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Stolen from Our Embrace: The Abduction of First Nations Children and the Restoration of Aboriginal Communities
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Stolen from Our Embrace: The Abduction of First Nations Children and the Restoration of Aboriginal Communities

4.37  ·  Rating details ·  41 ratings  ·  4 reviews
This important and timely book is a balance of the most gruesome elements of assimilation: church-run schools, the child welfare system, survivors of sexual abuse, and Fetal Alcohol Syndrome counter-balanced against heroic stories of children who survived, fought back, and found their way home. Harrowing stories are presented wherever possible in the first person, by ...more
Paperback, 248 pages
Published June 1st 1998 by Douglas McIntyre (first published October 1st 1997)
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Lisa Marie
Sep 09, 2007 rated it really liked it
Recommends it for: everyone
"Stolen From Our Embrace" is an exceptional historical and oral account, I recommend its reading to deepen your understanding of how aboriginal communities have been impacted by the polices of social welfare systems and why contemporary discussions of Indian child welfare and transracial adoption and foster care are ultimately shaped by their histories. For me, this book was also another example to help me make parallels between of the ways in which colonization that impacted First Nations ...more
Lesley
Jun 16, 2017 rated it really liked it
Shelves: read-non-fiction
This was the first book I read about residential schools back in the late 1990's soon after it was published (as part of a Social Work class). It effected me greatly. As this book approaches almost 20 years, and after that many years practicing my profession, it saddens and sickens me how little progress we have made in our country in ameliorating life for indigenous children and ensuring justice for indigenous people and communities. This book remains a critical read for all Canadians.
Caylee Richardson
Oct 28, 2017 rated it it was amazing
A sad book.
Read for my Aboriginal Studies class.
Laneene
Sep 13, 2014 rated it it was amazing
This is one of the most powerful books i've ever read. I was shocked, heartbroken, incredibly angry but mostly just so saddened by the destruction of young lives. Why? I wanted to reach into this book and take hold of each child and hug them, love the pain away...never being able to have kids, my heart broke to see the abuse suffered by them. Shame on the systems that were meant to safeguard them. The legacy of colonization is harrowing and confronting but truth all the same. I dare you to read ...more
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