book. Needless to say, I was very disappointed.
Image for Natchez Burning
Rate this book
Clear rating

About Goodreads Q&A

Ask and answer questions about books!

You can pose questions to the Goodreads community with Reader Q&A, or ask your favorite author a question with Ask the Author.

See Featured Authors Answering Questions

Learn more