Goodreads helps you keep track of books you want to read.
Start by marking “Sodomy and the Pirate Tradition: English Sea Rovers in the Seventeenth-Century Caribbean” as Want to Read:
Sodomy and the Pirate Tradition: English Sea Rovers in the Seventeenth-Century Caribbean
Enlarge cover
Rate this book
Clear rating
Open Preview

Sodomy and the Pirate Tradition: English Sea Rovers in the Seventeenth-Century Caribbean

3.71  ·  Rating details ·  185 Ratings  ·  21 Reviews

"A great . . . very interesting book."
Johnny Depp

"Burg puts historians to shame by raising extremely interesting questions that no one before had asked."
Christopher Hill in New York Review of Books

Pirates are among the most heavily romanticized and fabled characters in history. From Bluebeard to Captain Hook, they have been the subject of countless movies, books, childre

...more
Kindle Edition, Second Edition
Published (first published 1983)
More Details... edit details

Friend Reviews

To see what your friends thought of this book, please sign up.

Reader Q&A

To ask other readers questions about Sodomy and the Pirate Tradition, please sign up.

Be the first to ask a question about Sodomy and the Pirate Tradition

This book is not yet featured on Listopia. Add this book to your favorite list »

Community Reviews

(showing 1-10)
Rating details
Sort: Default
|
Filter
Liane
Jan 28, 2013 rated it really liked it  ·  review of another edition
Shelves: history
A couple of years ago, I took a History of Sexuality class. For our final project, we had to read a book from the list that my teacher gave to us. As soon I saw this book, I knew I HAD to do it. Because pirates! He assigned me my first choice then I realized I had to present to my class about pirate butt sex. That was fun.

However, this book is rather dry but Burg researched the topic well. At some points, it felt a bit like he was throwing spaghetti at the wall with his usage of sources and docu
...more
Colin Williams
Jul 19, 2013 rated it it was amazing  ·  review of another edition
Seriously, this book has everything you always wanted to know. The chapter entitled "Buccaneer Sexuality" is of course the best, but it contains so many insights, such as that fellatio is the preferred method of male homosexual expression only in America, whereas in the UK they do something referred to in the text as "genital apposition,"* possibly because circumcision is more widespread here. Did pirates engage in fellatio? "Although the continual accumulation of smegmal matter, desquamated epi ...more
Leopold Benedict
This volume investigates the homosexual pirates in 17th century England. I found this study very enlightening especially as pirates in 21st century movies are typically represented as heterosexual and in pursuit of that one beautiful pirate woman. Homosexual behaviour is usually ignored or represented in today's clichés such as in One Piece. Considering that man/boy relationships are still tabooed, a authentic representation of famous pirate's sex lives, such as Blackbeard, would be offensive to ...more
Rachel
Jul 29, 2011 rated it it was amazing
This was an excellent scholarly study of the social conditions that led men and boys to become pirates. The previous title was "Sodomy and the Perception of Evil," which is probably more apt. It's rather a shame that such a well-researched, scholarly book may be mistaken for a larkish commentary on gay pirates. The author is aware of this, and in fact many of his fellow researchers refused to be acknowledged by name, unwilling to be associated with a topic that is still controversial. What a sha ...more
Rica
Okay, I finally finished it and I have some thoughts.

This book is dated and it shows in how it handles the whole idea of homosexuality, most noticeable in that it constantly refers to "homosexuals". It attempts to make some distinction between individuals with homosexual preferences and individuals engaging in homosexual sex acts out of necessity, but it's not really succeeding in creating a nuanced definition of what the book is actually about. What bothers me more is that in both the piratica
...more
Christopher Roth
You have to love any scholarly work that contains the following methodological caveat: "The scarcity of data is due in part to the familiar problems of gathering information on homosexuality, but it is also a result of the difficulty plaguing research endeavors on Caribbean piracy. Not only was the corpse of the last potential interviewee dipped in tar and chained to a gibbet between flood marks at Wapping Stairs when George II was Kind of England, but the usual literary remnants particular to s ...more
Hannah
Nov 24, 2016 rated it liked it
Shelves: non-fiction
almost excruciatingly dated in parts, along with excessive repetition from the author and a grim amount of aligning pedophilia with consensual adult homosexuality. however, there was also a huge amount of information on an area of history i truly didn't know much about, making this a very interesting read. the book covered a lot on the factors that create a pirate and a pirate community as well as examining pirate sexuality, and was a detailed resource on the conditions in the colonies that resu ...more
Alex
Jan 04, 2011 rated it it was ok  ·  review of another edition
Shelves: research
Interesting, but marred by obvious authorial bias which meant that I couldn't find him a trustworthy guide.
Mat
May 09, 2017 rated it really liked it  ·  review of another edition
Do you remember a few years ago when a major character on the show Black Sails had a gay story line? Despite the show's many lesbian scenes, gay scenes were just too much for some fragile viewers and the creators decided to tone it down. Here are some of the actual comments from man-babies when this was going on:

'they missed up the charecter with the fucking "gay" thing'

'yep, they messed the whole show, I'm not even finish the series'

'GAY SHIT'

'Why do they feel the need to fill shows with histor
...more
Jillian
Hmmmm. This is a tough one. I'm very ambivalent about this book. It's a very weird book, which is in no small part due to its age. It was published in the 1980s, a time when LGBT and gender studies looked very different than they do today. But even with that concession, most of the arguments presented here basically come out of nowhere, and Burg seems to contradict himself too. He states that he is not trying to argue that pirates were all homosexual, but he spends a lot of time trying to convin ...more
« previous 1 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 next »
There are no discussion topics on this book yet. Be the first to start one »
  • Love Stories: Sex between Men before Homosexuality
  • Strangers: Homosexual Love in the Nineteenth Century
  • The Lesbian and Gay Studies Reader
  • The Sexual Outlaw: A Documentary
  • Words and Music: A History of Pop in the Shape of a City
  • Unlimited Intimacy: Reflections on the Subculture of Barebacking
  • The Hut Six Story: Breaking the Enigma Codes
  • Witchcraft and the Gay Counterculture
  • The Haraway Reader
  • Villains of All Nations: Atlantic Pirates in the Golden Age
  • Forbidden Nation: A History of Taiwan
  • The Eudaemonic Pie
  • Survey of Historic Costume
  • The Last Alchemist: Count Cagliostro, Master of Magic in the Age of Reason
  • Sins of the Cities of the Plain
  • Skywalking: The Life And Films of George Lucas
  • Funk: The Music, The People, and The Rhythm of The One
  • Getting Away With It
Barry Richard Burg (b. 1938) is a professor of history at Arizona State University.
More about B.R. Burg...
“The scarcity of data is due in part to the familiar problems of gathering information on homosexuality, but it is also a result of the difficulty plaguing research endeavors on Caribbean piracy. Not only was the corpse of the last potential interviewee dipped in tar and chained to a gibbet between flood marks at Wapping Stairs when George II was King of England, but the usual literary remnants particular to subjects of historical investigation were never extant for the cadre of illiterate and inarticulate sea rovers.” 0 likes
More quotes…