Clàssics

A classic stands the test of time. The work is usually considered to be a representation of the period in which it was written; and the work merits lasting recognition. In other words, if the book was published in the recent past, the work is not a classic.

A classic has a certain universal appeal. Great works of literature touch us to our very core beings--partly because they integrate themes that are understood by readers from a wide range of backgrounds and levels of experience. Themes of love, hate, death, life, and faith touch upon some of our most basic emotional responses.

Although the
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Animal Farm
The Alchemist
The Handmaid's Tale (The Handmaid's Tale, #1)
1984
And Then There Were None
Fahrenheit 451
The Great Gatsby
The Metamorphosis
To Kill a Mockingbird
Murder on the Orient Express (Hercule Poirot, #10)
Of Mice and Men
The Picture of Dorian Gray
The Hobbit, or There and Back Again
The Old Man and the Sea
The Catcher in the Rye
Pride and Prejudice
To Kill a Mockingbird
The Great Gatsby
Jane Eyre
1984
Wuthering Heights
Animal Farm
The Catcher in the Rye
Little Women
Frankenstein: The 1818 Text
Lord of the Flies
The Picture of Dorian Gray
Romeo and Juliet
Of Mice and Men
Sense and Sensibility