Melissa’s review of Ready Player One (Ready Player One, #1) > Likes and Comments

540 likes · 
Comments (showing 1-50 of 163) (163 new)    post a comment »

message 1: by Xavier (new)

Xavier Hmm. Did you ever think that a book like this is, (shocking, I know) just a book? Read it and enjoy it, stop wasting everyones time with doing a multi-level analyzation of this book with all of the other books in this sublevel of a genre.


message 2: by Noetic_Hatter (new)

Noetic_Hatter Great review. I didn't even think about the issue of the OASIS being a supercorporation -- though of course it is, or the prize wouldn't be $240 billion!

I was too busy being distracted by deus ex machina events or stupid plot developments -- some of which you didn't even get to. "Oh, by the way, did I forget to mention that awhile back, off-screen -- of course -- I happened to buy a secret password that would make me all powerful?" Ugggh.


message 3: by Melissa (new)

Melissa McShane Derrick wrote: "Great review. I didn't even think about the issue of the OASIS being a supercorporation -- though of course it is, or the prize wouldn't be $240 billion!

I was too busy being distracted by deus e..."


Wow. Now I'm even gladder that I didn't finish it. Still, it makes me sad, because it was such a great idea--postapocalyptic cyber-future crossed with quest fantasy....


message 4: by David (new)

David I am going to say this as nice as I can as to not offend you, You Are An Idiot!!! This book was great and if you spent more time reading (you know above a 2nd grade level) and not finding all the douche things to nitpick at you may have seen that.


message 5: by Melissa (new)

Melissa McShane David wrote: "I am going to say this as nice as I can as to not offend you, You Are An Idiot!!! This book was great and if you spent more time reading (you know above a 2nd grade level) and not finding all the d..."

I think you should go back to school and learn the difference between what you like and what is great. You loved it? Wonderful! I'm serious about that. If you got something out of it, fine. But what you're really saying here is that my opinion--my criticism of something you loved--made you angry, because you believe that just because you loved the book, that makes it great. Garbage. You can't answer any of the criticisms I made, so you had to revert to some kind of personal attack. But since you seem to have interpreted my review as a personal attack, I guess you assumed that was acceptable dialogue. Are you sure you're not the one reading at a 2nd grade level? If you have anything substantive to say about my review, I'd love to hear it. Otherwise, don't waste my time or yours anymore.


message 6: by Noetic_Hatter (last edited May 23, 2012 08:58AM) (new)

Noetic_Hatter Melissa, I got a similar response to my review from someone who wrote a bit more eloquently but can be summed up by his first line, "All of the wit and fun of this book was lost on you." I simply responded by saying we'll just have to disagree. :-P

Perhaps it was lost on readers like me and you. Or perhaps the book is not as good as its champions would have the world believe. Perhaps it's really just wish-fulfillment fan-fiction, with a side of OCD?


message 7: by Melissa (new)

Melissa McShane Derrick wrote: "Melissa, I got a similar response to my review from someone who wrote a bit more eloquently but can be summed up by his first line, "All of the wit and fun of this book was lost on you." I simply r..."

It is true that the wit and fun was lost on us, but the corollary--that there is something wrong with us because we don't have that experience--is simply not true. You might just as easily say that the brilliance of Dracula is lost on people who can't understand 19th-century language and the epistolary structure--that doesn't mean anything about whether or not it's a good book. The real problem is that it's hard to remember that what we like in books has almost nothing to do with their quality, even though we'd like to tell ourselves that we are just so discerning that of course we only like what's great. :) But all it takes to remember that is to recognize that scarfing down, for example, a bag of Lay's Salt and Vinegar chips may taste great, but isn't good for us.

So yeah, I think the book was incredibly flawed. But I have a very good friend who loved it, and I don't think less of her for it; it's clear that we went into it looking for very different things. *Is* it wish-fulfillment fan-fiction, or just it just serve the same purpose? And does it matter if there's a difference, if the outcome is the same? I don't know. I think you may have a point there--doesn't it sound like its champions universally take that "you're thinking too hard/picking too many nits" approach? To me that seems similar to how fan-fiction works for its readers; it may not be written at the highest level (though some of it is), but it provides an emotional outlet for readers who share a love for a particular world.

But preferences aside, I'm sticking with the "awful" evaluation as far as literary quality goes. :)


message 8: by David (new)

David Yes, you are correct about only one thing in your comment, it is wonderful that I believe the book is great and that I got something out of it. You are entitled to your criticism and what you though about the book is good for you, but as I stated in my comment my goal was "not to offend". Seeing as you took this as a "personal attack" shows that you are even unable to have a conversation with a person about ones opinions or criticism which is what I thought this site was suppose to be about. You have no personal connection to me so for you to assume that your comment made me "angry" is laughable at best, I actually really did not and still do not care what your personal feelings/criticism are about this book my life goes on without a dent. So with that being said I am going to grant your final request "If you have anything substantive to say about my review, I'd love to hear it. Otherwise, don't waste my time or yours anymore." and not continue this back and forth with you because it is quit apparent that the only opinion/criticism that matters to you is your own and no one may have any other opinion of their own because you may just see it as a "personal attack". It really was not and I am sorry you took it that way, I really only wanted to see if we could have a conversation about what I believe is a "great" book and you are entitled to your own opinion, but it would have been nice to be able to discuss these opinions, but I guess it is not meant to be.


message 9: by Melissa (new)

Melissa McShane David wrote: "Yes, you are correct about only one thing in your comment, it is wonderful that I believe the book is great and that I got something out of it. You are entitled to your criticism and what you thoug..."

You wanted a *conversation*? Seriously? So you called me an idiot, suggested that I spend more time reading, and referred to every criticism I made as "douche nitpicking" instead of actually taking those points on? And thought that saying you weren't trying to offend somehow made all of that an innocent request for a civil conversation? You're right. That's not a personal attack. How silly of me to have misunderstood.

I see from your profile that you're very new to this site, so maybe you don't know how this works, but I'll suggest that in the future you take the time to figure out why you disagree with other readers and say so, instead of resorting to name-calling. You'll probably ignore that advice, but there it is.


message 10: by Hallie (new)

Hallie Wow. Do you *often* get people calling you an idiot (with multiple exclamation marks!!!) and the things you found to nitpick douchery? I feel a strong urge to correct the grammar and spelling mistakes in the two comments in red. Sorry you got this rubbish, even though you're probably well able to deal with it!

And back to the book: the range of ratings from friends and people I follow is intriguing. But the thought of those infodumps makes me very, very weary. Great review. :)


message 11: by Melissa (new)

Melissa McShane Hallie wrote: "Wow. Do you *often* get people calling you an idiot (with multiple exclamation marks!!!) and the things you found to nitpick douchery?"

Yes. Yes I do.

I like this book as a clear example of what does and does not work for different readers. With almost no exceptions, the ones who hate it share the same reasons for hating it, and the ones who love it share the same reasons for loving it. There's none of the clutter you get with, say, Twilight, where people who hate the series are as likely to be part of a cultural backlash as to have articulate reasons for hating it. From a critical standpoint, it's really very interesting.


message 12: by Jessica (new)

Jessica Okay. I will never get over this: "I'm going to say this as nice as I can . . . You Are An Idiot!!!" Wow, good thing he was being so nice! Otherwise that might have been rude! And such an insightful dissection of your review, too!

As Hallie says: back to the book: I have this on my to-read list. I am also fascinated by the range of ratings. Will I love it or hate it? I love Stephenson, I love Williams, I love the Eighties . . . THE TENSION!


message 13: by Hallie (new)

Hallie Melissa wrote: "Hallie wrote: "Wow. Do you *often* get people calling you an idiot (with multiple exclamation marks!!!) and the things you found to nitpick douchery?"

Yes. Yes I do."


Well, there's another reason to be depressed about the state of humanity!

More cheerfully, what you say about the lack of reaction clutter is fascinating. I'm now kind of itching to read through *all* the reviews and - you know, look for the relevant factors such as age, other sf reading, admission of having sported a mullet in the past -- just for fun, not statistical analysis, you understand.


message 14: by Jacob (new)

Jacob Proffitt Hallie wrote: "I'm now kind of itching to read through *all* the reviews and - you know, look for the relevant factors such as age, other sf reading, admission of having sported a mullet in the past -- just for fun, not statistical analysis, you understand."

Is it sad that I read this and thought "Can I play, too?"


message 15: by Jessica (new)

Jessica Jacob, your mission is clear. You must do this. For the sake of humanity. Either Dan or Robison Wells (possibly both) absolutely loved this book, though they admitted it was flawed. So, if that helps you get started . . .


message 16: by Jacob (new)

Jacob Proffitt Nononono. If it's a duty, I'll never do it...


message 17: by Melissa (new)

Melissa McShane Hallie wrote: More cheerfully, what you say about the lack of reaction clutter is fascinating. I'm now kind of itching to read through *all* the reviews and - you know, look for the relevant factors such as age, other sf reading, admission of having sported a mullet in the past -- just for fun, not statistical analysis, you understand.

I totally understand that feeling. All I know for sure is that it breaks down into three groups: the ones who absolutely loved it but are inexperienced readers, the experienced readers who recognize it has flaws but love it anyway, and the experienced readers for whom the flaws are a deal-breaker. I've never seen a stronger demonstration of the influence of personality on the reading experience. Yes, I totally want to break down all those reviews to identify relevant factors. It's positively fascinating.


message 18: by Melissa (new)

Melissa McShane Jessica wrote: "Okay. I will never get over this: "I'm going to say this as nice as I can . . . You Are An Idiot!!!" Wow, good thing he was being so nice! Otherwise that might have been rude!"

Isn't it great to see that civil discourse is alive and well in America?

If you love Stephenson and Williams...yeah, I'd really like to see how you feel about it. Particularly in comparison to The Diamond Age, which is maybe its closest neighbor.


message 19: by Jessica (new)

Jessica When I got on Goodreads this morning and saw the READY PLAYER ONE banner, I just about died laughing. It's inescapable, Melissa! Now I REALLY want to read it!


message 20: by Melissa (new)

Melissa McShane I KNOW!!! It totally cracked me up. It's like the stupid book is following me. Why can't I be followed around by something good, like Anathem?


message 21: by Jason (new)

Jason A. Interesting thoughts on the book. I am halfway through and I feel like it is just starting to get good. The dues ex machina about Wade being on the world for the first key didn't throw me, as all protagonists have to be in a spot for a reason. I understand your points of why this book didn't appeal to you, and they seem valid. I might be blinded by all of the nostalgia in the air. Happy reading.


message 22: by Melissa (new)

Melissa McShane Jason wrote: "Interesting thoughts on the book. I am halfway through and I feel like it is just starting to get good. The dues ex machina about Wade being on the world for the first key didn't throw me, as all p..."

I read somewhere that it's going to be made into a movie. I hope so. I think the stuff I didn't like will mostly go away--and all that nostalgia is so good!


message 23: by Jessica (new)

Jessica I'm on page 110 now. The infodumpage at the beginning was indeed terrible to behold. Also, whenever he says "James Halliday" I hear *cough*Steve Jobs*cough* in my head. But the kid is endearing and so are his friends. I am invested and want to know what will happen. Some of the things he's "invented" like going to school virtually, ARE ALREADY HAPPENING, which is irritating.


message 24: by Melissa (new)

Melissa McShane No kidding. My daughter just graduated from a virtual school--the only difference being that she couldn't exactly plug in for the full sensory experience.

I still say I'll like the movie version better unless they totally screw it up.


message 25: by Jessica (new)

Jessica And yes, there's no sense of giving "props" to books like this that have gone before, like OTHERLAND or THE DIAMOND AGE. Don't namecheck Stephenson if you're not going to compare your virtual school to the Young Ladies' Primer . . . which I would have loved!


message 26: by Chris (last edited Jul 31, 2012 10:57AM) (new)

Chris Gave up after 50 pages for this reason. Not very good delivery for a book with much potential. It felt like a brag about research at a lot of points, and no thought to the delivery of the story. The first 50 pages were full of description, and very little actually happened. Disappointing.


message 27: by Jessica (new)

Jessica The first fifty pages are horrid. But after that, I swear, it got awesome. I ended up loving it. But it made me wonder if his editor lost the first 50-100 pages and didn't want to admit it. He was like a different writer in the end.


message 28: by Melissa (new)

Melissa McShane I got past p. 150 before giving up and never felt that it got awesome, because so much of the underlying premise felt false to me--not just because I disliked his writing.


message 29: by Jessica (new)

Jessica Remind me to just tell you what happened at the end next book club. :)


message 30: by Melissa (new)

Melissa McShane Don't worry. I skimmed the rest of the book and read the last few pages. Had to know how it turned out, after all. :)


message 31: by Verylazydaisy (new)

Verylazydaisy I'm halfway through this book right now, and I have to say.. Sometimes I'm caught up in the descriptions of this bleak future and the game environment, but other times I'm sick to death of the constant flow of 80's references. Part of what drew me to this book was those exact references.. I found it fun and fascinating. But the author "dumps" so many of them a time, that it often feels like one of those annoying songs from the era that just calls out lists of city names. (wishing I could recall a title at the moment.. Or actually not)
I will finish the book, and I'm not sure yet if I love or hate it, but I do find the range of reviews interesting. Thanks for sharing yours.


message 32: by Christopher (new)

Christopher Pettit Wow... the amount of Hipster reviews in the commenting. "I so read this in this other book... this is not original." Grow up people. Review the book based on if you like it or not... I don't need to name drop to say the book was okay but not great. I recommend these other books instead because I know... Pretty much everything new is a spin on previous works, be it books, movies or history. If you are just learning this... Sorry to tell you, Santa isn't real either.


message 33: by Melissa (new)

Melissa McShane Christopher wrote: "Wow... the amount of Hipster reviews in the commenting. "I so read this in this other book... this is not original." Grow up people. Review the book based on if you like it or not... I don't need t..."

You obviously don't understand the purpose of a critical review--and by critical I mean literary criticism, not simply being negative. If you don't like this kind of review, don't read it and don't let it bother you. But thanks for telling me to grow up. I can see you're a very mature individual. Santa thinks so too.


message 34: by Christopher (new)

Christopher Pettit I'm not complaining about the critical reviewing... Hey, I agree it wasn't as great as all the hype was, but I don't start going "That band sounds so like the Beatles, no originality." Please. If they sound like the Beatles, good on them... but I go "I think this book isn't that great, maybe if you want to get what is missed with this book, go check out these books instead." Like Otherland and The Diamond Age... they probably stole their concepts from another work which stole their concepts from another work too.


message 35: by Karen (new)

Karen I enjoyed the premise and the plot and all that but sweet lord just like you said, every few paragraphs INFO DUMP. I could not take all the random crap thrown in. It was like reading a novel where someone jammed a sci-fi encyclopedia/wishlist in between actual useful passages and I just got exhausted trying to find my way back to the story.


message 36: by Karen (new)

Karen And why the hell are all these geniuses telling you not to review a book you read on a site where people come to read book reviews?


message 37: by Chris (new)

Chris Agree Karen! I couldn't bring myself to wade through it to get to the story contained within the wikipedia style dumps. This is the only book I've given up on, ever. I am very patient but this was one step too far!


message 38: by Helen (new)

Helen My review touched on the same points. I didn't like the book either. But you seem to have upset the fandom. The fandom thinks you're stupid because you don't agree with them. But that's the nature of fandom: it often discourages engagement with criticism, no matter how thoughtful that criticism is.


message 39: by TimeyWimeyBooks (new)

TimeyWimeyBooks I was also really frustrated by the massive amount of time spent on infodumps. Everytime it seemed like we might finally get going, the story would grind to a halt again and there'd be more infodumping! If you just take the parts of the story that aren't exposition and put them together, this would be a VERY short book. But the egg hunt did keep me turning the pages. I don't think I would read it again, but I might consider the sequel. I'll just skim the boring parts, lol.


message 40: by Jenny (new)

Jenny I wanted to like this book, I really did, but the excessive amount of 80's references and gaming infor were a bit too much. Yes, I know the 80's - I lived them and I've played plenty of MMORPG's as well. I finished the book because I have left far too many books unfinished in the past and didn't want my money to be completely wasted by setting this aside. (To those who say that someone's an idiot for not liking a book they like has obviously never heard of freedom of choice.) I like what I like; you like what you like, but I'm not going to name call because we don't share the passion for the same things. We'll just agree to disagree. Like I said, I really wanted to like this book, but I just didn't.


message 41: by Jamie (new)

Jamie Xavier wrote: "Hmm. Did you ever think that a book like this is, (shocking, I know) just a book? Read it and enjoy it, stop wasting everyones time with doing a multi-level analyzation of this book with all of the..."

I categorically disagree with your comment Xavier.
How can we be expected to " Read it and enjoy it " if its so poorly written?
A multi-level analysis, otherwise known as a review, is the backbone of Goodreads.


message 42: by Sara (new)

Sara Weather Thank you. I was turned off by the info dump in the prologue and decided to dump it right there. I have been annoyed with authors who rehash the same ideas other authors already explored. I thought I was the only one who got annoyed by this.


message 43: by Jamie (new)

Jamie I struggle to see why this book is so highly regarded.
If you peruse the reviews of this book you will find plenty of praise for the 80’s references. I was born in 1974 and recognized pretty much every music, film and videogame reference, unfortunately I found them forced, uninspired and tedious. It didn't contribute enough to the story and was delivered in a clunky, jarring fashion.
I’m a very forgiving reader so decided to tolerate the name dropping. I found the writing to be very one dimensional and linear, I was mentally screaming at the author to mix it up and let his creative juices flow but aside from a few glimpses of a possible darker, deeper story I was ultimately disappointed.

While I’m in the mood for a rant I have to mention the predictable, convenient placement and timing of artifacts, keys, special powers and weapons. I couldn't believe what I was reading, somebody would find or be given said artifact, the properties would be duly explained, the character would wait for the inevitable situation to arise and use the artifact. Repeat.
Also, the premise of the book is based on the potential entire population of the internet searching for keys and gates, yet somehow our main protagonists happen to beat everybody to the punch, every time. Time and time again our protagonist would pluck a solution out of seemingly thin air or be struck by some divine inspiration.

It’s not all bad, the story chugs along nicely and there are a few interesting ideas.
This book has very high ratings, somebody seems to like it, for me, too many negatives.


message 44: by Karl (new)

Karl Too much analysis.


message 45: by Jamie (new)

Jamie Too much analysis?
Isn't that the point of this website?


message 46: by Melissa (new)

Melissa McShane What Moidelhoff said.


message 47: by Bob (new)

Bob Sherriff Boo your opinion


message 48: by Jamie (new)

Jamie Thanks for the inspired input Bob.
I'll treasure it always.


message 49: by Melissa (new)

Melissa McShane Moidelhoff, you are my new favorite person.


message 50: by Jennifer (new)

Jennifer Karen wrote: "And why the hell are all these geniuses telling you not to review a book you read on a site where people come to read book reviews?"

I hear Inigo Montoya in my head: "Review. You keep saying this word. I do not think it means what you think it means."


« previous 1 3 4
back to top