Romanticism

Not to be confused with Romance

Romanticism was a complex artistic, literary, and intellectual movement that originated in the second half of the eighteenth century in Western Europe, and gained strength during and after the Industrial and French Revolutions. It was partly a revolt against the political norms of the Age of Enlightenment which rationalised nature, and was embodied most strongly in the visual arts, music, and literature. Romanticism has been seen as "the revival of the life and thought of the Middle Ages", reaching beyond rational and Classicist models to elevate medievalism and
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Frankenstein: The 1818 Text
The Sorrows of Young Werther
Wuthering Heights
Songs of Innocence and of Experience
Lyrical Ballads
Pride and Prejudice
Jane Eyre
The Scarlet Letter
The Complete Poems
The Rime of the Ancient Mariner
Emma
Persuasion
Sense and Sensibility
Mansfield Park
Les Misérables

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F. Scott Fitzgerald
If personality is an unbroken series of successful gestures, then there was something gorgeous about him, some heightened sensitivity to the promises of life, as if he were related to one of those intricate machines that register earthquakes ten thousand miles away. This responsiveness had nothing to do with that flabby impressionability which is dignified under the name of the "creative temperament"--it was an extraordinary gift for hope, a romantic readiness such as I have never found in any o ...more
F. Scott Fitzgerald, The Great Gatsby

John Derbyshire
The ordinary modes of human thinking are magical, religious, social, and personal. We want our wishes to come true; we want the universe to care about us; we want the approval of those around us; we want to get even with that s.o.b. who insulted us at the last tribal council. For most people, wanting to know the cold truth about the world is way, way down the list.
John Derbyshire, We Are Doomed: Reclaiming Conservative Pessimism

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