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The Best Schools: How Human Development Research Should Inform Educational Practice
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The Best Schools: How Human Development Research Should Inform Educational Practice

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3.88  ·  Rating details ·  41 Ratings  ·  12 Reviews
Educators, politicians, parents, and even students are consumed with speaking the language of academic achievement. Yet something is missing in the current focus on accountability, standardized testing, and adequate yearly progress. If schools continue to focus the conversation on rigor and accountability and ignore more human elements of education, many students may miss ...more
Paperback, 182 pages
Published January 8th 2007 by Association for Supervision & Curriculum Development (first published November 1st 2006)
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Arlini
Sep 17, 2014 rated it really liked it
Dalam buku ini Thomas Armstrong – yang telah lebih dulu dikenal melalui buku Multiple Intelligences in the Classroom (terjemahan dalam Bahasa Indonesia Sekolah Para Juara) - membandingkan antara dua pandangan (diskursus) dalam dunia pendidikan formal, yaitu pandangan yang berorientasi pada pencapaian akademik (academic achievement discourse) dan pandangan yang berorientasi pada perkembangan manusia (human development discourse).
Academic achievement discourse adalah pilihan yang jamak diterapkan
...more
Tracie
Dec 02, 2016 rated it really liked it
3.5

I read this for my school reform class. I felt that Armstrong had many good ideas. For instance, I agreed that we should put more emphasis on Human Development (including character development) and how to be a good citizen. I also liked some of his ideas on how children should learn at each stage; I particularly liked his middle and high school ideas.

However, I also found Armstrong to be very arbitrary. His entire stance was very black and white and left little wiggle room. To him, it seemed
...more
Mandabplus3
May 23, 2015 rated it liked it
A mixed bag book. The ideas on high school were fabulous, basically echoing my ideas that it is now redundant, that I'd doesn't prepare students well for further study and doesn't prepare them we'll for real life either. The middle school section is not too bad, showing a focus on connecting learning to the real world and allowing middle schoolers more hands on learning. Some wonderful quotes in this section. It's the early years section that had the stars deducted from it. This is one of those ...more
Tracey
Mar 24, 2014 rated it really liked it
I found this book to be very informative. The author points out the many practices that have positive and negative effects on student learning, testing, rigor and standards, and how we leave the importance of growing up out of the educational system. After reading this book, I want to start my own school, now!
Mr. B
Oct 29, 2007 rated it really liked it
Recommends it for: All teachers, administrators
A powerful critique of our current education discourse that is dominated by talk of academic acheivement (as relating to testing and test scores).
Armstrong effectively outlines a case to refocus our language as educators back to the issues/values that really matter.
Renay
Oct 05, 2008 rated it really liked it
Great overview that illustrates how schools should be organized based on the developmental needs of the learner.
Matthew Quinton
May 03, 2009 rated it it was amazing
If you have children in public school READ THIS BOOK.
Beth
Jun 25, 2012 rated it it was ok
meh.
Shruti
Jan 07, 2017 rated it it was amazing
A must read for all educators.
Jeanie Phillips
Jan 17, 2017 rated it it was amazing
This is an excellent primer on human development discourse in schools: the what, the why, the how.
Shadn
Oct 05, 2013 rated it it was amazing
everything for school
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Thomas Armstrong, Ph.D. is the author of sixteen books including his latest, The Power of the Adolescent Brain: Strategies for Teaching Middle and High School Students.

His other books include, Neurodiversity in the Classroom: Strategies to Help Students with Special Needs Succeed in School and Life, The Power of Neurodiversity: Unleashing the Advantages of Your Differently Wired Brain, The Human
...more
More about Thomas Armstrong...
“These are difficult times for educators who believe that learning is worth pursuing for its own sake and that the chief purpose of school is the nurturing of students as whole human beings.” 0 likes
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