Mind Gym
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Read between June 14 - June 24, 2018
8%
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The mind can concentrate on only one thing at a time. So, rather than suppress what you don’t want to happen, you must focus on what you do want to happen or on some neutral thought.
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Herbert Benson, a Harvard cardiologist, found that having patients focus on their breathing and repeating the word “one” lowered their blood pressure and heart rate.
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I give athletes I work with a three-by-five card. On one side I have them list their personal keys to success; on the other, their performance keys to success.
14%
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The probability of achieving the outcome you want increases when you let go of the need to have it.
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Everything gets interpreted. Pressure is in the brain of the beholder. Learn to view pressure as a challenge to meet rather than a threat of defeat.
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I tell tennis players they can expect two or three bad calls in every match, sometimes more. How they manage their emotions can determine whether they win or lose.
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How you choose to look at an event is going to affect how you feel and how you perform.
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kaizen which means constant daily learning and improvement.
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An exercise I teach is called A.C.T. backward. I want you to try it. The A stands for accept your present state. Understand your strengths and weaknesses, as we discussed in the last section. C stands for create your desired state. Dwight Smith had a dream. What’s your dream? Close your eyes, and see yourself exactly the way you want to be. Write down what this desired state would look like. T stands for take action steps to get you there.
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“Goals must be high enough to excite you, yet not so high that you cannot vividly imagine them. Goals must be attainable, but just out of reach for now.”
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Drink the first, sip the second, and refuse the third.
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Fear of failure prevents more of us from succeeding than any opponent.
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Failing to learn is learning to fail.
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Limits begin where vision ends. You have to see yourself as a no-limits person.
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Football coach Lou Holtz said, “If you don’t make a total commitment to whatever you are doing, then you start looking to bail out the first time the boat starts leaking.”
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It is said that 10 percent of life is what happens to us and 90 percent is how we choose to react to it.
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When you’re riding the pines, make a list of things you can do.
51%
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“To be a great champion you must believe you are the best. If you’re not, pretend you are.”
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before you can control your performance you need to be in control of yourself.
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Ask yourself this: It’s game time. Do you know where your mind is?
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“When you find yourself in a hole, the first rule is to stop digging.”
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Sometimes the best form of action is inaction.
70%
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When an athlete’s eyes start to wander so will his mind. Darting eyes are usually not fixed on the task at hand.
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One exercise you may find helpful is to pick up an object—a tennis ball, a golf ball, a baseball, or a glove. Hold it; look at it; study it; contemplate it. When your thoughts begin to wander, return your full attention to the object. The exercise will improve your ability to focus and help increase awareness of where your mind goes.
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it’s better to be decisive than right.
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a person who doubts himself is like a man who would enlist in the ranks of his enemies and bear arms against himself.
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You must be 100 percent committed to each action. If there are doubts in your mind, your muscles won’t know what to do. Let your routines switch you from the thinking mode to the trusting mode.
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“Whatever your job, consistency is the hallmark,” said Joe Torre, manager of the world champion New York Yankees.
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The trick, Arnold Palmer said, “is to stay serene inside even when things are going badly outside.”
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The quality of a person’s life is in direct proportion to their commitment to excellence, regardless of their chosen field. —VINCE LOMBARDI