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The Atonement: Its Meaning and Significance
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The Atonement: Its Meaning and Significance

4.03  ·  Rating details ·  121 Ratings  ·  17 Reviews
Why is the cross the crux of Christianity? What are the meaning and significance of the atomement? The Bible uses a host of terms to illuminate the answers to these questions: covenant, sacrifice, the Day of Atonement, Passover, redemption, reconciliation, propitiation, justification. In plain English Leon Morris explains each of these words, thus opening up for students, ...more
Paperback, 219 pages
Published May 6th 1984 by IVP Academic (first published April 6th 1984)
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Jeremiah Parker
Apr 02, 2013 rated it liked it
This book is good reading for those with an interest in atonement. It's basically a Bible study (which is not to say that Morris' theological commitments don't show themselves). This book could serve as inoculation against reductionistic/revisionist Atonement theories that sound good but don't correspond to Scripture.

I especially enjoyed the description of the Day of Atonement based largely on the Mishnah.
Stinger
May 06, 2018 rated it liked it
Shelves: christian, theology
This is certainly a worthwhile look into the various themes of the atonement. It doesn't propose an atonement theory; rather, it explores Biblical loci of the atonement.
Adam T Calvert
Jul 19, 2010 rated it liked it
Shelves: theology
I enjoyed Leon Morris' style in this book. He has a good way of relating on a popular level the different terms and phrases we find in our Bible that may otherwise not make much sense to us. He spends a chapter on each one of them:

Covenant
Sacrifice
The Day of Atonement
The Passover
Redemption
Reconciliation
Propitiation
Justification

If I could critique the book at all it would be that he mainly explained what the terms meant in the Old Testament and spent little time on how they relate to what Christ
...more
William Dicks
Nov 26, 2013 rated it really liked it
Morris shows us that the atonement is not just single faceted, but multifaceted. When we speak of justification, we are touching on one of the facets of the atonement. When we speak of propitiation, we touch on another facet.

Morris takes the following doctrines and shows how they make up a totality of the atonement:
- Covenant
- Sacrifice
- The Day of atonement
- Passover
- Redemption
- Reconciliation
- Propitiation
- Justification

By highlighting all these doctrines, Morris shows how the atoneme
...more
Ryan
Mar 10, 2011 rated it really liked it
Shelves: soteriology
Wonderful book. Morris is biblically grounded as he explains the many nuances of the cross of Christ. He examines Covenant, Sacrifice, The Day of Atonement, The Passover, Redemption, Reconciliation, Propitiation, and Justification, explaining how each of them contribute to the way we view the cross. Theological at points, it still leaves the reader with a good understanding of what Jesus did for us, thus practically affecting the way we live.
Mike
Jan 06, 2013 rated it liked it
Shelves: theology
If you wonder what lies behind the meaning of words like “redemption”, “reconciliation” and “propitiation”? If you are curious about how the Passover, Day of Atonement, and the Mosaic sacrificial system all relate to Jesus’ work on the cross then I recommend The Atonement.

This book was used as a text for a seminary class. However, it is very readable given the depth of the topic and is best read slowly (chapter at a time).
Jeff Boettcher
Jun 15, 2013 rated it really liked it
Really good breakdown of the various aspects of Christ' atonement for Christians. I especially appreciated learning more about the extra biblical context of the words that are used to describe the atonement. My only knock against it is that for a book that is written about so deep a topic, I wish it was written with more doxology.
Stefan Wyper
Feb 05, 2013 rated it really liked it
Great book on the historicity of concepts like Justification, Propitiation, Reconciliation, Redemption, etc

The style is similar to Leon Morris' other works. He is a commentator so the study of each concept is comprehensive, yet sometimes dry!

Learned a lot from it and if your willing to put the time into it, you will very much enjoy it!
Mark
Jan 30, 2010 rated it really liked it
This book contains great scholarship in very readable form. Morris gives just enough information to carefully explain the different aspects of the atonement while not becoming overly technical. It is an encouraging read and would also be helpful as a reference book.
JoonHui
Sep 21, 2014 rated it it was amazing
This work of Morris is superior in content. It provides sufficient knowledge for scholar and non-scholars. I could not have recommend any book if anyone wants to know more about the theology of atonement.
Robert Scholl
Mar 31, 2016 rated it really liked it  ·  review of another edition
Enlightening

I have been reading books suggested by my pastor and that's what lead me to this book. There is a ton here and way more than I could possibly remember but it's really aided my understanding of "sacrifice"
Bill Brown
The Theology is solid but the writing style is only fair.
Neil Hoffman
Jan 31, 2016 rated it really liked it
Really good insights on important words related to what Jesus did on the cross. Helps us to get the full biblical picture rather than simply zeroing in on just one aspect.
Talitha
Apr 11, 2013 rated it really liked it
This got a little too thorough at times. The discussion of OT sacrifice and use of terminology was especially helpful.
Justin
Mar 30, 2013 rated it really liked it
When used for teaching, I preferred this slightly over Cross of Christ (Stott), just because it's shorter and to the point.
Nathan Shaver
Jan 11, 2013 rated it really liked it
Shelves: doctrine-matters
Great!
James Wheeler
Dec 03, 2012 rated it really liked it
Fantastic book! Clear explanation of classic theological terms from the old testament. This is a kind of discussion we need for better new testament understanding of atonement.
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