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The Wimp Factor: Gender Gaps, Holy Wars, and the Politics of Anxious Masculinity
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The Wimp Factor: Gender Gaps, Holy Wars, and the Politics of Anxious Masculinity

3.69  ·  Rating details ·  59 Ratings  ·  8 Reviews
A landmark exploration of how male anxiety has come to define our political culture
What is the link between wimp factors, gender gaps, and holy wars--three recognizable political phenomena of the twenty-first century? In this eye-opening book on how male anxiety has come to shape political thinking and behavior, Dr. Stephen Ducat argues that there is a direct association
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Hardcover, 304 pages
Published September 9th 2004 by Beacon Press
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Adrian
Nov 07, 2013 rated it liked it
A bit dated - Bush-focused - but this book changed my views, even as a pretty leftist queer guy. The connection between (supposed/cultural) masculinity and conservatism deserved to be explored, and read about, in depth.
Drew
Sep 02, 2008 rated it did not like it
This is exactly the kind of gender-based social criticism that I hate: take a bunch of Lefty truisms and "prove" them through psychoanalytic theory.
Amy
Jan 16, 2009 rated it liked it  ·  review of another edition
Shelves: academic
It's a good read, although a little too "psycho babble" at times. Basically, Ducat's argument is that the Republican party and conservativism have been cast as masculine (the party and ideology of "real men") as opposed to the Democratic party and liberals who have been cast as feminine (the party and ideology of "girlie men"), particularly via their support of the "nanny [welfare:] state." I mean really, how girlie is it to have the government "take care" of us? Republicans, on the other hand, ...more
Elizabeth
Oct 17, 2009 marked it as to-read  ·  review of another edition
Shelves: women
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Why has testosterone become the magic elixir of political power, asks Ducat (psychology, New College of California), why do spin doctors and handlers spend so much effort pumping Viagra into a candidate's rhetoric and to stage baroque macho photo opportunities? He draws on his own and other research, and on historical case studies, to highlight the connection between the magnitude of a man's terror of being feminine and his tendency to embrace right-wing political opinio
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Kayla Platoff
Dec 26, 2015 rated it liked it
I was pretty interested in the topic discussed, though at times it was repetitive, dated, and sounded a bit like a college paper in need of revision. Regardless, Ducat made many good points and had a wealth of examples of how stereotypical masculinity and femiphobia permeate American politics, particularly in his chapter entitled "Vaginas with Teeth and Castrating First Ladies: Fantasies of Feminine Danger from Eve to Hillary Clinton".
Vicki
Apr 22, 2008 rated it it was amazing
Recommends it for: those interested in gender and politics
Those who study gender know that its effects can be seen EVERYWHERE. This is a very good study of gender in politics. It should give anyone who reads it a whole new respect for Hillary Clinton regardless of personal feelings toward her.
Rakhi
Feb 09, 2008 rated it it was amazing
Fascinating ideas I've never considered.
Inelle
Mar 22, 2009 rated it it was amazing
An interesting analysis of the development of gender roles in the 19th and 20th centuries and the central role the meaning of masculinity has had on American politics.
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