Charles A.A. Dellschau

By Goodreads Staff | Published Apr 30, 2013 02:33PM

Brightly colored balloons festoon the pages of Charles A.A. Dellschau's ornate manuscripts—a hefty collection of thousands of drawings and press clippings that herald the advent of flight and echo the ingenious imagination of Leonardo da Vinci. The work of this iconoclastic Texan, a butcher by trade who started his creative project in his retirement in 1899 and continued until his death in 1923, is presented in the new book, Charles A.A. Dellschau. Enjoy the gallery.

Charles A.A. Dellschau > Photos > Erinnerungen (Recollections)

  • Erinnerungen (Recollections)
  • Aero Honeymoon Aviatora, May 7, 1909
  • Recolections, Ch. Diftdell and Ch. A v Roemeling Airostant. "Habicht," 1898-1900.
  • Rideme



Erinnerungen (Recollections), George Gorres Multyplus, 1900. Courtesy Stephen Romano.

Tags: 1900, charles-a-a-dellschau, and erinnerungen-recollections



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Comments (showing 1-6 of 6) (6 new)

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message 1: by Natalie (new)

Natalie That's cool looking. I like the colors used in it.


message 2: by Marie-danielle (new)

Marie-danielle Very smart! He is a genius.


message 3: by Stephanie (new)

Stephanie Krol Beauty!


message 4: by T. (new)

T. Mitchell These are so beautiful and imaginative!


message 5: by Normfg (new)

Normfg What a coincidence! I read this item this morning, just as I am getting into Richard Holmes's "Falling Upwards : How we took to the air" (publ.William Collins 2013 ISBN 978-0-00-738692-5). It is a gripping, wondrous book; Holmes is a brilliant story-teller. Dellschau isn't referred to, however the book is full of detail about the great experimenters and amazing characters who were captured by the magic of balloon-flight. I will definitely investigate the Dellschau book.


message 6: by Stephen (last edited May 06, 2013 04:18AM) (new)

Stephen Romano Dellschau is one America's earliest Self - Taught artists. He is the subject of a recent article in the Atlantic as well . http://www.theatlantic.com/technology...


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