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America at 1750: A Social Portrait

3.63  ·  Rating details ·  128 ratings  ·  5 reviews
Demonstrates how the colonies developed into the first nation created under the influences of nationalism, modern capitalism and Protestantism.
paper, 320 pages
Published January 12th 1973 by Vintage (first published 1971)
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Tom Schulte
Oct 03, 2018 rated it really liked it
Throughout my reading life I have often dived into and been impressed with the book of Douglas R. Hofstadter. When reading about that Hofstadter it is often pointed out that he is different from this historian Hofstadter. So, I decided, why not read the "other" Hofstadter? I am glad I did. This brisk, accessible American history explores the pre-Revolutionary War American Colonial Era and the foundations laid there not only for that War but for much of what makes America unique. I find it really ...more
John Almada
Sep 01, 2012 rated it it was amazing
Everybody gets a 5 because these are my favorite books. "The laws put labor at a disadvantage, but the market was on labors side, and the market was stronger." Completely original interpretation of America. Scholarly analysis unimpeded by "conventional wisdom".
Jawad Khan
Jan 09, 2015 rated it really liked it
This is one of the list of books which I like.
Rebecca Yarros
Feb 17, 2010 rated it really liked it
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Hunter McCleary
Jun 23, 2019 rated it really liked it
Shelves: genealogy
Nice snapshot of what made Americans tick in the run-up to the Revolution. So sad that Hofstadter died after completing this, the first of three planned volumes.
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Richard Hofstadter was an American public intellectual, historian and DeWitt Clinton Professor of American History at Columbia University. In the course of his career, Hofstadter became the “iconic historian of postwar liberal consensus” whom twenty-first century scholars continue consulting, because his intellectually engaging books and essays continue to illuminate contemporary history.

His most
...more