The Culture Code: The Secrets of Highly Successful Groups
Rate it:
Open Preview
3%
Flag icon
We focus on what we can see—individual skills. But individual skills are not what matters. What matters is the interaction.
3%
Flag icon
(A strong culture increases net income 756 percent over eleven years, according to a Harvard study of more than two hundred companies.)
4%
Flag icon
Skill 1—Build Safety—explores how signals of connection generate bonds of belonging and identity. Skill 2—Share Vulnerability—explains how habits of mutual risk drive trusting cooperation. Skill 3—Establish Purpose—tells how narratives create shared goals and values.
5%
Flag icon
Jonathan’s group succeeds not because its members are smarter but because they are safer.
7%
Flag icon
Belonging cues possess three basic qualities: 1. Energy: They invest in the exchange that is occurring 2. Individualization: They treat the person as unique and valued 3. Future orientation: They signal the relationship will continue
8%
Flag icon
“Individuals aren’t really individuals. They’re more like musicians in a jazz quartet, forming a web of unconscious actions and reactions to complement the others in the group.
24%
Flag icon
I’m giving you these comments because I have very high expectations and I know that you can reach them.
30%
Flag icon
“If you can see the other person or even the area where they work, you’re reminded of them, and that brings a whole bunch of effects.”
35%
Flag icon
What do you like most about the Benfold? 2. What do you like least? 3. What would you change if you were captain? Whenever Abrashoff received a suggestion he felt was immediately implementable, he announced the change over the ship’s intercom, giving credit to the idea’s originator.
38%
Flag icon
the odds of losing hydraulics and backups had been calculated at one in a billion.
43%
Flag icon
Vulnerability doesn’t come after trust—it precedes it.
56%
Flag icon
“Rank switched off, humility switched on. You’re looking for that moment where people can say, ‘I screwed that up.’
63%
Flag icon
while questions comprise only 6 percent of verbal interactions, they generate 60 percent of ensuing discussions.
63%
Flag icon
I screwed that up are the most important words any leader can say.
63%
Flag icon
Laszlo Bock, former head of People Analytics at Google, recommends that leaders ask their people three questions: • What is one thing that I currently do that you’d like me to continue to do? • What is one thing that I don’t currently do frequently enough that you think I should do more often? • What can I do to make you more effective?
64%
Flag icon
Maddon keeps a glass bowl filled with slips of paper, each inscribed with the name of an expensive wine. When a player violates a team rule, Maddon asks them to draw a slip of paper out of the bowl, purchase that wine, and uncork it with their manager. In other words, Maddon links the act of discipline to the act of reconnection.
65%
Flag icon
“One of the things I say most often is probably the simplest thing I say,” says Givechi. “ ‘Say more about that.’ ”
71%
Flag icon
Stories are not just stories; they are the best invention ever created for delivering mental models that drive behavior.
80%
Flag icon
Be aware of your emotional wake
82%
Flag icon
We are all paid to solve problems. Make sure to pick fun people to solve problems with.
85%
Flag icon
a suggestion from a powerful person tends to be followed. One of his frequently used phrases is “Now it’s up to you.”
99%
Flag icon
Recommended Reading Laszlo Bock, Work Rules (New York: Grand Central Publishing, 2015) David Brooks, The Social Animal (New York: Random House, 2011) Arie de Geus, The Living Company (Boston, MA: Harvard Business Review Press, 2002) Angela Duckworth, Grit: The Power of Perseverance and Passion (New York: Scribner, 2016) Charles Duhigg, The Power of Habit: Why We Do What We Do in Life and Business (New York: Random House, 2012) Amy Edmondson, Teaming: How Organizations Learn, Innovate, and Compete in the Knowledge Economy (San Francisco: Jossey-Bass Pfeiffer, 2012) Adam Grant, Give and Take ...more
This highlight has been truncated due to consecutive passage length restrictions.