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Divins Secrets Des Petits (Ya Yas #1)

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3.8  ·  Rating details ·  477,650 Ratings  ·  3,935 Reviews
When Siddalee Walker, oldest daughter of Vivi Abbott Walker, Ya-Ya extraordinaire, is interviewed in the New York Times about a hit play she's directed, her mother gets described as a "tap-dancing child abuser." Enraged, Vivi disowns Sidda. Devastated, Sidda begs forgiveness, and postpones her upcoming wedding. All looks bleak until the Ya-Yas step in and convince Vivi to ...more
Paperback, 471 pages
Published February 1st 2000 by Pocket (FR) (first published 1996)
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Rose De I read it at 12 and liked it a lot (I'm 29 now), but I was also allowed to read more mature themes than I would ever let my children read about.
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Traci
Apr 03, 2008 rated it really liked it  ·  review of another edition
Recommends it for: imperfect mothers and daughters
Recommended to Traci by: almost everyone
When I was pregnant with my oldest child, a girl, I had a dream. In my dream, I was in the hospital, postpartum, holding not the one child I knew that I had been pregnant with . . . but two children. Both girls. One of my baby girls was quiet, observant, peaceful. She had big, open eyes that reflected her big, open heart. The other child was physically larger than the other baby and it's complete opposite. Ugly, angry, needy. I sat there holding both babies in their swaddling clothes while the o ...more
E
Oct 05, 2007 rated it did not like it  ·  review of another edition
Shelves: novels
Rebecca Wells can think up a few succulent stories, but her writing is absolute fast-food. It left me depressed to think that women are encouraged to read so-called "chick lit" on the basis that they only need a few sentimental tales about love, friendship, and/or family to satisfy them, no matter how infantile the writing style or half-baked the arguments.

(view spoiler)
...more
Debbie Petersen
Jul 13, 2008 rated it did not like it  ·  review of another edition
Recommends it for: People who do not read books but would like to think they read one
Shelves: absolute-drek
I think Vivi WAS a tap-dancing child abuser. Any discussion of this fact ends at the "being whipped with the belt" scene. Vivi had no right to be enraged when this fact comes to light--she should have been embarrassed, yes. Her daughter arguably should not have revealed this dirty laundry but should have worked it through with her mother privately.

According to this book, a scrapbook of silly adventures with Vivi's zany friends makes that behavior forgivable...not an apology or explanation from V
...more
Saleh MoonWalker
Onvan : Divine Secrets of the Ya-Ya Sisterhood - Nevisande : Rebecca Wells - ISBN : 006075995X - ISBN13 : 9780060759957 - Dar 383 Safhe - Saal e Chap : 1996
Eva
Oct 08, 2007 rated it liked it  ·  review of another edition
Recommends it for: anyone who thinks Steel Magnolias is the best movie EVER
I am so tired of this sort of storyline. A group of Southern women who form a timeless bond of woman-ness and Southern-ness and triumph in the face of all hardship because they are delicate as blossoms yet strong and fierce.
That said, when entering a genre so well-covered and sticky sweet, one must do something to make one's work stand out. I believe Rebecca Wells does an above-average job at this, and her book was a fun and easy read. It was hardly ground-breaking, nor did I find it moving, an
...more
Jennifer
Jul 14, 2008 rated it it was ok  ·  review of another edition
I'm having a hard time deciding if I liked this book or not. On the surface, not so much. About 30 pages in, I wasn't sure if I was going to make it through, or if I was going to go insane if I saw the word "Ya-Ya" one more time.

There were some things that I liked about it. Friendship that endures, closer than blood. Knowing there's always someone there in your corner, and they've been there your whole life. Daughters learning that Mom had a life before she became a Mother, and has a separate id
...more
Cheri
Jul 05, 2007 rated it did not like it  ·  review of another edition
Shelves: ick
Seriously not my cup of tea. Cutsey language, sentimentality run amok, and a deep sense of nostalgia for times that, well, I couldn't possibly feel nostalgic for. I'm not sure how an abusive mother is supposed to be funny or colorful, nor how transferring your disfunction onto you children is to be held up like a badge of honor. Maybe I needed to have crazy parents to understand it.
Deb
Aug 29, 2007 rated it did not like it  ·  review of another edition
Shelves: bookclub, fiction
When the whole Ya-Ya craze was going on, my book club decided we'd better read it to see what all the fuss was about. In the end, we had to take a vote ("ya-ya" if you liked it; "no-no" if you didn't). I fell into the "no-no" group.
I found it disturbing that hordes of women were flocking to this book that is really about completely dysfunctional families and marriages and a really unhealthy attachment to friends from the past. It made me wonder what's going on with women that this kind of co-de
...more
Dixie Diamond
Dec 29, 2008 rated it did not like it  ·  review of another edition
Recommends it for: emphatically, NOBODY.
This review has been hidden because it contains spoilers. To view it, click here.
Brandy (aka Marsden)
My mother and her Ya-Ya’s were called the sisters of Beta Sigma Phi sorority in Charleston S.C. I grew up on the marshes watching them swing dance, shuck oysters and throwing what always seemed like a never ending festival that celebrated life.

They did community work and supported the local theatre, but mostly they just had a good time. I grew up in the whirlwind of color and laughter that now seems only like a distant dream. Momma passed 18 years ago and I don’t think I will ever be the same.
...more
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Rebecca Wells was born and raised in Alexandria, Louisiana. “I grew up,” she says, “in the fertile world of story-telling, filled with flamboyance, flirting, futility, and fear.” Surrounded by Louisiana raconteurs, a large extended family, and Our Lady of Prompt Succor’s Parish, Rebecca’s imagination was stimulated at every turn. Early on, she fell in love with thinking up and acting in plays for ...more
More about Rebecca Wells...

Other Books in the Series

Ya Yas (3 books)
  • Little Altars Everywhere
  • Ya Yas in Bloom
“It’s life. You don’t figure it out. You just climb up on the beast and ride.” 209 likes
“I try to believe," she said, "that God doesn't give you more than one little piece of the story at once. You know, the story of your life. Otherwise your heart would crack wider than you could handle. He only cracks it enough so you can still walk, like someone wearing a cast. But you've still got a crack running up your side, big enough for a sapling to grow out of. Only no one sees it. Nobody sees it. Everybody thinks you're one whole piece, and so they treat you maybe not so gentle as they could see that crack.” 144 likes
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