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A Theology of Christian Counseling: More Than Redemption

4.13  ·  Rating details ·  252 ratings  ·  22 reviews
A Theology of Christian Counseling connects biblical doctrine with practical living. Salvation, that central concern of Protestant theology, is often too narrowly defined. It is thought of as “being saved from the consequences of sin.” But God is doing much more. He is making something new out of the old sinful nature. He is, in Christ, making new creatures. “No counseling ...more
Paperback, 352 pages
Published June 15th 1986 by Zondervan
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Zack
Jan 17, 2020 rated it it was ok
There are some real gems in this work, but the whole suffers from imprecise theological writing, “word study syndrome,” and imbalance. At too many points, he presses the need for more writing on various subjects from a “biblical/nouthetic counseling” perspective, and he is overly defensive against his (unworthy) critics. The most glaring problem is that there is only one place in the whole book that I would characterize as distinctively trinitarian. The appendix on counseling unbelievers is help ...more
Bruce
May 01, 2012 rated it really liked it
Shelves: ministry
Competent to Counsel, The Christian Counselor's Manual and A Theology of Christian Counseling were instrumental in my journey toward becoming a biblical counselor. This is the theological why behind the what of counseling. ...more
Natalie
Jan 26, 2013 rated it liked it
Shelves: christian-living
I really enjoyed the subject matter of this book and found it very enlightening. What annoyed me the most was the fact that Adams kept inserting random phrases into his writing. Although most of the stuff he inserted was true, it was not necessary to the book and made it harder to read.
Bo Cogbill
Jan 07, 2020 rated it really liked it  ·  review of another edition
Good Introduction to How Systematics Informs Counseling

For those wondering if Theology has anything to contribute to counseling, this is a great intro. Adams does a good job covering the basics of systematics and showing how they can and should inform every counseling situation.

All suffering is from sin, even if it's only Adam's (first man, not Jay), and as such the gospel is the only news that can bring about healing.

Adams begins with the Doctrine of God, moves into the Doctrine of Man, Salva
...more
James Fields
Oct 10, 2017 rated it it was amazing
When I was in Bible college I had to read a variety of systematic theologies throughout my various classes. I read Basic Theology by Charles C. Ryrie, Systematic Theology by Wayne Grudem, and Understanding Christian Theology by Swindoll and Zuch.

There are three main problems all systematic theologies face: 1) in their zeal for getting theology right they can often forget or neglect to make it practical for the every day Christian, 2) they tend to be very lengthy, and 3) they excel in using large
...more
Natalie Weber
Jan 15, 2020 rated it really liked it
To begin our pursuit toward certification as biblical counselors, my husband and I selected this title from a book list provided for the first phase of our study. The author lays out a defense for biblical counseling, as opposed to either secular or integrationist counseling, and he gives an overview of how various biblical doctrines relate to counseling practices. He deals with the doctrine of God, of man, of sin, of salvation, and more. Although his writing is unapologetically dogmatic and at ...more
Audrey Falck
Jun 07, 2020 rated it liked it
I was disappointed by this book which is somewhat foundational to biblical counseling. First, it is not printed in an appealing way as all the text is packed on the page. Second, the author spends too much time focusing on what he is against, rather than showing what he is for. That makes for a laborious read.
I was particularly interested in the section on suffering which was super short and unsatisfying. If you are serious about biblical counseling, I would still recommend this as it does have
...more
Beth Peninger
Originally I gave this title 4 stars. I am revising my stars to zero.

The reason I am doing so is that since reading this title, several things about my faith journey and expression have changed and I no longer subscribe to evangelical ideologies.

Additionally, I was trained to be a lay counselor using this bible-based (only) method and I have first-hand experience as a counselor and counselee that this method does more harm than healing, promotes toxicity, enables inequality between women and men
...more
Mark
Sep 02, 2019 rated it it was amazing
For a book written almost 40 years ago, this book is still relevant for applying God's Word to real life situations. Believing that God has given us the Bible to help us understand our thoughts and desires and lead us to redemption, this book helps you apply Scripture to real life problems. A key take away, is that true heart change only comes from God; any other change is a work of the flesh, no matter how effective. ...more
Lisa Rice
This book should be in each Christian’s home. Adams teaches through foundational Christian doctrine, like forgiveness, which passively disciples each reader in an age where “ignorance is bliss.” It would be best read with a small group in your local church where the Christian life could be walked out together.
Leah
Sep 01, 2020 rated it really liked it
This is a really, thorough book that explores various parts of the christian faith and practical examples of how to help counsel. Many thoughts were extremely helpful including work, forgiveness, and interactions within the church.
He can tend to spend lots of time to refute secular theorists but he also gives examples of situations to counsel which I find, extremely helpful
Bledar
Jul 14, 2017 rated it really liked it
The book is a cut between a book of theology and counseling. It is more in terms of how theology makes sense in the context of counseling.
Daniel
May 23, 2019 rated it it was amazing
Pretty good. Worth reading again.
TJ
Jul 10, 2020 rated it it was amazing
In many ways, this book can be seen as a handbook that addresses the many different facets pertaining to biblical counseling. It is a bit of a heavier read, but it is incredibly resourceful for those who put the time into reading it. Given how comprehensive it is, it is hard to provide any particular quote that would do this book justice (but I gave one anyway). If you are serious about becoming a better biblical counselor (whether professionally or informally), I strongly recommend this book.

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...more
Debbie
Mar 16, 2016 rated it really liked it
Shelves: discipleship
An excellent manual on the biblical, theological principles of using the scriptures and the power of God's Spirit to counsel. It will give church workers and Christians interested in counselling their brothers and sisters the confidence that, with sufficient Bible study on their part and the power of the Spirit working in them, they will be able to effectively counsel others. When you have read this book, you will desire to read other counseling books by Jay Adams. ...more
Butch
Feb 26, 2013 rated it really liked it
Shelves: on-my-kindle
A very practical look at how good theology can provide a strong underpinning to the process of helping others with their problems. In the process, as with all these books, I found much practical help for me and my problems. Not difficult to read at all.
Emily
Jan 26, 2014 rated it it was amazing
Shelves: counseling
Love his down to earth folksy style as if he is speaking right to me. These reference books will be immeasurable assistance to me in the coming years.
Cindy
Oct 04, 2016 rated it it was amazing
Great book and very useful. I just forgot to mark it read
Amy Hornek
May 01, 2013 rated it really liked it
Puts theology in simpler terms and informs the counselor how that theology will be used in counsel.
David
Jun 08, 2011 rated it really liked it
Valuable reference, in many parts turning conventional thinking on its head.
Adam Johnson
Apr 02, 2013 rated it it was amazing
Jay Adams has an ability through the wisdom of the Holy Spirit to make the Scriptures very practically apply to our lives. It will greatly benefit you to read this book.
Mari
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Nov 27, 2019
julie
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Jun 01, 2014
Eunji
rated it it was amazing
Sep 03, 2020
Elizabeth Davis
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Jun 10, 2017
Stephen Leckvold
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Jan 08, 2015
Nate Claiborne
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Dec 23, 2012
Michael Keating
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Nov 11, 2013
Stephen Mccollum
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Feb 03, 2013
Lew Jessup
rated it it was amazing
Apr 18, 2019
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Jay Edward Adams is a Reformed Christian author. He has written over 100 books and these have been published in sixteen languages.
He received a Bachelor of Divinity from Reformed Episcopal Seminary, a Bachelor of Arts in Classics from Johns Hopkins University,a Masters in Sacred Theology from Temple University, and a PhD in Speech from the University of Missouri.
Adams' book Competent to Counsel l
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  Kerine Wint is a software engineering graduate with more love for books than for computers. As an avid reader, writer, and fan of all things...
14 likes · 8 comments
“Notice, again, it is not what one does that saves him—when it is judged, the tree is already a good tree—that’s why it bears good fruit (its fruit-bearing doesn’t make it a good tree). One’s works identify him as a good tree, wheat, a sheep, a Christian. Conversely, the bad tree, goat, tare and the unsaved man (like a child) is also “known by his doings” (Prov. 20:11). See Romans 2:6-8 in the light of this principle.” 1 likes
“Man was created as a being whose very existence is derived from and dependent upon a Creator whom he must acknowledge as such and from whom he must obtain wisdom and knowledge through revelation. The purpose and meaning of his life, as well as his very existence, is derived and dependent. He can find none of this in himself. Man is not autonomous.” 1 likes
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