Nataliya’s review of The Namesake > Likes and Comments

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message 1: by Stephen (new)

Stephen Another wonderful review, Nataliya.


message 2: by Nataliya (new)

Nataliya Thank you, Stephen. The praise means a lot coming from you - the undisputed king of GR reviews :)


message 3: by Tracy (new)

Tracy I haven't read this but I did see the movie which I liked.


message 4: by Nataliya (new)

Nataliya I heard the movie was actually better than the book, which is quite rare.


message 5: by Mary (new)

Mary "a perpetual wait, a constant burden, a continuous feeling out of sorts". It totally is like this. Added to my to-read list!


message 6: by Srinivas (new)

Srinivas nice review Nataliya, me also read this book. Jhumpa Lahiri's writing enthralls me through the stories little monotonous.


message 7: by Nataliya (new)

Nataliya That's true, I guess. But I wonder if her writing style therefore is more suited for short stories - and I will find out soon, since I already have a hard copy of "Interpreter of Maladies" just waiting to be read.


message 8: by Jonathan (new)

Jonathan I had to study 'Interpreter of Maladies' for my 2011 Year 12 exams and although I have not read The Namesake her prose is very suited to short stories. And I have read many, many short stories. And hers are definitely up there in terms of content and command of sincere, yet almost poetic language.


message 9: by Nataliya (new)

Nataliya Jonathan wrote: "I had to study 'Interpreter of Maladies' for my 2011 Year 12 exams and although I have not read The Namesake her prose is very suited to short stories. And I have read many, many short stories. And..."

Wow, it's really nice to hear. I will definitely move it up on my TBR list then. I knew it won the Pulitzer, but so did some other books that I just could not stomach, so that alone was not enough to make me read it. But now I definitely will, and soon!


message 10: by Jonathan (new)

Jonathan Prizes rarely qualify a novel for me but they do make it of interest to read. I often want to find out why they received the award. I feel that with her short stories there that I could understand why. Perhaps they did not interest me like some classic short stories have but they are well written and their characterisation is excellent.


message 11: by Nataliya (new)

Nataliya I started reading "Interpreter of Maladies", and yes - I think her writing style is well suited for short stories, much more so than for a novel.


message 12: by Nicole (new)

Nicole Nataliya wrote: "I heard the movie was actually better than the book, which is quite rare."

The movie was great. I read this a long time ago but I remember enjoying it and loving the writing style.


message 13: by Carol. (new)

Carol. Nice quotes. Gave a good feel for the language of the novel.


message 14: by Nataliya (new)

Nataliya Thanks, Carol. These seemed very representative of the style of the entire novel.


message 15: by MomToKippy (new)

MomToKippy Very nice review. I must have read a different book. Some of the driest draggy prose I have ever read. Special moments like the one quote above are few and far bewtween.


message 16: by Nataliya (new)

Nataliya MomtoKippy wrote: "Very nice review. I must have read a different book. Some of the driest draggy prose I have ever read. Special moments like the one quote above are few and far bewtween."

Another proof that perception of literature is very subjective.


message 17: by Janet (new)

Janet Just read the story and I enjoy tbis writer very much. It is a true "immigrant" tale. I have also read "The Lowlands" and I was really looking forward to another story by this author.

Enjoyed your review a lot of good points to give me a better framework this is only 3 hours after completion.


message 18: by Raya (new)

Raya Nataliya, I'm so happy I stumbled on your review. I just finished the book and thought that maybe I was being too harsh by giving it 3 stars. I agree that she is better suited to short stories; I read The Interpreter of Maladies first and liked it much better. Much of The Namesake seemed to drag on for me; some parts had too much detail, and some just barely skimmed the details, even on passages that were important. The writing style is a bit dry for my tastes. I prefer meatier prose that winds and loops and envelopes you in its beauty.

I got the feeling that the movie would be better than the book, that the gorgeous visuals and heartfelt portrayals would bring much-needed life to what could have been a fascinating book.


message 19: by Victoria (new)

Victoria Nice review. I had similar feelings about this book. Her style is better suited to short stories.


message 20: by Mickey (last edited May 19, 2017 07:44AM) (new)

Mickey Weinstein I read your review and I read "Aubrey"'s review right below it, and both speak to me. I confess that I have not yet finished this novel, but after reading about 2/3 of it, my visceral reaction so far is somewhere between you and Aubrey. Your quote is perfect and perhaps the best passage in the entire book. Her rich descriptions of the scenery and the emotions--or lack thereof--displayed by the characters in their complex web of interactions are satisfying and confirm the potential of this work. However, I too, found the endless stream of listing mundanities, brand names (was the author compensated for all this product placement?) and superficial details of appearance, dress, etc. unnecessary at best and distracting at worst. I was frankly annoyed by the glossing over the cause and course of Ashoke's sudden and unexpected death, while unnecessarily inventorying every single item and dust mite in his apartment while Gogol is cleaning it out. sorry. It's a story which attracted my interest and I will see it through to the end, but in my humble opinion not up to my expectations given the author's impressive background and reputation. Update: I finished it and my opinion has not changed. 3 stars.


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