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Le Maître du Haut Château

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3.65  ·  Rating details ·  117,970 Ratings  ·  8,304 Reviews
1948, fin de la Seconde Guerre mondiale et capitulation des Alliés. Vingt ans plus tard. dans les Etats-Pacifiques d'Amérique sous domination nippone, la vie a repris son cours. L'occupant a apporté avec lui sa philosophie et son art de vivre. A San Francisco, le Yi King, ou Livre des mutations, est devenu un guide spirituel pour de nombreux Américains, tel Robert Chidan, ...more
Mass Market Paperback, 320 pages
Published December 1998 by J'ai Lu (first published 1962)
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tyler I think this is to further convey the "Japanization" of society in the PSA. The choppiest sentences are when the Japanese characters are speaking or…moreI think this is to further convey the "Japanization" of society in the PSA. The choppiest sentences are when the Japanese characters are speaking or thinking to themselves, but some of the the white characters on the West Coast also speak in a sort of streamlined English to a lesser extent. I think this is meant to portray how the new ruling class has affected nearly every facet of American life.(less)
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Ken-ichi
Oct 20, 2012 rated it really liked it  ·  review of another edition
On Wednesday I found myself at a party (an occurrence itself worthy of remark) at which everyone wore "I'm currently reading..." stickers, so I had several opportunities to explain why I was loving The Man in the High Castle. One such conversation went like this:

"So what's that about?"
"Well, it's scifi. Or rather speculative fiction."
"Er, hm. No. I don't do scifi."
"But it's got Nazis!"
"Oh my god I love Nazis!"

Another conversation involved me explaining to a white guy how interesting I (a half-Ja
...more
Manny
US_flag_swastika_edited

[Original review, Feb 22 2016]

DISCLAIMER: It would evidently be irresponsible to call Donald Trump a Nazi merely on the strength of a recent speech in which he suggested it would be desirable to shoot Muslims using bullets dipped in pig's blood. A more plausible interpretation is that this is no more than the result of dispassionately calculating that the upside in terms of increasing his attractiveness to the ignorant racist demographic is larger than the downside in terms of decreasing his app
...more
Emily May
3.5
Scientifically and politically, this is absolute genius. The way Philip K. Dick masterfully rewrites history and expertly portrays this alternate United States is quite incredible and I can easily see why the guy has such a huge following. That being said, this novel is what I would call "hard sci-fi", and though it is undeniably clever, I think what it lacks is a human touch. I found it hard to care about any of the mish-mash of characters, which for me means that I ultimately found it hard
...more
Alejandro
Thank God, this is fiction, at least in our dimension!


WELCOME TO 1962

It is impossible that ours is the only world; there must be world after world unseen by us, in some region or dimension that we simply do not perceive.

This book is a frightening glimpse of how our world could been if the Axis Powers would have won the World War II.

The Nazi Germany and the Imperial Japan won and they divided the planet between them. Even the United States is now divided with the East Coast dominated by Na
...more
Glenn Russell
Jun 07, 2015 rated it it was amazing  ·  review of another edition


Fans of Philip K. Dick and science fiction might be underwhelmed by The Man in the High Castle since, other than passing mention of cross- continent rocket-ship travel and a German exploration of Mars, there really isn’t any science or signature PKD craziness or large-scale action; rather, Dick’s 1962 book is alternative history, the aftermath in the United States after Germany and Japan win World War II and a novel of ideas.

There are a number of crisscrossing plots, colorful main characters, a
...more
D. B.
Oct 31, 2008 rated it it was ok  ·  review of another edition
Recommends it for: Harry Turtledove fans, WWII geeks
High-concept, low return what-if alternate history. The idea is interesting, if a little tired: what if the Axis won World War II and divvied up the world between Nazi Germany and Imperial Japan? The answer is, not much, apparently. This new world order only really serves as a backdrop for Dick's slightly skewed storytelling, which jumps between the more interesting plot of a shadow conspiracy to nuke Japan, and a painfully tiresome tale of modern-day antiquing. Somewhere else in there is a poin ...more
Jeffrey Keeten
“They want to be the agents, not the victims, of history. They identify with God's power and believe they are godlike. That is their basic madness. They are overcome by some archtype; their egos have expanded psychotically so that they cannot tell where they begin and the godhead leaves off. It is not hubris, not pride; it is inflation of the ego to its ultimate — confusion between him who worships and that which is worshiped. Man has not eaten God; God has eaten man.”

 photo 56b1f27b-cbcb-43dc-a465-ba7177d0a14a_zpsstiaqwmn.png

If Franklin Delano Roosev
...more
Michael Finocchiaro
Philip K Dick was certainly a brilliant man and a gifted writer. His imagined dystopia of a world split between the victorious Reich and Imperial Japan is chilling and realistic. Ok, perhaps colonisation of Mars in 1962 is a bit of a stretch, but the depiction of San Francisco under the Japanese administration was excellent. His characters were vivid and lifelike. His villain was somewhat predicable, but still a fascinating one.
The dystopia he describes - particularly the horrors of unbridled f
...more
Megan Baxter
Jun 27, 2012 rated it it was amazing  ·  review of another edition
I think this book broke my brain.

I mean, it's so many things tied up in a slim little volume - an alt-history "what if Germany and Japan had won the Second World War," a meditation on the inability to ever accurately try to reconstruct what-might-have-beens, one of the most interesting literary experiments I've ever read, a look at chance and fate in how the world unfolds, and a book that can definitely bend your sense of reality.

Note: The rest of this review has been withdrawn due to the recent
...more
Joe Valdez
My preparedness for the regime change taking place in the United States--with elements of the Electoral College, the Kremlin and the FBI helping to install a failed business promoter who the majority of American voters did not support in the election--continues with The Man In the High Castle, the Hugo Award winning novel by Philip K. Dick published in 1962. Dick's sheer output and high concept hooks that can be reduced to three words--"Axis Won WWII"--have proved irresistible to film and televi ...more
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Philip K. Dick was born in Chicago in 1928 and lived most of his life in California. In 1952, he began writing professionally and proceeded to write numerous novels and short-story collections. He won the Hugo Award for the best novel in 1962 for The Man in the High Castle and the John W. Campbell Memorial Award for best novel of the year in 1974 for Flow My Tears, the Policeman Said. Philip K. Di ...more
More about Philip K. Dick...
“A weird time in which we are alive. We can travel anywhere we want, even to other planets. And for what? To sit day after day, declining in morale and hope.” 311 likes
“Truth, she thought. As terrible as death. But harder to find.” 261 likes
More quotes…