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The Lysander Spooner Reader

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4.58  ·  Rating details ·  66 ratings  ·  4 reviews
Lawyer, abolitionist, radical; Spooner was one of the most fascinating figures in American history and a champion of individualism. This selection includes "Vices Are Not Crimes," "Natural Law," "Trial by Jury," "No Treason, the Constitution of No Authority," "Letter to Thomas Bayard," and Benjamin Tucker's eulogy.
Paperback, 343 pages
Published May 1st 1992 by Fox & Wilkes
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Scriptor Ignotus
Nov 27, 2013 rated it liked it
Shelves: politics, philosophy
Lysander Spooner is one of the preeminent figures in American anarchism. He is often cited by right-wing American libertarians as a major influence - although his membership in the First International might suggest that his views on the "free market", are more ambiguous than they appear on the surface. This collection of his work contains the essays, "Natural Law", "Vices are not Crimes", "No Treason", "Letter to Thomas F. Bayard", and "Trial by Jury".

As an individualist anarchist, Spooner's ba
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Denny Hunt
Feb 15, 2019 rated it it was amazing
A good tonic for those overly reverent of the US Constitution and other fallacies of the state.
David Soucie
Jul 24, 2014 rated it it was amazing
If you are any form is statist (lover of government), if you haven't heard of this man or never read his thoughts, you are sorely at a loss. Lysander Spooner is held by many has the farther of modern anarchism.
Thinker1776
I wish Lysander Spooner could write about today's events. I re-read this book regularly.
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Lysander Spooner was an American individualist anarchist, entrepreneur, political philosopher, abolitionist, supporter of the labor movement, and legal theorist of the nineteenth century. He is also known for competing with the U.S. Post Office with his American Letter Mail Company, which was forced out of business by the United States government. He has been identified by some contemporary writer ...more
“Man, no doubt, owes many other moral duties to his fellow men; such as to feed the hungry, clothe the naked, shelter the homeless, care for the sick, protect the defenceless, assist the weak, and enlighten the ignorant. But these are simply moral duties, of which each man must be his own judge, in each particular case, as to whether, and how, and how far, he can, or will, perform them. But of his legal duty—that is, of his duty to live honestly towards his fellow men—his fellow men not only may judge, but, for their own protection, must judge. And, if need be, they may rightfully compel him to perform it. They may do this, acting singly, or in concert. They may do it on the instant, as the necessity arises, or deliberately and systematically, if they prefer to do so, and the exigency will admit of it.” 1 likes
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