Measure What Matters: How Google, Bono, and the Gates Foundation Rock the World with OKRs
Rate it:
Open Preview
4%
Flag icon
For anyone striving for high performance in the workplace, goals are very necessary things.
5%
Flag icon
Less than a third of U.S. workers are “involved in, enthusiastic about and committed to their work and workplace.”
6%
Flag icon
This book—with its companion website, whatmatters.com—is
8%
Flag icon
The objective is the direction:
9%
Flag icon
subordinates be consulted on company goals. Instead of traditional crisis management, he proposed a balance of long- and short-range planning, informed by data and enriched by regular conversations among colleagues.
15%
Flag icon
(Wrong decisions can be corrected once results begin to roll in. Nondecisions—or hastily abandoned ones—teach us nothing.)
15%
Flag icon
For organization-level OKRs, the buck stops with senior leadership. They must personally commit to the process.
17%
Flag icon
To safeguard quality while pushing for quantitative deliverables, one solution is to pair key results—to measure “both effect and counter-effect,” as Grove wrote in High Output Management.
17%
Flag icon
A few goal-setting ground rules: Key results should be succinct, specific, and measurable. A mix of outputs and inputs is helpful. Finally, completion of all key results must result in attainment of the objective. If not, it’s not an OKR.
21%
Flag icon
At a fast-growing start-up, effective leaders keep firing themselves from jobs they did at the beginning.