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Under an English Heaven

3.83  ·  Rating details ·  41 ratings  ·  4 reviews
Westlake describes the British invasion of the Caribbean island of Anguilla on March 19, 1969 -- an engagement dubbed by Time as "Britain's Bay of Piglets." What was this tiny querulous democracy -- black and white petit bourgeois all -- after? This was a puzzlement to almost everyone, particularly since the first ""rebel flag"" hoisted was the Union Jack. Mainly it boiled ...more
Hardcover, 278 pages
Published 1972 by Simon and Schuster
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3.83  · 
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aPriL does feral sometimes
Reading this book about the fight of Anguilla to remain a colony of England despite England's efforts to free the Carribean island reminded me of :

https://youtu.be/kTcRRaXV-fg

with the English in the role Abbott played and Anguilla's role played by Costello.

Anguilla had 6,000 or so people, according to 'Under an English Heaven, published in 1972, of which 3,500 were children and 2,000 were women.

The island is 16 miles long, 3 miles wide. Why on Earth is this tiny backwoods place interesting? Beca
...more
Steve
Feb 13, 2011 added it
This is a non-fiction of Westlake, an author I really enjoy reading.
This is a departure by going non-fiction.
Quite the off the wall story of mismanagement, mishandling, and mishagahss of the British empire in decline and with imperialistic incompetency.

Westlake describes the British invasion of the Caribbean island of Anguilla on March 19, 1969 -- an engagement dubbed by Time as "Britain's Bay of Piglets." What was this tiny querulous democracy -- black and white petit bourgeois all -- after? Th
...more
Charlene Connors
Oct 09, 2013 rated it it was amazing
This is one of the funniest books i have read. I had been to Anguilla once, but I had been to St. Kitts many many times and I feel that
knowing something of the environment and politics of both islands
really made a difference. Truth is often funnier than fiction.
Cynthia
Dec 27, 2009 rated it it was ok
Funny, but not interesting enough for an entire book.
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Diversity in All ...: Under an English Heaven (June 2018) 5 29 Jun 16, 2018 03:11PM  
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Donald E. Westlake (1933-2008) was one of the most prolific and talented authors of American crime fiction. He began his career in the late 1950's, churning out novels for pulp houses—often writing as many as four novels a year under various pseudonyms such as Richard Stark—but soon began publishing under his own name. His most well-known characters were John Dortmunder, an unlucky thief, and a ru ...more