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Polls for Relaxing Fun. Showing 1-30 of 31
created Jan 09, 2009 03:32AM PST poll #1 Featured
7195
What do you enjoy most about this group?

Off topic discussions
 
  7 votes, 36.8%

Reading discussions
 
  6 votes, 31.6%

Other
 
  4 votes, 21.1%

Writing discussions
 
  2 votes, 10.5%


created Jan 04, 2009 04:29AM PST poll #2 Featured
6929
Where do you get your writing ideas?

My life
 
  10 votes 38.5%

Other
 
  8 votes 30.8%

Experiences of others
 
  5 votes 19.2%

Books or TV
 
  3 votes 11.5%

26 total votes

created Feb 24, 2009 01:09AM PST poll #3
(Love and semantics) In Vernon God Little, Vern is on the run and out of money. Suddenly, his dream girl shows up with $600! His comment, in his ironic interior monologue:

"One thing to be proud of: I don't respond to the flood of joy-hormones, the ones that make you want to smell flowers, or say I love you. I contain myself like a man."

What would Vern have meant if he had told the girl that he loved her?

He had both tender and sexual feelings for her
 
  2 votes, 100.0%

He some other kind of feelings for her
 
  0 votes, 0.0%

He had tender (“warm and fuzzy”) feelings for her
 
  0 votes, 0.0%

He had sexual feelings for her
 
  0 votes, 0.0%

He would have been saying something about his feelings, but he would have been lying
 
  0 votes, 0.0%

He wouldn’t have been saying anything at all about his feelings
 
  0 votes, 0.0%


created Feb 24, 2009 01:08AM PST poll #4
(Love and Semantics) In Vernon God Little, Vern is on the run and out of money. Suddenly, his dream girl shows up with $600! His comment, in his ironic interior monologue:

"One thing to be proud of: I don't respond to the flood of joy-hormones, the ones that make you want to smell flowers, or say I love you. I contain myself like a man."

If Vern had told the girl that he loved her, would he have been promising something or asking for some kind of promise from her?

Yes, he would have been making a promise to her. For example, he would have been promising that her well-being was important to him, and that he would always, or for a long time, care about her.
 
  1 vote, 100.0%

Yes, he would have been offering a reciprocal arrangement. For example, he promises to care about her if she feels the same way about him, or something like that.
 
  0 votes, 0.0%

Yes, he would have been asking for a promise from her. For example, he wanted an assurance from her that his well-being was important to her, and that she would always, or for a long time, care about him.
 
  0 votes, 0.0%

As immediately above, but he also wanted her to promise not to make the same offer to anyone else.
 
  0 votes, 0.0%

As immediately above, and he was also promising not to make the same offer to anyone else.
 
  0 votes, 0.0%

As immediately above, but both sides must promise not to make the same offer to anyone else.
 
  0 votes, 0.0%

Yes, he would have been promising something more complicated that doesn’t fit any of the above.
 
  0 votes, 0.0%

He would have been promising something, but he would have been lying.
 
  0 votes, 0.0%

He wouldn’t have been promising anything or asking for any kind of promise.
 
  0 votes, 0.0%


created Feb 24, 2009 01:07AM PST poll #5
(Love and Semantics) In Vernon God Little, Vern is on the run and out of money. Suddenly, his dream girl shows up with $600! His comment, in his ironic interior monologue:

"One thing to be proud of: I don't respond to the flood of joy-hormones, the ones that make you want to smell flowers, or say I love you. I contain myself like a man."

If Vern had told the girl that he loved her, he wouldn’t have meant anything in particular.

He would have said it without thinking at all, the way you might say “Shit!” if you hit your thumb with a hammer.
 
  1 vote, 100.0%

He would just have said it because he was being polite, the way you might say “Fine, thanks” if someone said “Hello, how are you?”
 
  0 votes, 0.0%

He would have meant something
 
  0 votes, 0.0%


created Feb 18, 2009 01:25AM PST poll #6
(Love and semantics) In the movie Ghost, every time Demi Moore tells Patrick Swayze that she loves him, he replies "Ditto". She clearly finds this very irritating.

What would Patrick Swayze's character have meant if he directly had told Demi Moore's character that he loved her?

He had both tender and sexual feelings for her
 
  2 votes, 100.0%

He some other kind of feelings for her
 
  0 votes, 0.0%

He had tender (“warm and fuzzy”) feelings for her
 
  0 votes, 0.0%

He had sexual feelings for her
 
  0 votes, 0.0%

He would have been saying something about his feelings, but he would have been lying
 
  0 votes, 0.0%

He wouldn’t have been saying anything at all about his feelings
 
  0 votes, 0.0%


created Feb 18, 2009 01:23AM PST poll #7
(Love and Semantics) In the movie Ghost, every time Demi Moore tells Patrick Swayze that she loves him, he replies "Ditto". She clearly finds this very irritating.

If Patrick Swayze's character had directly told Demi Moore's character that he loved her, would he have been promising something or asking for some kind of promise from her?

Yes, he would have been making a promise to her. For example, he would have been promising that her well-being was important to him, and that he would always, or for a long time, care about her.
 
  1 vote, 50.0%

Yes, he would have been promising something more complicated that doesn’t fit any of the above.
 
  1 vote, 50.0%

Yes, he would have been offering a reciprocal arrangement. For example, he promises to care about her if she feels the same way about him, or something like that.
 
  0 votes, 0.0%

As immediately above, but he also wanted her to promise not to make the same offer to anyone else.
 
  0 votes, 0.0%

Yes, he would have been asking for a promise from her. For example, he wanted an assurance from her that his well-being was important to her, and that she would always, or for a long time, care about him.
 
  0 votes, 0.0%

As immediately above, but both sides must promise not to make the same offer to anyone else.
 
  0 votes, 0.0%

As immediately above, and he was also promising not to make the same offer to anyone else.
 
  0 votes, 0.0%

He would have been promising something, but he would have been lying.
 
  0 votes, 0.0%

He wouldn’t have been promising anything or asking for any kind of promise.
 
  0 votes, 0.0%


created Feb 18, 2009 01:22AM PST poll #8
(Love and Semantics) In the movie Ghost, every time Demi Moore tells Patrick Swayze that she loves him, he replies "Ditto". She clearly finds this very irritating.

If Patrick Swayze's character had directly told Demi Moore's character that he loved her, he wouldn’t have meant anything in particular.

He would have meant something
 
  1 vote, 50.0%

He would have said it without thinking at all, the way you might say “Shit!” if you hit your thumb with a hammer.
 
  1 vote, 50.0%

He would just have said it because he was being polite, the way you might say “Fine, thanks” if someone said “Hello, how are you?”
 
  0 votes, 0.0%


created Feb 17, 2009 04:43PM PST poll #9
(Love and semantics) In the movie Splash!, there are several relevant incidents. Near the beginning, Tom Hanks is having a fraught telephone conversation with his girlfriend Victoria. “What do you mean, do I love you?” he asks. He’s clearly been put on the spot. “Well, do you love me? Huh? Huh? Well, there you go then!” But this doesn’t work out well, and shortly afterwards we find she’s left him.

Later, after Hanks has met Daryl Hannah's character, she unexpectedly gives him an enormous fountain as a present. “Why did you do that?” he asks, bemused. “Because I love you,” she answers. Hanks is taken aback by this forthright declaration. “I love… this present!” he stammers, as usual avoiding the fatal words. Then he reconsiders. “I love you, Madison!” He’s surprised he wants to say it.

What did Tom Hanks's character mean when he told Daryl Hannah's character that he loved her?

He had tender (“warm and fuzzy”) feelings for her
 
  1 vote, 33.3%

He had sexual feelings for her
 
  1 vote, 33.3%

He had both tender and sexual feelings for her
 
  1 vote, 33.3%

He some other kind of feelings for her
 
  0 votes, 0.0%

He was saying something about his feelings, but he was lying
 
  0 votes, 0.0%

He wasn’t saying anything at all about his feelings
 
  0 votes, 0.0%


created Feb 17, 2009 04:41PM PST poll #10
(Love and Semantics) In the movie Splash!, there are several relevant incidents. Near the beginning, Tom Hanks is having a fraught telephone conversation with his girlfriend Victoria. “What do you mean, do I love you?” he asks. He’s clearly been put on the spot. “Well, do you love me? Huh? Huh? Well, there you go then!” But this doesn’t work out well, and shortly afterwards we find she’s left him.

Later, after Hanks has met Daryl Hannah, she unexpectedly gives him an enormous fountain as a present. “Why did you do that?” he asks, bemused. “Because I love you,” she answers. Hanks is taken aback by this forthright declaration. “I love… this present!” he stammers, as usual avoiding the fatal words. Then he reconsiders. “I love you, Madison!” He’s surprised he wants to say it.

When Tom Hanks's character told Daryl Hannah's character that he loved her, was he promising something or asking for some kind of promise from her?

Yes, he was making a promise to her. For example, he was promising that her well-being was important to him, and that he would always, or for a long time, care about her.
 
  1 vote, 33.3%

As immediately above, but he also wants her to promise not to make the same offer to anyone else.
 
  1 vote, 33.3%

He wasn’t promising anything or asking for any kind of promise.
 
  1 vote, 33.3%

Yes, he was asking for a promise from her. For example, he wanted an assurance from her that his well-being was important to her, and that she would always, or for a long time, care about him.
 
  0 votes, 0.0%

As immediately above, and he is also promising not to make the same offer to anyone else.
 
  0 votes, 0.0%

As immediately above, but both sides must promise not to make the same offer to anyone else.
 
  0 votes, 0.0%

Yes, he was promising something more complicated that doesn’t fit any of the above.
 
  0 votes, 0.0%

He was promising something, but he was lying.
 
  0 votes, 0.0%

Yes, he was offering a reciprocal arrangement. For example, he promises to care about her if she feels the same way about him, or something like that.
 
  0 votes, 0.0%


created Feb 17, 2009 04:39PM PST poll #11
(Love and Semantics) In the movie Splash!, there are several relevant incidents. Near the beginning, Tom Hanks is having a fraught telephone conversation with his girlfriend Victoria. “What do you mean, do I love you?” he asks. He’s clearly been put on the spot. “Well, do you love me? Huh? Huh? Well, there you go then!” But this doesn’t work out well, and shortly afterwards we find she’s left him.

Later, after Hanks has met Daryl Hannah, she unexpectedly gives him an enormous fountain as a present. “Why did you do that?” he asks, bemused. “Because I love you,” she answers. Hanks is taken aback by this forthright declaration. “I love… this present!” he stammers, as usual avoiding the fatal words. Then he reconsiders. “I love you, Madison!” He’s surprised he wants to say it.

When Tom Hanks's character told Daryl Hannah that he loved her, he didn’t mean anything in particular.

He did mean something.
 
  3 votes, 100.0%

He said it without thinking at all, the way you might say “Shit!” if you hit your thumb with a hammer.
 
  0 votes, 0.0%

He just said it because he was being polite, the way you might say “Fine, thanks” if someone said “Hello, how are you?”
 
  0 votes, 0.0%


created Feb 16, 2009 12:09PM PST poll #12
(Love and semantics) In Manon des Sources, Soubeyran and Ugolin have ruined Jean and his family by secretly blocking up the spring on which their farm depends. After Jean's death, they take it over, unblock the spring, and proceed to make a fortune.

Unfortunately for him, Ugolin falls in love with Manon, Jean's beautiful daughter. He can't think how to approach her, and decides that the best way will be to start by offering her the chance of moving back to her old farm, in exchange for doing a little work. What he doesn't know is that Manon is aware of his duplicity in blocking up the spring. She scornfully rejects his offer - she isn't interested in being his servant. Completely losing his cool, he runs after her, shouting:

Manon! Ne cours pas! Ecoute-moi une minute! Manon, c'est pas vrai! C'est pas pour te faire travailler! C'est parce que je t'aime! Manon, je t'aime! Je t'aime d'amour!

[Manon! Don't run away! Listen to me a minute! Manon, it's not true! It's not to get work out of you! It's because I love you! Manon, I love you! I love you and I am in love with you!:]

Manon stares at him, astonished and disgusted. He continues:

Manon! J'ai pas osé te le dire de près, mais j'en suis malade! Il m'étouffe! Et il y a longtemps que ça m'a pris!...

[Manon! I haven't dared tell you, but it's making me sick! It's strangling me! And I've felt like this for such a long time!...:]

What did Ugolin mean when he told Manon that he loved her?

He had both tender and sexual feelings for her
 
  2 votes, 66.7%

He had sexual feelings for her
 
  1 vote, 33.3%

He some other kind of feelings for her
 
  0 votes, 0.0%

He had tender (“warm and fuzzy”) feelings for her
 
  0 votes, 0.0%

He was saying something about his feelings, but he was lying
 
  0 votes, 0.0%

He wasn’t saying anything at all about his feelings
 
  0 votes, 0.0%


created Feb 16, 2009 12:08PM PST poll #13
(Love and Semantics) In Manon des Sources, Soubeyran and Ugolin have ruined Jean and his family by secretly blocking up the spring on which their farm depends. After Jean's death, they take it over, unblock the spring, and proceed to make a fortune.

Unfortunately for him, Ugolin falls in love with Manon, Jean's beautiful daughter. He can't think how to approach her, and decides that the best way will be to start by offering her the chance of moving back to her old farm, in exchange for doing a little work. What he doesn't know is that Manon is aware of his duplicity in blocking up the spring. She scornfully rejects his offer - she isn't interested in being his servant. Completely losing his cool, he runs after her, shouting:

Manon! Ne cours pas! Ecoute-moi une minute! Manon, c'est pas vrai! C'est pas pour te faire travailler! C'est parce que je t'aime! Manon, je t'aime! Je t'aime d'amour!

[Manon! Don't run away! Listen to me a minute! Manon, it's not true! It's not to get work out of you! It's because I love you! Manon, I love you! I love you and I am in love with you!:]

Manon stares at him, astonished and disgusted. He continues:

Manon! J'ai pas osé te le dire de près, mais j'en suis malade! Il m'étouffe! Et il y a longtemps que ça m'a pris!...

[Manon! I haven't dared tell you, but it's making me sick! It's strangling me! And I've felt like this for such a long time!...:]

When Ugolin told Manon that he loved her, was he promising something or asking for some kind of promise from her?

Yes, he was making a promise to her. For example, he was promising that her well-being was important to him, and that he would always, or for a long time, care about her.
 
  1 vote, 33.3%

As immediately above, and he is also promising not to make the same offer to anyone else.
 
  1 vote, 33.3%

He wasn’t promising anything or asking for any kind of promise.
 
  1 vote, 33.3%

As immediately above, but he also wants her to promise not to make the same offer to anyone else.
 
  0 votes, 0.0%

Yes, he was asking for a promise from her. For example, he wanted an assurance from her that his well-being was important to her, and that she would always, or for a long time, care about him.
 
  0 votes, 0.0%

As immediately above, but both sides must promise not to make the same offer to anyone else.
 
  0 votes, 0.0%

Yes, he was promising something more complicated that doesn’t fit any of the above.
 
  0 votes, 0.0%

He was promising something, but he was lying.
 
  0 votes, 0.0%

Yes, he was offering a reciprocal arrangement. For example, he promises to care about her if she feels the same way about him, or something like that.
 
  0 votes, 0.0%


created Feb 16, 2009 12:06PM PST poll #14
(Love and Semantics) In Manon des Sources, Soubeyran and Ugolin have ruined Jean and his family by secretly blocking up the spring on which their farm depends. After Jean's death, they take it over, unblock the spring, and proceed to make a fortune.

Unfortunately for him, Ugolin falls in love with Manon, Jean's beautiful daughter. He can't think how to approach her, and decides that the best way will be to start by offering her the chance of moving back to her old farm, in exchange for doing a little work. What he doesn't know is that Manon is aware of his duplicity in blocking up the spring. She scornfully rejects his offer - she isn't interested in being his servant. Completely losing his cool, he runs after her, shouting:

Manon! Ne cours pas! Ecoute-moi une minute! Manon, c'est pas vrai! C'est pas pour te faire travailler! C'est parce que je t'aime! Manon, je t'aime! Je t'aime d'amour!

[Manon! Don't run away! Listen to me a minute! Manon, it's not true! It's not to get work out of you! It's because I love you! Manon, I love you! I love you and I am in love with you!:]

Manon stares at him, astonished and disgusted. He continues:

Manon! J'ai pas osé te le dire de près, mais j'en suis malade! Il m'étouffe! Et il y a longtemps que ça m'a pris!...

[Manon! I haven't dared tell you, but it's making me sick! It's strangling me! And I've felt like this for such a long time!...:]

When Ugolin told Manon that he loved her, he didn’t mean anything in particular.

He did mean something
 
  3 votes, 100.0%

He said it without thinking at all, the way you might say “Shit!” if you hit your thumb with a hammer.
 
  0 votes, 0.0%

He just said it because he was being polite, the way you might say “Fine, thanks” if someone said “Hello, how are you?”
 
  0 votes, 0.0%


created Feb 16, 2009 05:02AM PST poll #15
(Love and semantics) Eurhythmics, Ball and Chain

Well the sound of your voice on the telephone
Make me feel distressed
Make me all alone.
Why do I feel so incomplete?
When you're not here I'm just obsolete.

My bed is burnin' all through the night.
You're the only one that can make me feel right.
Try to lay down my sleepin' head
But I'm tossin' and turnin' around instead.

I love you like a ball and chain.
(Make it alright now.)
Love you like a ball and chain.
(Feels too good.)

I'm a fool I know but I'm stuck on you.
I'm a fool I know and it's makin' me blue.
There's a river of blood.
There's a river of tears
I've been wasting all these years.

What did the singer mean when she told the unnamed guy that she loved him?

She had sexual feelings for him
 
  2 votes, 50.0%

She had both tender and sexual feelings for him
 
  2 votes, 50.0%

She some other kind of feelings for him
 
  0 votes, 0.0%

She had tender (“warm and fuzzy”) feelings for him
 
  0 votes, 0.0%

She was saying something about her feelings, but she was lying
 
  0 votes, 0.0%

She wasn’t saying anything at all about her feelings
 
  0 votes, 0.0%


created Feb 16, 2009 05:01AM PST poll #16
(Love and Semantics) Eurhythmics, Ball and Chain

Well the sound of your voice on the telephone
Make me feel distressed
Make me all alone.
Why do I feel so incomplete?
When you're not here I'm just obsolete.

My bed is burnin' all through the night.
You're the only one that can make me feel right.
Try to lay down my sleepin' head
But I'm tossin' and turnin' around instead.

I love you like a ball and chain.
(Make it alright now.)
Love you like a ball and chain.
(Feels too good.)

I'm a fool I know but I'm stuck on you.
I'm a fool I know and it's makin' me blue.
There's a river of blood.
There's a river of tears
I've been wasting all these years.

When the singer told the unnamed guy that she loved him, was she promising something or asking for some kind of promise from him?

She wasn’t promising anything or asking for any kind of promise.
 
  2 votes, 50.0%

Yes, she was offering a reciprocal arrangement. For example, she promises to care about him if he feels the same way about her, or something like that.
 
  1 vote, 25.0%

Yes, she was making a promise to him. For example, she was promising that his well-being was important to her, and that she would always, or for a long time, care about him.
 
  1 vote, 25.0%

As immediately above, but both sides must promise not to make the same offer to anyone else.
 
  0 votes, 0.0%

As immediately above, and she is also promising not to make the same offer to anyone else.
 
  0 votes, 0.0%

As immediately above, but she also wants him to promise not to make the same offer to anyone else.
 
  0 votes, 0.0%

Yes, she was promising something more complicated that doesn’t fit any of the above.
 
  0 votes, 0.0%

She was promising something, but she was lying.
 
  0 votes, 0.0%

Yes, she was asking for a promise from him. For example, she wanted an assurance from him that her well-being was important to him, and that he would always, or for a long time, care about her.
 
  0 votes, 0.0%


created Feb 16, 2009 05:00AM PST poll #17
(Love and Semantics) Eurhythmics, Ball and Chain

Well the sound of your voice on the telephone
Make me feel distressed
Make me all alone.
Why do I feel so incomplete?
When you're not here I'm just obsolete.

My bed is burnin' all through the night.
You're the only one that can make me feel right.
Try to lay down my sleepin' head
But I'm tossin' and turnin' around instead.

I love you like a ball and chain.
(Make it alright now.)
Love you like a ball and chain.
(Feels too good.)

I'm a fool I know but I'm stuck on you.
I'm a fool I know and it's makin' me blue.
There's a river of blood.
There's a river of tears
I've been wasting all these years.

When the singer told the unnamed guy that she loved him, she didn’t mean anything in particular.

She did mean something.
 
  4 votes, 100.0%

She said it without thinking at all, the way you might say “Shit!” if you hit your thumb with a hammer.
 
  0 votes, 0.0%

She just said it because he was being polite, the way you might say “Fine, thanks” if someone said “Hello, how are you?”
 
  0 votes, 0.0%


created Feb 15, 2009 03:22PM PST poll #18
(Love and semantics) In War and Peace, wealthy, hapless Pierre is bewitched by the beautiful, idiotic Helen and her designing family, who conspire to see her married to Pierre (and his immense fortune). Pierre, in response to what seems to be a done deal, is confused about the situation and feels a sense of dread mingled with attraction, but tells himself that "all this had to be so and could not be otherwise.... therefore there's no point in asking whether it's good or bad. It's good because it's definite, and there's no more of the old tormenting doubt." Casting around for something to say to her in the moments when it becomes clear that he is inevitably fated to marry a woman whose physical allure is her only attraction, they have a moment of total awkwardness in the place of intimacy, after she asks that he remove his glasses:

Pierre took off his spectacles, and his eyes, on top of the general strangeness of people's eyes when they take off their spectacles, had a frightened and questioning look. He was about to bend down to her hand and kiss it; but she, with a quick and crude movement of her head, intercepted his lips and brought them together with her own. Her face struck Pierre by its altered, unpleasantly perplexed expression.

"It's too late now, it's all over; and anyway I love her," thought Pierre.


"Je vous aime!" he said, having remembered what needed to be said on these occasions; but the words sounded so meager that he felt ashamed of himself.

A month and a half later he was married and settled down, as they say, the happy possessor of a beautiful wife and millions of roubles, in the big, newly done-over house of the counts Bezukhov in Petersburg"
(2007, p. 214).

Pierre recalls these words -- expressed in the artificial, affected French of high society, rather than his soulful native Russian -- several times throughout the novel, as representing the point at which he bound himself to a life of misery with a cruel, stupid woman.

What did Pierre mean when he told Helen that he loved her?

He wasn’t saying anything at all about his feelings
 
  2 votes, 50.0%

He some other kind of feelings for her
 
  1 vote, 25.0%

He had tender (“warm and fuzzy”) feelings for her
 
  1 vote, 25.0%

He was saying something about his feelings, but he was lying
 
  0 votes, 0.0%

He had sexual feelings for her
 
  0 votes, 0.0%

He had both tender and sexual feelings for her
 
  0 votes, 0.0%


created Feb 15, 2009 03:21PM PST poll #19
(Love and Semantics) In War and Peace, wealthy, hapless Pierre is bewitched by the beautiful, idiotic Helen and her designing family, who conspire to see her married to Pierre (and his immense fortune). Pierre, in response to what seems to be a done deal, is confused about the situation and feels a sense of dread mingled with attraction, but tells himself that "all this had to be so and could not be otherwise.... therefore there's no point in asking whether it's good or bad. It's good because it's definite, and there's no more of the old tormenting doubt." Casting around for something to say to her in the moments when it becomes clear that he is inevitably fated to marry a woman whose physical allure is her only attraction, they have a moment of total awkwardness in the place of intimacy, after she asks that he remove his glasses:

Pierre took off his spectacles, and his eyes, on top of the general strangeness of people's eyes when they take off their spectacles, had a frightened and questioning look. He was about to bend down to her hand and kiss it; but she, with a quick and crude movement of her head, intercepted his lips and brought them together with her own. Her face struck Pierre by its altered, unpleasantly perplexed expression.

"It's too late now, it's all over; and anyway I love her," thought Pierre.


"Je vous aime!" he said, having remembered what needed to be said on these occasions; but the words sounded so meager that he felt ashamed of himself.

A month and a half later he was married and settled down, as they say, the happy possessor of a beautiful wife and millions of roubles, in the big, newly done-over house of the counts Bezukhov in Petersburg"
(2007, p. 214).

Pierre recalls these words -- expressed in the artificial, affected French of high society, rather than his soulful native Russian -- several times throughout the novel, as representing the point at which he bound himself to a life of misery with a cruel, stupid woman.

When Pierre told Helen that he loved her, was he promising something or asking for some kind of promise from her?

Yes, he was making a promise to her. For example, he was promising that her well-being was important to him, and that he would always, or for a long time, care about her.
 
  2 votes, 40.0%

As immediately above, and he is also promising not to make the same offer to anyone else.
 
  2 votes, 40.0%

Yes, he was promising something more complicated that doesn’t fit any of the above.
 
  1 vote, 20.0%

Yes, he was offering a reciprocal arrangement. For example, he promises to care about her if she feels the same way about him, or something like that.
 
  0 votes, 0.0%

As immediately above, but he also wants her to promise not to make the same offer to anyone else.
 
  0 votes, 0.0%

As immediately above, but both sides must promise not to make the same offer to anyone else.
 
  0 votes, 0.0%

Yes, he was asking for a promise from her. For example, he wanted an assurance from her that his well-being was important to her, and that she would always, or for a long time, care about him.
 
  0 votes, 0.0%

He was promising something, but he was lying.
 
  0 votes, 0.0%

He wasn’t promising anything or asking for any kind of promise.
 
  0 votes, 0.0%


created Feb 15, 2009 03:18PM PST poll #20
Love and Semantics) In War and Peace, wealthy, hapless Pierre is bewitched by the beautiful, idiotic Helen and her designing family, who conspire to see her married to Pierre (and his immense fortune). Pierre, in response to what seems to be a done deal, is confused about the situation and feels a sense of dread mingled with attraction, but tells himself that "all this had to be so and could not be otherwise.... therefore there's no point in asking whether it's good or bad. It's good because it's definite, and there's no more of the old tormenting doubt." Casting around for something to say to her in the moments when it becomes clear that he is inevitably fated to marry a woman whose physical allure is her only attraction, they have a moment of total awkwardness in the place of intimacy, after she asks that he remove his glasses:

Pierre took off his spectacles, and his eyes, on top of the general strangeness of people's eyes when they take off their spectacles, had a frightened and questioning look. He was about to bend down to her hand and kiss it; but she, with a quick and crude movement of her head, intercepted his lips and brought them together with her own. Her face struck Pierre by its altered, unpleasantly perplexed expression.

"It's too late now, it's all over; and anyway I love her," thought Pierre.


"Je vous aime!" he said, having remembered what needed to be said on these occasions; but the words sounded so meager that he felt ashamed of himself.

A month and a half later he was married and settled down, as they say, the happy possessor of a beautiful wife and millions of roubles, in the big, newly done-over house of the counts Bezukhov in Petersburg"
(2007, p. 214).

Pierre recalls these words -- expressed in the artificial, affected French of high society, rather than his soulful native Russian -- several times throughout the novel, as representing the point at which he bound himself to a life of misery with a cruel, stupid woman.

When Pierre told Helen that he loved her, he didn’t mean anything in particular.

He did mean something
 
  2 votes, 66.7%

He just said it because he was being polite, the way you might say “Fine, thanks” if someone said “Hello, how are you?”
 
  1 vote, 33.3%

He said it without thinking at all, the way you might say “Shit!” if you hit your thumb with a hammer.
 
  0 votes, 0.0%


created Feb 15, 2009 01:56PM PST poll #21
(Love and semantics) In The Empire Strikes Back, Leia says "I love you" and Han replies: "I know".

According to various sources, Harrison Ford ad-libbed "I know," when the script called for "I love you too"

What would Han have meant if he had told Leia that he loved her?

He had both tender and sexual feelings for her
 
  3 votes, 75.0%

He had tender (“warm and fuzzy”) feelings for her
 
  1 vote, 25.0%

He some other kind of feelings for her
 
  0 votes, 0.0%

He had sexual feelings for her
 
  0 votes, 0.0%

He would have been saying something about his feelings, but he would have been lying
 
  0 votes, 0.0%

He wouldn’t have been saying anything at all about his feelings
 
  0 votes, 0.0%


created Feb 15, 2009 01:53PM PST poll #22
(Love and Semantics) In The Empire Strikes Back, Leia says "I love you" and Han replies: "I know".

According to various sources, Harrison Ford ad-libbed "I know," when the script called for "I love you too"

If Han had told Leia that he loved her, would he have been promising something or asking for some kind of promise from her?

Yes, he would have been making a promise to her. For example, he would have been promising that her well-being was important to him, and that he would always, or for a long time, care about her.
 
  2 votes, 50.0%

As immediately above, but he also wanted her to promise not to make the same offer to anyone else
 
  1 vote, 25.0%

He wouldn’t have been promising anything or asking for any kind of promise.
 
  1 vote, 25.0%

Yes, he would have been asking for a promise from her. For example, he wanted an assurance from her that his well-being was important to her, and that she would always, or for a long time, care about him.
 
  0 votes, 0.0%

As immediately above, and he was also promising not to make the same offer to anyone else.
 
  0 votes, 0.0%

As immediately above, but both sides must promise not to make the same offer to anyone else.
 
  0 votes, 0.0%

Yes, he would have been promising something more complicated that doesn’t fit any of the above.
 
  0 votes, 0.0%

He would have been promising something, but he would have been lying.
 
  0 votes, 0.0%

Yes, he would have been offering a reciprocal arrangement. For example, he promises to care about her if she feels the same way about him, or something like that.
 
  0 votes, 0.0%


created Feb 15, 2009 01:51PM PST poll #23
(Love and Semantics) In The Empire Strikes Back, Leia says "I love you" and Han replies: "I know".

According to various sources, Harrison Ford ad-libbed "I know," when the script called for "I love you too"

If Han had told Leia that he loved her, he wouldn’t have meant anything in particular.

He would have meant something
 
  4 votes, 80.0%

He would just have said it because he was being polite, the way you might say “Fine, thanks” if someone said “Hello, how are you?”
 
  1 vote, 20.0%

He would have said it without thinking at all, the way you might say “Shit!” if you hit your thumb with a hammer.
 
  0 votes, 0.0%


created Feb 15, 2009 07:27AM PST poll #24
(Love and semantics) In Jane Eyre by Charlotte Bronte, Mr Rochester is asking Jane why she looks troubled, and is wondering if she is nervous about their upcoming wedding. She responds:

'I think it is a glorious thing to have the hope of living with you, because I love you. No, sir, don't caress me now - let me talk undisturbed.'

When Jane told Mr Rochester that she loved him, she didn’t mean anything in particular.

She did mean something.
 
  5 votes, 71.4%

She said it without thinking at all, the way you might say “Shit!” if you hit your thumb with a hammer
 
  1 vote, 14.3%

She just said it because she was being polite, the way you might say “Fine, thanks” if someone said “Hello, how are you?”
 
  1 vote, 14.3%


created Feb 15, 2009 07:24AM PST poll #25
(Love and semantics) In Jane Eyre by Charlotte Bronte, Mr Rochester is asking Jane why she looks troubled, and is wondering if she is nervous about their upcoming wedding. She responds:

'I think it is a glorious thing to have the hope of living with you, because I love you. No, sir, don't caress me now - let me talk undisturbed.'

When Jane told Mr Rochester that she loved him, was she promising something or asking for some kind of promise from him?

Yes, she was promising something more complicated that doesn’t fit any of the above.
 
  3 votes, 42.9%

She wasn’t promising anything or asking for any kind of promise.
 
  2 votes, 28.6%

As immediately above, but both sides must promise not to make the same offer to anyone else.
 
  1 vote, 14.3%

Yes, she was making a promise to him. For example, she was promising that his well-being was important to her, and that she would always, or for a long time, care about him.
 
  1 vote, 14.3%

As immediately above, but she also wants him to promise not to make the same offer to anyone else
 
  0 votes, 0.0%

Yes, she was asking for a promise from him. For example, she wanted an assurance from him that her well-being was important to him, and that he would always, or for a long time, care about her.
 
  0 votes, 0.0%

As immediately above, and she is also promising not to make the same offer to anyone else.
 
  0 votes, 0.0%

She was promising something, but she was lying.
 
  0 votes, 0.0%

Yes, she was offering a reciprocal arrangement. For example, she promises to care about him if he feels the same way about her, or something like that.
 
  0 votes, 0.0%


created Feb 15, 2009 07:19AM PST poll #26
(Love and semantics) In Jane Eyre by Charlotte Bronte, Mr Rochester is asking Jane why she looks troubled, and is wondering if she is nervous about their upcoming wedding. She responds:

'I think it is a glorious thing to have the hope of living with you, because I love you. No, sir, don't caress me now - let me talk undisturbed.'

What did Jane mean when he told Mr Rochester that she loved him?

She had both tender and sexual feelings for him
 
  4 votes, 57.1%

She had tender (“warm and fuzzy”) feelings for him
 
  3 votes, 42.9%

She had some other kind of feelings for him
 
  0 votes, 0.0%

She had sexual feelings for him
 
  0 votes, 0.0%

She was saying something about her feelings, but she was lying
 
  0 votes, 0.0%

She wasn’t saying anything at all about her feeling
 
  0 votes, 0.0%


created Feb 14, 2009 04:42PM PST poll #27
(Love and Semantics) In the movie Sideways, Sandra Oh becomes very upset when she discovers that her lover, Thomas Hadden Church, is engaged to be married to someone else. The film presents abundant evidence that Church's and Oh’s characters have passionate feelings for each other. None the less, Oh shouts "You said you loved me!" and breaks Church’s nose with her motorcycle helmet.

When Church’s character told Oh’s character that he loved her, he didn’t mean anything in particular.

He did mean something
 
  4 votes, 100.0%

He said it without thinking at all, the way you might say “Shit!” if you hit your thumb with a hammer.
 
  0 votes, 0.0%

He just said it because he was being polite, the way you might say “Fine, thanks” if someone said “Hello, how are you?”
 
  0 votes, 0.0%


created Feb 14, 2009 04:40PM PST poll #28
(Love and Semantics) In the movie Sideways, Sandra Oh becomes very upset when she discovers that her lover, Thomas Hadden Church, is engaged to be married to someone else. The film presents abundant evidence that Church's and Oh’s characters have passionate feelings for each other. None the less, Oh shouts "You said you loved me!" and breaks Church’s nose with her motorcycle helmet.

When Church’s character told Oh’s character that he loved her, was he promising something or asking for some kind of promise from her?

He was promising something, but he was lying.
 
  2 votes, 50.0%

He wasn’t promising anything or asking for any kind of promise.
 
  1 vote, 25.0%

Yes, he was offering a reciprocal arrangement. For example, he promises to care about her if she feels the same way about him, or something like that.
 
  1 vote, 25.0%

As immediately above, but he also wants her to promise not to make the same offer to anyone else.
 
  0 votes, 0.0%

Yes, he was asking for a promise from her. For example, he wanted an assurance from her that his well-being was important to her, and that she would always, or for a long time, care about him.
 
  0 votes, 0.0%

As immediately above, but both sides must promise not to make the same offer to anyone else.
 
  0 votes, 0.0%

Yes, he was promising something more complicated that doesn’t fit any of the above.
 
  0 votes, 0.0%

As immediately above, and he is also promising not to make the same offer to anyone else.
 
  0 votes, 0.0%

Yes, he was making a promise to her. For example, he was promising that her well-being was important to him, and that he would always, or for a long time, care about her.
 
  0 votes, 0.0%


created Feb 14, 2009 04:35PM PST poll #29
(Love and semantics) In the movie Sideways, Sandra Oh becomes very upset when she discovers that her lover, Thomas Hadden Church, is engaged to be married to someone else. The film presents abundant evidence that Church's and Oh’s characters have passionate feelings for each other. None the less, Oh shouts "You said you loved me!" and breaks Church’s nose with her motorcycle helmet.

What did Church’s character mean when he told Oh’s character that he loved her?

He had both tender and sexual feelings for her
 
  2 votes, 50.0%

He was saying something about his feelings, but he was lying
 
  1 vote, 25.0%

He had sexual feelings for her
 
  1 vote, 25.0%

He some other kind of feelings for her
 
  0 votes, 0.0%

He had tender (“warm and fuzzy”) feelings for her
 
  0 votes, 0.0%

He wasn’t saying anything at all about his feelings
 
  0 votes, 0.0%


created Feb 01, 2009 12:54PM PST poll #30
Why haven't you contributed an example of someone saying "I love you" to the Love and Semantics thread?

Huh?
 
  13 votes, 56.5%

I've already done that. Quit bugging me.
 
  7 votes, 30.4%

I can't remember a single such scene. In fact I can't remember anything I read or watch. Too much substance abuse. Sorry.
 
  2 votes, 8.7%

Sounds like too much work. I'd have find the thread and type some stuff and I don't know what. Could easily take three minutes.
 
  1 vote, 4.3%

OMG. Way too embarrassing.
 
  0 votes, 0.0%

I just got this from the Haters Group. Enough already!
 
  0 votes, 0.0%


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