Books That Quote or Reference Other Works In The Title

Many authors are inspired by other works of literature. Sometimes, they use phrases from the original work in their very title. This is a list of works which quote other (usually canonical) works in their title. If you can, write a note/comment telling where the quote is from.
1

by
3.99 avg rating — 1,482,231 ratings
Rate this book
Clear rating
2

by
3.93 avg rating — 104,621 ratings
Rate this book
Clear rating
3

by
3.86 avg rating — 160,499 ratings
Rate this book
Clear rating
4

by
4.38 avg rating — 438,050 ratings
Rate this book
Clear rating
5

by
3.88 avg rating — 1,993,991 ratings
Rate this book
Clear rating
6

by
4.06 avg rating — 80,241 ratings
Rate this book
Clear rating
7

by
4.30 avg rating — 1,092,038 ratings
Rate this book
Clear rating
8

by
3.97 avg rating — 253,172 ratings
Rate this book
Clear rating
9

by
3.81 avg rating — 116,532 ratings
Rate this book
Clear rating
10

by
3.94 avg rating — 132,155 ratings
Rate this book
Clear rating
11

by
3.91 avg rating — 23,249 ratings
Rate this book
Clear rating
12

by
3.97 avg rating — 766,815 ratings
Rate this book
Clear rating
13

by
3.79 avg rating — 120,204 ratings
Rate this book
Clear rating
14

by
3.93 avg rating — 34,569 ratings
Rate this book
Clear rating
15

by
3.81 avg rating — 268,326 ratings
Rate this book
Clear rating
16

by
really liked it 4.00 avg rating — 38,932 ratings
Rate this book
Clear rating
17

by
3.69 avg rating — 297,135 ratings
Rate this book
Clear rating
18

by
3.92 avg rating — 279,575 ratings
Rate this book
Clear rating
19

by
3.97 avg rating — 39,259 ratings
Rate this book
Clear rating
20

by
4.24 avg rating — 423,967 ratings
Rate this book
Clear rating
21

by
3.90 avg rating — 42,740 ratings
Rate this book
Clear rating
22

by
4.38 avg rating — 1,184,986 ratings
Rate this book
Clear rating
23

by
4.07 avg rating — 546,710 ratings
Rate this book
Clear rating
24

by
3.67 avg rating — 11,106 ratings
Rate this book
Clear rating
25

by
4.06 avg rating — 59,740 ratings
Rate this book
Clear rating
26

by
3.58 avg rating — 193,352 ratings
Rate this book
Clear rating
27

by
3.83 avg rating — 11,228 ratings
Rate this book
Clear rating
28

by
3.77 avg rating — 6,042 ratings
Rate this book
Clear rating
29

by
4.20 avg rating — 3,687,010 ratings
Rate this book
Clear rating
30

by
3.94 avg rating — 86,508 ratings
Rate this book
Clear rating
31

by
3.94 avg rating — 9,123 ratings
Rate this book
Clear rating
32

by
4.07 avg rating — 226,886 ratings
Rate this book
Clear rating
33

by
4.10 avg rating — 45,015 ratings
Rate this book
Clear rating
34

by
3.99 avg rating — 20,019 ratings
Rate this book
Clear rating
35

by
4.06 avg rating — 85,687 ratings
Rate this book
Clear rating
36

by
3.79 avg rating — 1,090 ratings
Rate this book
Clear rating
36

by
4.25 avg rating — 148,043 ratings
Rate this book
Clear rating
38

by
3.98 avg rating — 24,081 ratings
Rate this book
Clear rating
39

by
3.98 avg rating — 46 ratings
Rate this book
Clear rating
40

by
3.90 avg rating — 1,969 ratings
Rate this book
Clear rating
41

by
4.11 avg rating — 53,675 ratings
Rate this book
Clear rating
42

by
3.99 avg rating — 1,389 ratings
Rate this book
Clear rating
43

by
3.72 avg rating — 139,340 ratings
Rate this book
Clear rating
44

by
3.80 avg rating — 6,402 ratings
Rate this book
Clear rating
45

by
4.23 avg rating — 23,994 ratings
Rate this book
Clear rating
46

by
4.19 avg rating — 38,890 ratings
Rate this book
Clear rating
47

by
4.11 avg rating — 154,182 ratings
Rate this book
Clear rating
48

by
4.03 avg rating — 1,870 ratings
Rate this book
Clear rating
49

by
3.38 avg rating — 1,735 ratings
Rate this book
Clear rating
50

by
3.88 avg rating — 65 ratings
Rate this book
Clear rating
51

by
3.95 avg rating — 11,566 ratings
Rate this book
Clear rating
52

by
3.88 avg rating — 2,735 ratings
Rate this book
Clear rating
53

by
4.08 avg rating — 8,261 ratings
Rate this book
Clear rating
54

by
3.91 avg rating — 3,770 ratings
Rate this book
Clear rating
55

by
4.05 avg rating — 40,905 ratings
Rate this book
Clear rating
56

by
3.86 avg rating — 76,199 ratings
Rate this book
Clear rating
57

by
3.88 avg rating — 235,778 ratings
Rate this book
Clear rating
58

by
4.16 avg rating — 32,385 ratings
Rate this book
Clear rating
59

by
3.90 avg rating — 11,711 ratings
Rate this book
Clear rating
60

by
4.09 avg rating — 54,129 ratings
Rate this book
Clear rating
61

by
4.12 avg rating — 10,556 ratings
Rate this book
Clear rating
61

by
3.86 avg rating — 39,389 ratings
Rate this book
Clear rating
63

by
3.90 avg rating — 20,902 ratings
Rate this book
Clear rating
64

by
3.85 avg rating — 3,162 ratings
Rate this book
Clear rating
65

by
3.81 avg rating — 456 ratings
Rate this book
Clear rating
66

by
4.05 avg rating — 52,961 ratings
Rate this book
Clear rating
67

by
3.96 avg rating — 20,364 ratings
Rate this book
Clear rating
68

by
3.76 avg rating — 17,104 ratings
Rate this book
Clear rating
69

by
3.87 avg rating — 6,894 ratings
Rate this book
Clear rating
70

by
3.97 avg rating — 376 ratings
Rate this book
Clear rating
71

by
4.09 avg rating — 16,281 ratings
Rate this book
Clear rating
72

by
3.90 avg rating — 26,499 ratings
Rate this book
Clear rating
73

by
3.69 avg rating — 3,573 ratings
Rate this book
Clear rating
74

by
4.25 avg rating — 18,281 ratings
Rate this book
Clear rating
75

by
4.28 avg rating — 76,207 ratings
Rate this book
Clear rating
76

by
3.92 avg rating — 1,303 ratings
Rate this book
Clear rating
76

by
4.26 avg rating — 868,916 ratings
Rate this book
Clear rating
78

by
3.43 avg rating — 75 ratings
Rate this book
Clear rating
79

by
3.77 avg rating — 16,635 ratings
Rate this book
Clear rating
80

by
3.93 avg rating — 24,524 ratings
Rate this book
Clear rating
81

by
3.46 avg rating — 304 ratings
Rate this book
Clear rating
82

by
3.89 avg rating — 2,444 ratings
Rate this book
Clear rating
83

by
3.75 avg rating — 1,332 ratings
Rate this book
Clear rating
83

by
3.99 avg rating — 3,550 ratings
Rate this book
Clear rating
85

by
3.72 avg rating — 302 ratings
Rate this book
Clear rating
86

by
4.32 avg rating — 22 ratings
Rate this book
Clear rating
87

by
3.72 avg rating — 1,276 ratings
Rate this book
Clear rating
88

by
3.98 avg rating — 5,127 ratings
Rate this book
Clear rating
89

by
3.57 avg rating — 21 ratings
Rate this book
Clear rating
90

by
3.96 avg rating — 5,222 ratings
Rate this book
Clear rating
91

by
3.92 avg rating — 109,966 ratings
Rate this book
Clear rating
92

by
3.96 avg rating — 67,550 ratings
Rate this book
Clear rating
93

by
3.75 avg rating — 103 ratings
Rate this book
Clear rating
94

by
3.87 avg rating — 3,083 ratings
Rate this book
Clear rating
95

by
4.08 avg rating — 33,663 ratings
Rate this book
Clear rating
96

by
3.66 avg rating — 35 ratings
Rate this book
Clear rating
96

by
4.07 avg rating — 40,177 ratings
Rate this book
Clear rating
98

by
3.61 avg rating — 122,253 ratings
Rate this book
Clear rating
99

by
4.04 avg rating — 4,704 ratings
Rate this book
Clear rating
100

by
3.94 avg rating — 1,304 ratings
Rate this book
Clear rating
flag this list (?)
282 books · 75 voters · list created November 7th, 2009 by Ruby (votes) .
22 likes · 
Lists are re-scored approximately every 5 minutes.


Ruby 2405 books
51 friends
Themis-Athena (Lioness at Large) 545 books
367 friends
Harriet 1555 books
65 friends
Thom 6023 books
305 friends
Susanna - Censored by GoodReads 3245 books
861 friends
Nova 1689 books
15 friends
Phillip 4741 books
134 friends
Sandy 2128 books
122 friends

More voters…


Comments Showing 1-48 of 48 (48 new)

dateDown arrow    newest »

message 1: by Thom (new)

Thom Dunn Have heard that over 500 titles have been taken from Hamlet alone.....and that was as of 1960 !


message 3: by Ruby (new)

Ruby Wow! This is wonderful! I always felt that one could gain so much more nuance from a text if one picks up on these things! :-)


message 4: by Themis-Athena (Lioness at Large) (last edited Nov 07, 2009 11:44AM) (new)

Themis-Athena (Lioness at Large) It's a great idea for a list!!


message 5: by Lobstergirl (new)

Lobstergirl I added a comment to one of my votes ("A Great Deliverance" is from the Bible) but now I can't get it to reappear.

The source of C.S. Lewis's That Hideous Strength:

"The title is taken from a poem written by David Lyndsay in 1555, Ane Dialog betuix Experience and ane Courteour, also known as The Monarche. The couplet in question, The shadow of that hyddeous strength, sax myle and more it is of length, refers to the Tower of Babel."


message 6: by Lobstergirl (new)

Lobstergirl "Antic Hay" is from the opening speech in Christopher Marlowe's Edward II.

"Afer Many a Summer Dies the Swan" is from Tennyson's poem Tithonus.

"Eyeless in Gaza" is from Milton's Samson Agonistes.


message 7: by Thom (new)

Thom Dunn LOUSY SEARCH ENGINE( A bitch pitch): Found a title "Once more unto the breech" by Horowitz, but "no book found" when tried to put it on this list.


Themis-Athena (Lioness at Large) Thom, try to enter "0765802740" (the book's ISBN-10 number). That should bring it up. (I can't do it myself because I already exhausted my 100 permitted entries.)


message 9: by Thom (new)

Thom Dunn Themis-Athena wrote: "Thom, try to enter "0765802740" (the book's ISBN-10 number). That should bring it up. (I can't do it myself because I already exhausted my 100 permitted entries.)"

Many thanks, Themis--It worked just as you said it would.


message 11: by Mir (new)

Mir I tried writing the sources in where it lets you comment, but they seem to shift around when new items are added, thus becoming incorrect.


message 12: by Lobstergirl (new)

Lobstergirl Stephen Fry - The Stars' Tennis Balls is from "The Duchess of Malfi:" "We are merely the stars' tennis balls, struck and banded which way please them."


message 13: by Thom (new)

Thom Dunn Lobstergirl wrote: "Stephen Fry - The Stars' Tennis Balls is from "The Duchess of Malfi:" "We are merely the stars' tennis balls, struck and banded which way please them.""

Echoes Gloucester's speech "As flies to wanton boys are we to the gods..."


message 14: by Lobstergirl (new)

Lobstergirl The Longest Journey references Shelley's poem Epipsychidion:

I never was attached to that great sect,
Whose doctrine is, that each one should select
Out of the crowd a mistress or a friend,
And all the rest, though fair and wise, commend
To cold oblivion, though it is in the code
Of modern morals, and the beaten road
Which those poor slaves with weary footsteps tread,
Who travel to their home among the dead
By the broad highway of the world, and so
With one chained friend, perhaps a jealous foe,
The dreariest and the longest journey go.



message 15: by Lobstergirl (new)

Lobstergirl The title of Truman Capote's unfinished novel Answered Prayers comes from the St. Teresa of Avila quote: "More tears are shed over answered prayers than unanswered ones."


message 16: by Thom (new)

Thom Dunn Lobstergirl wrote: "The title of Truman Capote's unfinished novel Answered Prayers comes from the St. Teresa of Avila quote: "More tears are shed over answered prayers than unanswered ones.""

brilliant


message 17: by Lobstergirl (last edited Aug 31, 2012 04:32PM) (new)

Lobstergirl Unacknowledged Legislation: Writers in the Public Sphere

The title is drawn from Percy Bysshe Shelley's quote: "Poets are the hierophants of an unapprehended inspiration; the mirrors of the gigantic shadows which futurity casts upon the present; the words which express what they understand not; the trumpets which sing to battle, and feel not what they inspire; the influence which is moved not, but moves. Poets are the unacknowledged legislators of the world."


message 18: by Lobstergirl (new)

Lobstergirl The Stranger's Child by Alan Hollinghurst. Title comes from the Tennyson poem "In Memoriam":

Till from the garden and the wild
A fresh association blow,
And year by year the landscape grow
Familiar to the stranger’s child;


http://www.theotherpages.org/poems/bo...


message 19: by Lobstergirl (new)

Lobstergirl Anglo-Saxon Attitudes takes its title from Through the Looking-Glass, and What Alice Found There:

All this was lost on Alice, who was still looking intently along the road, shading her eyes with one hand. "I see somebody now!" she exclaimed at last. "But he's coming very slowly--and what curious attitudes he goes into!" (For the Messenger kept skipping up and down, and wriggling like an eel, as he came along, with his great hands spread out like fans on each side.)

"Not at all," said the King. "He's an Anglo-Saxon Messenger--and those are Anglo-Saxon attitudes."



message 20: by Thom (new)

Thom Dunn Lobstergirl wrote: "Anglo-Saxon Attitudes takes its title from Through the Looking-Glass, and What Alice Found There:

All this was lost on Alice, who was still looking intently along the road, shading her eyes with o..."


Brilliant.


message 21: by Lobstergirl (new)

Lobstergirl I found out today that "while Evelyn Waugh ostensibly borrowed his title A Handful of Dust from The Waste Land, Eliot himself lifted the line from John Donne...: "What's become of man's great extend and proportion, when himselfe shrinkes himselfe, and consumes himselfe to a handfull of dust?" ("Devotions Upon Emergent Occasions," Meditation IV.)


message 22: by Thom (new)

Thom Dunn Lobstergirl wrote: "I found out today that "while Evelyn Waugh ostensibly borrowed his title A Handful of Dust from The Waste Land, Eliot himself lifted the line from John Donne...: "What's become of man's great exten..."

Well done you ! Reminds of Styron, "Set This House on Fire", another metaphysical conceit from John Donne, IMS.


message 23: by Misfit (new)

Misfit How does #5 on this list qualify?

Isn't It Pretty To Think So?


message 24: by Lobstergirl (new)

Lobstergirl Misfit wrote: "How does #5 on this list qualify?

Isn't It Pretty To Think So?"


It doesn't. Deleted. Someone has been spamming that book onto every possible list.


Susanna - Censored by GoodReads I left it on this one, much as it stuck in my craw to do so, because "Isn't it pretty to think so?" is a quote from The Sun Also Rises.


message 26: by Misfit (new)

Misfit Thank you.


message 27: by Lobstergirl (new)

Lobstergirl Susanna wrote: "I left it on this one, much as it stuck in my craw to do so, because "Isn't it pretty to think so?" is a quote from The Sun Also Rises."

Well in that case, the author's factotum will have to come back with his 13 sockpuppets to vote it back on.


Susanna - Censored by GoodReads Oh, I'm sure they will.


message 29: by Lobstergirl (new)

Lobstergirl


message 30: by Thom (last edited Jul 09, 2013 06:54PM) (new)

Thom Dunn "Isn't it pretty to think so" is among the most famous of Last Lines", my Modern American Lit prof. said "pretty" is important because it is "the wrong word"..... Anyone see how ?


message 31: by Lobstergirl (new)

Lobstergirl Not me....I've never read it.


message 32: by Thom (new)

Thom Dunn Lobstergirl wrote: "Not me....I've never read it."

Good time capsule. And then, there's Hemingway's prose.


Susanna - Censored by GoodReads The best Hemingway novel, in my opinion.


message 34: by Thom (new)

Thom Dunn Susanna wrote: "The best Hemingway novel, in my opinion."

I vote for The Old Man and the Sea.


Susanna - Censored by GoodReads Yech. (Worst novel, in my opinion.)


message 36: by Thom (new)

Thom Dunn Chacun a son gout.


message 38: by Lobstergirl (new)

Lobstergirl The Wench Is Dead

comes from Christopher Marlowe's "The Jew of Malta."

Thou has committed -
Fornication; but that was in another country,
And besides, the wench is dead.



message 39: by Lobstergirl (new)

Lobstergirl The Way Through The Woods by Colin Dexter

Took his title from Rudyard Kipling's poem of the same title.


message 40: by Lobstergirl (new)

Lobstergirl Let the Great World Spin is taken from Alfred Tennyson's poem Locksley Hall:

Not in vain the distance beacons. Forward, forward let us range,
Let the great world spin for ever down the ringing grooves of change.



message 41: by Lobstergirl (new)

Lobstergirl On Such a Full Sea is taken from Julius Caesar by William Shakespeare. Brutus says:

There is a tide in the affairs of men,
Which, taken at the flood, leads on to fortune;
Omitted, all the voyage of their life
Is bound in shallows and in miseries.
On such a full sea are we now afloat,
And we must take the current when it serves
Or lose our ventures.



message 42: by Lobstergirl (new)

Lobstergirl Set This House On Fire is taken from John Donne, "To the Earle of Carlile, and his Company, at Sion."

Brief excerpt:

"...by his Word, his mercies, hath applied his judgments, and shaked the house, this body, with agues and palsies, and set this house on fire, with fevers and calentures, and frighted the Master of the house, my soule, with horrors..."


message 43: by Lobstergirl (new)

Lobstergirl I added When Even Angels Wept: The Senator Joseph McCarthy Affair--A Story Without a Hero.

The title's reference is from Measure for Measure:

Than the soft myrtle: but man, proud man,
Drest in a little brief authority,
Most ignorant of what he's most assured,
His glassy essence, like an angry ape,
Plays such fantastic tricks before high heaven
As make the angels weep; who, with our spleens,
Would all themselves laugh mortal.



message 44: by Lobstergirl (new)

Lobstergirl Mr. Standfast by John Buchan references the character from Pilgrim's Progress.


message 45: by Lobstergirl (new)

Lobstergirl From a View to a Death by Anthony Powell:

Yes I ken John Peel and Ruby too
Ranter and Royal and Bellman as true,
From the drag to the chase, from the chase to the view
From a view to the death in the morning


by John Peel.


message 46: by Lobstergirl (new)

Lobstergirl The Proud Tower: A Portrait of the World Before the War, 1890-1914 by Barbara Tuchman:

From the poem "The City in the Sea" by E. A. Poe:

Resignedly beneath the sky
The melancholy waters lie.
So blend the turrets and shadows there
That all seem pendulous in air,
While from a proud tower in the town
Death looks gigantically down.



message 47: by Lobstergirl (new)

Lobstergirl This Side of Paradise by F. Scott Fitzgerald:

From the poem "Tiare Tahiti" by Rupert Brooke:

Dive and double and follow after,
Snare in flowers, and kiss, and call,
With lips that fade, and human laughter
And faces individual,
Well this side of Paradise! ....
There’s little comfort in the wise.



message 48: by Lobstergirl (new)

Lobstergirl Frequent Hearses by Edmund Crispin:

From the poem "Elegy to the Memory of an Unfortunate Lady" by Alexander Pope:

On all the line a sudden vengeance waits,
And frequent hearses shall besiege your gates.



back to top



Related News

Thirty-four years after the publication of her dystopian classic, The Handmaid's Tale, Atwood returns to continue the story of Offred. We talked...

Anyone can add books to this list.