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The New Division of Labor: How Computers Are Creating the Next Job Market

3.79  ·  Rating details ·  38 ratings  ·  6 reviews
As the current recession ends, many workers will not be returning to the jobs they once held--those jobs are gone. In The New Division of Labor, Frank Levy and Richard Murnane show how computers are changing the employment landscape and how the right kinds of education can ease the transition to the new job market.


The book tells stories of people at work--a high-end finan
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Paperback, 174 pages
Published September 18th 2005 by Princeton University Press (first published April 12th 2004)
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Richard
Sep 26, 2015 rated it liked it
This raised some interesting ideas; however, it is a little dated. While the authors most likely intended to write a book that would stand the test of time, a few of the predictions have turned out to be wrong. The primary example would be self-driving cars. The authors hold driving up as a complex task that would be difficult to teach a computer. It is certainly a complex task; however, self-driving cars are now a reality.

There is still some value in this book; however, I would recommend only r
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Jeff
Apr 01, 2010 rated it really liked it
Shelves: education
The Division of Labor is a great articulation of the need for an expansion of the global goals of public education. Levy and Murnane argue that computers have altered our economic world, but that it does not lead to mass unemployment. Rather it leads to a hollowing out of the middle of the job market, because computers are better at running algorithms or rules-based tasks. So the jobs that we loose are the blue-collar and middle class jobs that do rules-based tasks. However, what computers can't ...more
Jysoo
Aug 24, 2014 rated it really liked it
This is another book on the issue of “men vs. machine”. Compared with the “Race Against the Machine” which discusses more theoretical framework of the issue, this book is more practical with narrower focus. The authors start with the question “what kind of tasks do computer perform better than humans?” --- rule based logic. On the other hand, humans are good at expert thinking and complex communication. The authors discuss their implications on the job market, with very interesting statistics. T ...more
Tim
Apr 28, 2008 rated it really liked it
If you want to understand the large forces shaping our dynamic labor market's evoilution, this is one of the best books you will find. Insightful but slightly on the scholarly side. It's been a while since I read this, and I recall that their policy prescriptions seemed oriented to typical government-knows-best solutions.
Shirley
Sep 13, 2011 rated it really liked it
Shelves: education
Nothing new, but nice to read through the conclusions and especially see data w.r.t. impact of technology jobs (which skills more in demand, which less in demand) and what this means for our K-12 education system. Heavier on the business cases than anticipated.
Johnny Go
Mar 15, 2016 rated it it was amazing  ·  review of another edition
I heard Richard Murnane speak in Harvard. Brilliant guy. This book helps put into perspective the impact of technology on jobs and education.
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“We are beginning to fill in the blanks about how computers are changing work. On the labor market’s demand side, the share of menial jobs has increased modestly, but the largest job growth has been in occupations requiring significant education. On the labor market’s supply side, the number of college graduates has been growing faster than the number of high school graduates and dropouts. Yet the rising wages of college graduates indicate demand is outstripping their supply. Conversely, the declining wages of male high school graduates and dropouts, despite the slow growth of these groups, indicate they will end up in jobs that no longer pay enough to support families.” 0 likes
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