Goodreads helps you keep track of books you want to read.
Start by marking “Theological Incorrectness: Why Religious People Believe What They Shouldn't” as Want to Read:
Theological Incorrectness: Why Religious People Believe What They Shouldn't
Enlarge cover
Rate this book
Clear rating
Open Preview

Theological Incorrectness: Why Religious People Believe What They Shouldn't

3.78  ·  Rating details ·  54 ratings  ·  5 reviews
"Ask two religious people one question, and you'll get three answers!"
Why do religious people believe what they shouldn't--not what others think they shouldn't believe, but things that don't accord with their own avowed religious beliefs? This engaging book explores this puzzling feature of human behavior.
D. Jason Slone terms this phenomenon "theological incorrectness." He
...more
Hardcover, 168 pages
Published March 1st 2004 by Oxford University Press, USA (first published January 1st 2004)
More Details... edit details

Friend Reviews

To see what your friends thought of this book, please sign up.

Reader Q&A

To ask other readers questions about Theological Incorrectness, please sign up.

Be the first to ask a question about Theological Incorrectness

Community Reviews

Showing 1-30
Rating details
Sort: Default
|
Filter
Nasrin Sheila
May 24, 2017 rated it liked it
Some interesting thoughts, , , really, human are so complex and can have so many contradictory thoughts, , , I didn't like some parts of the beginning that much, ending was better, , , overall it was okay, but it could be better
Gwern
Sep 30, 2012 rated it liked it

(56k words; 1.5 hours) A short book on some of the possible psychological predispositions to religious thinking as indicated by intuitive thinking. He diagnoses overactive theories of mind; teleological thinking; intuitive ontologies of what kind of people and things there are in the world; cognitive biases related to the birthday paradox, gambler's fallacy, and confirmation bias, as major causes of religious thinking.

I was mostly disappointed by this naturalistic account; Slone spends a complet
...more
Diane
Feb 05, 2008 marked it as to-read  ·  review of another edition
Recommended by a minister friend, who said it's "A great explanation and challenge to think more logically and critically about God, religion, tradition, and doctrine and to asses the understanding implicit in everything."
Benjamin
Jul 19, 2010 rated it it was amazing
Recommends it for: Secularists, Biblical scholars, religious studies students.
Shelves: read-2010-08
A really incisive look at the reason for religious doctrine and religious practice often being two completely different things. Compelling and well-researched, Slone's book is a valuable addition to any library of religious studies.
Onyango Makagutu
Mar 13, 2013 rated it really liked it  ·  review of another edition
Loved it
Atheists
rated it it was amazing
Dec 27, 2011
Marisa
rated it it was amazing
Apr 07, 2008
Usfromdk
rated it liked it
Apr 22, 2013
Dan Ust
rated it really liked it
Dec 08, 2015
Kin Easter
rated it liked it
Jan 15, 2013
Jakob Bork
rated it it was ok
Oct 27, 2015
Bryon Peterson
rated it it was ok
May 27, 2018
Dan
rated it really liked it
Aug 28, 2015
Lukas
rated it really liked it
Jun 02, 2013
Robert Castillo
rated it liked it
Dec 04, 2013
Razib Khan
rated it it was amazing
Apr 07, 2013
Razib Khan
rated it really liked it
Dec 04, 2014
Teemu Taira
rated it liked it
Jan 28, 2017
Joshua
rated it really liked it
Aug 23, 2012
Adam Gilreath
rated it it was amazing
Nov 16, 2012
Hyperion
rated it it was amazing
Jan 09, 2017
Pat
rated it liked it
Apr 07, 2013
Andy
rated it really liked it
May 30, 2016
Kaela Schreck
rated it really liked it
Dec 04, 2014
Daniel
rated it it was amazing
Jun 14, 2018
Alex Ishkin
rated it it was amazing
Oct 11, 2016
B.t. Newberg
rated it it was amazing
Nov 21, 2011
Juan Pablo Delgado
rated it really liked it
Jan 05, 2013
Jay
rated it it was ok
May 09, 2018
David Gillespie
rated it liked it
Dec 22, 2017
« previous 1 next »
There are no discussion topics on this book yet. Be the first to start one »
“... we cannot simply presume that we know instinctively why people do what they do no matter how emotionally satisfying that may be, because humans are often generally unaware of the reasons for their thoughts and actions in the first place. […] In most cases, our thoughts and actions simply make sense at the time.” 0 likes
More quotes…