Jason’s review of The Hobbit > Likes and Comments

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message 1: by Lucinda (new)

Lucinda I have to completely agree with you in that JRR Tolkien's The Hobbit is truely great and i also cannot wait until the release this Cristmas of the new film adaptation. If 'The lord of the Rings' films are anything to go by then i can safely say without a doubt that it will be truely spectacular! xx


message 2: by Jason (new)

Jason Koivu I'm really looking forward to them too, Lucinda! At first I didn't like the idea that they were splitting The Hobbit up into two movies. "Unnatural" and "Unnecessary" were a couple of words that came to mind. But since then I've warmed to the idea, really for no other reason than that there will be more time for Peter Jackson to pack in more material from the book!


message 3: by Lucinda (new)

Lucinda I think that Peter Jackson is truely increadible and how amazing the LOTR films were, as they exceeded by far all expectations. I have watched the extended version DVD's so many times now, that it will be nice to have a change and see the Hobbit.
Lucinda x


message 4: by B0nnie (new)

B0nnie yay, I'm counting down the days too. And Lucinda, yes so true and that includes all the extras - and the names of fans in the end credits - full of regret for not getting on that list...


message 5: by Jim (new)

Jim Hey Jason,

I saw on another review that you'd gone to see The Hobbit at the cinematic frame rate and that you would go again "within a few hours" to see it in 3D (which implies 48FPS).

So, did you see it again?

We, teenagers and I, went to see it 3D/48FPS on the second day. I figured it would be a loonnnng line - but no! We got great seats.

We went to see it again "flat/24FPS" 6PM Saturday past - it was sold out!

A check of Box Office Mojo confirms that the film is going strong. $17-million on it's 4th 3-day weekend - which compares well with Skyfall's $16-million for it's similar weekend.

I was thoroughly charmed by the film - laughing often at the beginning (when few others did, oh well)*

It was a treat to see Frodo and the 60-years-older Bilbo. I was glad to see Sauruman and Galadriel, too - even though none of those four appeared in the novel.

(so much for "purism")

OK, we could have done without the senile wizard (Radagast?) and his sled-bunnies (was that in the book?) - but that part was not too god-awful-long.

The setup for the quest - showing the destruction of the Dwarf-empire but not Smaug himself - was well-done.

Of course the dinner-meeting was just as funny in the movie as the book. Plus, I'm glad to see that Dwarves will clean up after themselves - and leave quietly in the morning.

Andy Serkin knocked it out of the park (as we knew he would) as both Gollum and Smeagol.

And the orcses were suitably nasty.

We will certainly go again.


*We laughed, alone, at many of the hoary old jokes in Young Frankenstein which was reprised on Halloween. I could watch that one again and again..... Frau BLUCHER!!


message 6: by Jason (new)

Jason Koivu I did see it in 3D, but I don't know which frame rate it was. All I know is it wasn't good 3D. I actually preferred seeing it in good old fashioned 2D, as it has at times stunning scenery and doesn't need embellishment. Also, the theater was having trouble with the sound, but that's another issue.

Even with those complaints in mind, I still enjoyed watching it a second time. Yeah, I don't think it needed to be almost 3 hours long and not all of those extra scenes were necessary, but it's still good stuff.

If I recall correctly, Radagast only gets a single line of mention in either The Hobbit or Fellowship of the Ring. I could've done without as much of him, especially not the sled race scene. Saruman and Galadriel, and even the orcs, were all additions not in the original book, but I thought Jackson did a good job imaging or realigning (orcs in place of goblins) these scenes Tolkien later fit into the timeline or only hinted at when he put LotR together.


message 7: by Ruby (new)

Ruby I also saw the film, and have read the book, and I loved it!! The next film should be brilliant as well! I noticed that in the beginning scene, with Frodo and Bilbo, Frodo runs off to greet the great wizard Gandalf, and that is the starting scene of The Lord of the Rings: The Fellowship of the Rings :)


message 8: by Melissa W (new)

Melissa W A friend of mine saw the movie in 3D and didn't like it (I have heard a lot of people didn't like it in 3D) and went to see it again in 2D.


message 9: by Dustin (new)

Dustin Wow, fantastic review, Jason!!


message 10: by Ivana (new)

Ivana nice review...I agree that Hobbit is one of those books one can reread many times and I would say that goes pretty much for all Tolkien's writing.


message 11: by Jerry (new)

Jerry Nice Jason...I felt the same when I first read this book in 1975 at the ripe old age of 10! I too continue to read it every few years and have had my three kids read it as well...and I always find some new tidbit of wisdom previously missed...well done


message 12: by Jason (new)

Jason Koivu Thanks to everyone who's commented lately! Y'all are swell folks for having taken the time to read my reviews!


message 13: by Maree (new)

Maree I actually heard that they're making three movies out of it, rather than two. And they're using a bunch of Tolkien's notes for the stuff that's not in the book, his notes about the background events with the council and such.


message 14: by Jason (new)

Jason Koivu Maree ♫ Light's Shadow ♪ wrote: "I actually heard that they're making three movies out of it, rather than two. And they're using a bunch of Tolkien's notes for the stuff that's not in the book, his notes about the background even..."

You've heard correctly. It'll be 3, not 2 movies.


message 15: by Jim (new)

Jim Went to go see The Hobbit again - "flat" and 24FPS.

Unlike Fellowship, The Hobbit was not compelling enough to really hold me second time 'round.

It was one of the lesser movie houses in town - so the seats were less comfy and my impression was that they projected at less-than-standard brightness (a lamp-saving measure, much complained about by certain reviewers).

Further, they were alleged to have introduced blur - to make the presentation more "cinematic" - so motion seemed less sharp than native 24FPS would be (my imagination?)

Daughter said the film looked "less cheezy" than 48FPS.

Having been primed by 48FPS/3D I felt the loss on re-viewing. This could well have been the combination of the lack-of-novelty and substandard brightness.

Bottom line to date - I'll continue to seek out 48FPS versions of films that interest me. Of course this includes The Hobbit - Part 2.


Tabitha (Pabkins) I LOVE the 70's version of the cartoon also! What did you think about The Last Unicorn if you ever watched that - I think animated by the same people.


message 17: by Jason (new)

Jason Koivu Tabitha the Pabkins wrote: "I LOVE the 70's version of the cartoon also! What did you think about The Last Unicorn if you ever watched that - I think animated by the same people."

Ah yes, I've read and seen The Last Unicorn. There's boobies in that! :O


Tabitha (Pabkins) Jason wrote: "Ah yes, I've read and seen The Last Unicorn. There's boobies in that! :O "

You would horn in on the boobies! *ba-dum-chum*


message 19: by Indeneri (new)

Indeneri Thanks for this great review.

I've never read Tolkien for myself. The copy in my local library had too many small words on too many thin pages, warped by too many eager hands. A total put off.

But your review has made me change my mind. I may even read it before the movie comes out (in South Africa).


message 20: by Forrest (new)

Forrest I taught my kids the song "Where there's a Whip, there's a Way" from the animated Lord of the Rings. Sometimes, even now as teenagers, they'll sing it when they're doing chores.


message 21: by Jason (new)

Jason Koivu Indeneri wrote: "Thanks for this great review.

I've never read Tolkien for myself. The copy in my local library had too many small words on too many thin pages, warped by too many eager hands. A total put off.

..."


Thanks for your comments, Indeneri!


message 22: by Jason (new)

Jason Koivu Forrest wrote: "I taught my kids the song "Where there's a Whip, there's a Way" from the animated Lord of the Rings. Sometimes, even now as teenagers, they'll sing it when they're doing chores."

I wish you'd been my parent. I had to learn that song all by myself!


message 23: by Forrest (new)

Forrest Jason wrote: "I wish you'd been my parent. I had to learn that song all by myself!"

I corrupted my children early and often.


message 24: by Nabz28 (new)

Nabz28 Wow great review! I didn't know 'The Hobbit' was a very old storybook. I read this book 2 months after I saw the movie and there were a lot of difference of course. I'm still reading Part 1 of the book.
The movie ends showing Smaug and the misty mountain, but in the book there was still more adventure and actions which I think fascinates everybody reading the book. They shouldn't have left the part about Beorn and he's fellow animal friends from the movie. Hopefully they will include more scenes in 'Desolation of Smaug'. Looking forward to finding out more about the adventure still yet to come for Bilbo, the Dwarves and Gandalf in the rest of the story.


message 25: by Jason (new)

Jason Koivu Nabz28 wrote: "Wow great review! I didn't know 'The Hobbit' was a very old storybook. I read this book 2 months after I saw the movie and there were a lot of difference of course. I'm still reading Part 1 of the ..."

It was published 1937, but I believe Tolkien started it while he was in the trenches during World War I.


message 26: by Melissa (new)

Melissa Thomas Great review! I loved this book it is a great story of a journey that had so many ups and downs kept me interested every second.


message 27: by Jason (new)

Jason Koivu Joe wrote: "Great review! I loved this book it is a great story of a journey that had so many ups and downs kept me interested every second."

Thanks!


message 28: by Jim (new)

Jim Peter Jackson was given too long a leash when New Line stretched this one book out to three separate movies.

Alas, one great movie is not what we got. The suits are smug - 1.8-billion in world-wide box office to date. We will never know, before his memoir, just how much Jackson wanted to play so fast and loose with a relatively tight tale. Certainly, his fee at least doubled vis-a-vis one film - hard to turn down.

It's strange to see a mid-30s Orlando Bloom play an apparently aged yet 60-years-younger elf (wonder if his arm got tired shoot all those point blank arrows?)

McKellen playing another quasi-immortal wizard seemed to age even more.


And honestly, can Richard Armitage (as Thorin Oakenshield) act with any other part of his body besides his eyebrows?

I'm just happy they didn't cast Keanu Reeve - the king of the wooden aspect. He might have been perfect as one of the statues, though.

The Bilbo character is well done. I got quite tired of Frodo's deer-in-the-headlights expression


message 29: by Jason (new)

Jason Koivu Jim wrote: "Peter Jackson was given too long a leash when New Line stretched this one book out to three separate movies.

Alas, one great movie is not what we got. The suits are smug - 1.8-billion in world-wid..."


It's too bad New Line didn't start with The Hobbit, make one movie and then based on its success, they might have allowed a little more elbow from for the Lord of the Rings movies, which I would've been okay with. Milking 3 movies out of The Hobbit is asking too much from the cash cow. And yes, I'm sure Jackson wasn't actually given much choice as to how many films he'd have to put out, but did he need to make each one sooo long?


message 30: by Monika (new)

Monika Forget about poop-headed Radagast, crazy-browed Thorin, and bloated Legolas. What in the name of the Simarills is the purpose of Tauriel?! As a woman, I'm offended that apparently I not supposed to relate to characters unless they are female. Sorry, Ponyboy Curtis, my childhood was obviously a sham perpetuated by a misogynistic rape culture... "nothing gold can stay."

So we "need" a bad-asd, girl elf for some girl power, huh? Then why throw her in the middle of a love triangle?!
SPOILER ALERT:
Did anyone else think that while healing Kili, rather than channeling the mysticism of Arwen, Tauriel looked a little constipated (or suffering from a stroke, I can't quite decide).

Apologies for ranting, but as a woman, I'm prone to emotional outbursts because no one understands me and apparently need a boyfriend to fill some void. Maybe I'll go read Twilight.


message 31: by Jason (new)

Jason Koivu Monika wrote: "Forget about poop-headed Radagast, crazy-browed Thorin, and bloated Legolas. What in the name of the Simarills is the purpose of Tauriel?! As a woman, I'm offended that apparently I not supposed to..."

Agreed. If a strong female role wasn't in the book, then why shove it into the movie? (That's a rhetorical question.) It's too bad Tolkien didn't include good/role-modely type female characters in the original, but them's the breaks, I say.


message 32: by Johnathon (new)

Johnathon Pena I am reading the book and its good. Im gonna get into the lord of the rings trilogys and other great books iv herd of. Iv never seen the lord of the ri gs or read it. But I really want to get into that stuff. Good stories great fairy tales. I find it calming and interesting to read good books. I never really like books at all. But after hearing alot of good talk about books. I want to get into reading and im really liking it. the hobbit movie sort of inspired me to get into the book and from there im moving into the lord of the rings wich is next tho I never read or seen it. Its great im starting off at the beginning for a beginner.


message 33: by Johnathon (new)

Johnathon Pena Btw I love the movies I just watched the hobbit desolation of smaug its awesome.


message 34: by Jason (new)

Jason Koivu Johnathon wrote: "I am reading the book and its good. Im gonna get into the lord of the rings trilogys and other great books iv herd of. Iv never seen the lord of the ri gs or read it. But I really want to get into ..."

Thanks for reading and commenting on my review, Johnathon! Tolkien's books are what got me into reading. Not only does he tell a fun adventure story, but he also adds in a lot of background detail to help create a new world that seems very real. The Hobbit and Lord of the Rings are good stuff and I think you'll enjoy the ride!


message 35: by Jason (new)

Jason Koivu Adam wrote: "I am much similar like the above commenter, "Johnathan". I too started reading recently and just finished 'The Hobbit". I literally can't describe how much fascinating reading is, cus I'm not that ..."

Thanks, Adam!

I agree with you about the movies. If you like the book, I wouldn't suggest watching Jackson's new Hobbit trilogy. He's adding all kinds of stuff that's not in the book. Some of it makes sense and adds to the overall LotR story, but much of it is only added so that his lengthening of The Hobbit makes more sense and is more exciting for viewers.


message 36: by Gianfranco (new)

Gianfranco Montebello I started smoking a pipe thanks to this book, let me tell you, the experience is almost as good and magical as reading this masterpiece.


message 37: by Karen Knight (new)

Karen Knight onlyc


message 38: by Miquel (new)

Miquel Reina I think that is my favourite book of all time! ;)


message 39: by Luciana (last edited Nov 20, 2015 09:50PM) (new)

Luciana Sadly, The Hobbit and the rest of The Lord of the Rings books did not accompany me during my childhood; I hope that I am not that late to join the club, now. I read the book last year and totally loved it wholeheartedly, and I know that the hype is already gone, but I've got to admit that it is one of the most amazing stories which belongs to fiction and the adventure genre. I really liked your comparison between the original work, the animation and the film by director Peter Jackson; I never thought someone would even recognize the cartoons since they tend to have a bad reputation due to the fact that they seem so weird and whimsical, and for some people the aesthetic and interpetation of the artists is not appealing. I believe the movie was badly manipulated by the director, adding characters and scenes that do not belong to the book, as if he filled in parts that he couldn't extract from the story. Still, the visual effects are amazing and some parts are even humorous as in the book. J.R.R Tolkien does an amazing job immersing the reader into a universe that we would all love to experience.


message 40: by Jason (new)

Jason Koivu Luciana wrote: "Sadly, The Hobbit and the rest of The Lord of the Rings books did not accompany me during my childhood; I hope that I am not that late to join the club, now. I read the book last year and totally l..."

I don't think it's too late to enjoy the books even for those who have seen the movies. I mean, I saw those old cartoon versions before reading the books and I still enjoyed them. The books have so much more detail than any adaption. There's plenty to be discovered within Tolkien's work.


message 41: by Luciana (new)

Luciana Jason wrote: "Luciana wrote: "Sadly, The Hobbit and the rest of The Lord of the Rings books did not accompany me during my childhood; I hope that I am not that late to join the club, now. I read the book last ye..."

I actually already read the whole series; what I was talking about is the fact that a lot of time has passed and all the hype that the people had in the past is gone, but I know that everyone will keep loving and remembering these books even if no more movies or extra content is released.


message 42: by Jason (new)

Jason Koivu Luciana wrote: "Jason wrote: "Luciana wrote: "Sadly, The Hobbit and the rest of The Lord of the Rings books did not accompany me during my childhood; I hope that I am not that late to join the club, now. I read th..."

Ah yes, agreed!


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