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My Princess Boy

3.81  ·  Rating details ·  999 Ratings  ·  225 Reviews
My Princess Boy is a nonfiction picture book about acceptance. With words and illustrations even the youngest of children can understand, My Princess Boy tells the tale of 4-year-old boy who happily expresses his authentic self by happily dressing up in dresses, and enjoying traditional girl things such as jewelry and anything pink or sparkly. The book is from a mom's poin ...more
Paperback, 32 pages
Published 2010 by KD Talent LLC (first published 2009)
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Calista
I love books about this subject. I don't think the art is great, but I think I understand. The mother who wrote this book wanted any parent dealing with this to be able to see their child as the child in the story I think. Still, it might have been more effective to put a face on the character as it helps the reader relate to them.

Still, I love the message of support and love for a child who is a bit different. It's a message of acceptance and against bullying and in today's world, that is an im
...more
Joanna
Jan 17, 2011 rated it liked it
This is a very well-intentioned picture book about accepting gender difference in children.

The Princess Boy at the heart of the story is a little boy who likes to play dress up, wear a tiara, and twirl like a ballerina. The best thing about this book is how it treats this as a matter of fact part of life, and the way the other characters accept the Princess Boy on his own terms. Maybe that is more than enough to reasonably ask a picture to accomplish on behalf of tolerance in the world, but I s
...more
Melody
Dec 16, 2011 rated it it was ok
I picked this up because I was reminded of my own son's predilection for sparkly nail polish and glittery garments at around age 2 or 3.

This is a sweet book, but somewhat heavy-handed. It would have been so much better with illustrations of people with faces. It was hard to visualize the princess boy as a boy when he was presented as a faceless person dressed in what I reflexively think of as "girl" clothes- and while I'm sufficiently aware of certain of my prejudices to recognize this, I wonder
...more
C

I love this book - it's a love letter from Mother to Son celebrating individuality and strength of spirit and sympathizing with the heartbreak of ridicule and label of "different." I found it at the library and it really touched me. I started putting it face-out on the bookshelves and was impressed to see it disappear more than a couple times.

We had a family come in, and the little boy wanted princess stories - he loved princess stories and Dora and Angelina Ballerina. I so loved that his Mother
...more
Makayla Zimmerman
Nov 06, 2017 rated it really liked it
This review has been hidden because it contains spoilers. To view it, click here.
Katie
Nov 03, 2017 rated it it was ok
Shelves: picture-books
This book is useful as it attempts to explain gender identity issues to children and encourages them to be respectful to others. It forces children to think about their actions and consider the feelings of others.

I found this book really lacked subtlety though. It focuses very heavily on the topic which detracts from the plot itself as not much really happens.

The text deals with a very sensitive issue which is really good to see and it is important to have similar texts in the classroom. Howev
...more
Audrey
Feb 21, 2011 rated it it was ok
I don't know if there's a way to write this kind of book without being heavy-handed or didactic but I kind of hope there is, and that someone else will give it a shot.
Brittany Chlarson
This book grabbed my attention because of the title and the faceless illustration on the cover. I enjoyed this book, but it definitely was not one I would deem a favorite. I liked that this book was emphasizing the importance of individuality: the little boy was encouraged by his mother to be who he wanted to be even if that meant wearing dresses and dancing like a ballerina. I liked how the author included an older brother who had all the "traditional" masculine qualities, but the parents never ...more
Michael
The State of the Union, 2015: Girls can wear pants, but boys still can't wear dresses. When are we going to get over it, people?

I'm giving this 5 stars out of the gate because it is a travesty that there aren't other books like this. (Is this the only one?) Our household library has collected over a 1,000 children's books since my 6-year-old was born and not one of those books has a boy in a dress as normal (except this one), or two dads (although we do own And Tango Makes Three), or two moms, a
...more
Bibiana Jurado
A mother tells a true story about her son who loves wearing dresses- her "Princess Boy". She talks about her family's unwavering love for him and that he has friends of all genders. However, some people are still hesitant to accept a little boy in a dress; the overall message of the book is the importance of acceptance for others and that it's okay to be yourself.

This biography of Cheryl Kilodavis' son successfully balances acceptance of her son's preferences with those who aren't so accepting;
...more
Mehsi
It is Banned Books Week, and I am reading Challenged/Banned books. This is the first book for this week.

This book was challenged in Texas quite a lot of times due to it promoting the gay lifestyle (one of the reasons at least).

I have to say that the book was pretty great, but I was a bit tired of the repetition. My princess boy this, my princess boy that. I get it. He is a princess boy, and that is terrific, but does it need to be repeated over and over again for each part? Couldn't we have an
...more
Valerie Lurquin
May 12, 2015 rated it really liked it
Shelves: lgbtq
This is a simple story about a four year old boy named Dyson, who happens o be the authors son. He loves to dress up and dance around in sparkly pink clothing. This books shows the love and support of a family who loves him and shows him that it is ok to be himself; however, it also shows students how hurtful comments and negative actions may be to someone and their family. The author did a great job of bringing light to a sensitive subject!

The message of this story is extremely meaningful: Be o
...more
Daniele
Jun 12, 2013 rated it really liked it
The author leads us on a fanciful walk through several aspects of her princess boy's life. He likes things traditionally regarded as being feminine: dresses, the color pink, and dressing up as a princess. While his family is supportive of him, the book details how others have been intolerant. The book ends with a challenge to the reader, of the "what would you do" type.

The tension in this book, will slightly explicit, is more between the reader and the topic than within the storyline. For reader
...more
Erin Reilly-Sanders
After taking an intensive week-long class on gender, I really found the message of the text of this book to be interesting and importantly meaningful, permitting boys to explore crossing gender role boundaries that do not particularly benefit society. The male gender pronouns mixed with female actions provoke reconsideration of the strict lines between genders. However, upon closer inspective, the illustrations seemed to provide a different view of gender. The faceless figure portrayed stays com ...more
Mathew
Mar 20, 2016 rated it did not like it
Terribly illustrated and its standard of writing was just as bad. There are a few, better books out there that explore the issue of boys who want to dress up as girls or are confused about their gender identity. We do need more books like this out there and I would be concerned if people didn't want to see them in classrooms. Books like these can support focused discussion and, more importantly, allow those who feel the same way to see that they are not alone. I'd argue that even though this boo ...more
Emilie Rhoton
Nov 05, 2017 rated it liked it
This book although short it contains a powerful message which makes this book banned in certain places. While in today's world people are trying to break gender roles, but to some they still enjoy gender roles. It's hard to believe that such a short book can cause so many issues to arise that it has to be banned for some schools. This book is is about a boy who wants to dress up as anything including a princess, which is why this book is seen as such a controversial book.

Students now a days wan
...more
Kaley
Oct 25, 2017 rated it it was amazing
Shelves: ece
This review has been hidden because it contains spoilers. To view it, click here.
Maria A
Nov 22, 2017 rated it it was amazing
Shelves: lgbtq
I love this book, It is voiced by the child's mother. She explains all the things that her little boys enjoys. We have these social norms in place that dictate what interest young children should have, and I don't agree with these social constructs. as a society, we are quick to embrace a girl who falls into this "tomboy" category.
We happily label ourselves that growing up yet our boys who were brave enough to break these absurd social norms don't have the same freedom or safety. I love this b
...more
Sophia Martin
Oct 07, 2012 rated it did not like it
This non-fiction children's book is about a young boy who likes to dress in dresses and likes "girly" things. Cheryl Kilodavis, the author, writes this story based on first hand knowledge. She wrote the story about her young son. She chose to write this book to increase awareness and promote acceptance of young princess boys everywhere. Suzanne DeSimone's pictures are simple and go great with the text. It is good that she did not put an actual face to the Princess Boy; it shows that he can repre ...more
Amanda
Feb 10, 2012 rated it liked it  ·  review of another edition
Shelves: glbtq
My Princess Boy is a picture book with a compassionate message. It is the story of a nameless, faceless boy who likes wearing dresses and all things princess. His mother tells us that people have both made fun of him and accepted him as the person he is. She then asks the audience to consider how they would interact with a Princess Boy, and asks us to consider her Princess Boy as our own Princess Boy. This is an emotionally onerous picture book, but perfect for sparking discussions about gender ...more
Sam Bloom
Jan 27, 2011 rated it liked it
Boy, I really wanted to like this book, and I will say that I found Kilodavis's text to be uniformly excellent. Sadly, I can't say the same for the illustrations. I can certainly understand why DeSimone would choose to make her characters faceless, as this book really deals with seeing beyond what's on the surface and accepting people for who they are. But the featureless face coupled with the strangely shaped head and claw-like hands makes the illustrations actually creepy, and I expect they'll ...more
Jennifer Pym
Feb 19, 2014 rated it liked it
I have a few issues with this book. The faceless characters are creepy, the art isn't very inviting and its really more about cross dressing than true gender identity.

Not that there isn't a need for books that challenge traditional gender roles, but what does this book add? Ferdinand, Goblinheart, The Paperbag Princess, and Oliver Button is a Sissy are great for that and then some.

Still, there are so few books that counter the negative messages about gender roles and it does do that.
Earl
Mar 01, 2017 rated it liked it  ·  review of another edition
Shelves: lgbtq
A sweet story of a family who’s accepting of their Princess Boy. A much needed read for those who don’t conform to society’s ideas of what’s normal. How I wish that we’re at a time that people are truly accepting of one another despite our differences. Until then, and this book does mention that not everyone is as understanding, hopefully this book will be a serve as a message of “I see you. I love you for who you are.” Based on the author's experiences.
Heather
Aug 26, 2011 rated it liked it
Shelves: 2011-read, glbt, children
A really great book on tolerance/acceptance of others who are different. It's a good book to open up lines of discussions with children. Though, the illustrations weren't to my liking. I'm really glad Kilodavis shares her and her son's story.
Kirsten Lansberry
Nov 13, 2014 rated it really liked it
I like this book because it asks the reader to make a decision about how he or she will react to a transgender person. Hopefully the spirit of the book will remain with the reader long after they've forgotten about the Princess Boy.
Randie D. Camp, M.S.
A mom shares what life is like with her princess boy...a boy who enjoys pink and dresses. Others laugh at him but his family accepts and loves him. The books asks readers how they would react to a princess boy, promoting acceptance.
Rashika (is tired)
We need many more picture books like this in the real world. All the princess boys in the world deserve to have their voice heard :)
Elena
Oct 05, 2017 rated it really liked it
A lovely book about a boy who likes to wear dresses and sparkly, and sparkly accessories.

A great tool to use in the class when talking about acceptance and unconditional friendship.
Kelly Risinger
very good show kindness and not bullying
Mariana
I’m not a fan of her maintaining the pronoun “he” while talking about her “princess boy”. Of course the boy could simply like dresses and not be transgendered.
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