Ben’s review of None of the Above > Likes and Comments

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message 1: by Ashley (new)

Ashley Thanks for this review. I've had this on my TBR forever, but reading your review, it doesn't really sound like the book I wanted it to be . . .

Have you read Golden Boy? I haven't read it in a couple of years, and it was written before #ownvoices, but I found it to be such a lovely book with an intersex protagonist. I don't believe the author is intersex, but the book was so well written and all the characters had such depth to them. It is pretty rough to read at points, though, in terms of subject matter.


message 2: by Ben (new)

Ben Babcock Ashley wrote: "Have you read Golden Boy? I haven't read it in a couple of years, and it was written before #ownvoices, but I found it to be such a lovely book with an intersex protagonist. I don't believe the author is intersex, but the book was so well written and all the characters had such depth to them. It is pretty rough to read at points, though, in terms of subject matter."

I have not! Thanks for suggesting it. Still wishing for more books with intersex protagonists who go through stuff that is totally unrelated to them being intersex though.


message 3: by Justine (new)

Justine I get what you are saying about identity centred stories as opposed to what I will refer to as "identity adjacent", with the identity just being part of the character, not the focus of the story. The thing is, identity centred stories have a long and established tradition in YA, so I don't think there's anything wrong with that. Also in the case of this particular book, I would point out that it is nearly 4 years old, so it was kind of on the forefront in terms of identity fiction centred on intersex. Not the first maybe, but there has been a big wave of LGBTIQ identity fiction since then.


message 4: by Ben (new)

Ben Babcock Justine wrote: "The thing is, identity centred stories have a long and established tradition in YA, so I don't think there's anything wrong with that."

I agree there's nothing wrong with it. However, it's worth examining the roles and responsibilities of own-voices authors versus authors who are outsiders to these experiences. Whose stories do we have licence to tell? How should we tell them? These are complicated questions, of course, with complex and nuanced answers that will shift as our society shifts.


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